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Full text of "Carpenter"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/carpenter93unit 




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1973 



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JANUARY 

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DECEMBER 

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!^'.i!'l>^l'*"'?'FW^i4-f^!''':^ 







GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Herbert C. Skinner 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D.C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

William Konyha 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington. D.C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 

Charles E. Nichols 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

M. A. Hutcheson 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Patrick J. Campbell 

130 North Main Street 

New City, Rockland Co., New York 

10956 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

130 Mountain Avenue 
Springfield, New Jersey 07081 

Third District, Anthony Ochocki 
18400 Grand River Avenue, 
Detroit, Michigan 48223 

Fourth District, Harold E. Lewis 
2970 Peachtree Rd., N.W., Suite 300 
Atlanta, Ga. 30305 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
2800 Selkirk Drive 
Burnsville, Minn. 55378 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 
Glenbrook Center West — Suite 501 
1140 N.W. 63rd Street 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73116 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 

Room 722, Oregon Nat'l Bldg. 

610 S.W. Alder Street 

Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, M. B. Bryant 

Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 

Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 

2418 Central Avenue 

Windsor, Ontario, Canada 

Tenth District, Eldon T. Staley 
4706 W. Saanich Rd. 
RR #3, Victoria, B. C. 




William Sidell, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

If your local union wishes to list de- 
ceased members in the "In Memoriam" 
page of The Cnrpe.}iter, it is necessary 
that a specific request be directed to the 
editor. 



In processing complaints, the only 
names which the financial secretary needs 
to send in are the names of members 
who are NOT receiving the magazine. 
In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. Members who die or are sus- 
pended are automatically dropped from 
the mailing list of The Carpenter. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to tlie CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should lie mailed to THE CARPEISTER. 
101 Constitution Ave.. N.W.. Washington. D. C. 20001 



NAME- 



Local No 

Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of addres.'^. 



NEW ADDRESS. 



City 



State 



THE 



(S/A\[S[? 





VOLUME XCIII 



No. I 



JANUARY, 1973 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick. Editor 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Membership to Vote on Vital Pension Issues 2 

The Trouble with Clearcutting Steve McNeil 4 

Apprentice Winners Tour Industry Facilities 9 

New Secretary of Labor Is Building Tradesman 10 

People with Ideas 12 

Play It Safe, Check the Wind-chill Factor 26 

A Hammer Is o Hammer Service Tools institute 28 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 8 

Canadian Report Morden Lazarus 14 

Service to the Brotherhood 17 

Plane Gossip 30 

What's New? 31 

CLIC Report 34 

Your Union Dictionary, No. 15 36 

In Memoriam 37 

Lakeland News 39 

In Conclusion William Sidell 40 



POSTMASTERS, ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Foim 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Publisiied rr.onthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E.. Weshington. 0. C. 20018. by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of Ar^erica. Second class postage paid at Washington. 
0. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20$ in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

A picture of a farm deep in January 
snow adds beauty to our 1973 calen- 
dar cover. 

Wall calendars are designed to suit 
just about everyone. Nature lovers de- 
light in. flowers and butterflies. Sports- 
men consult one to find out when the 
fish are biting, and garage mechanics 
can enjoy a girl-watching guide en- 
titled. "Gentlemen. Start Your En- 
gines." 

Contemporary or traditional, more 
than 300 million calendars are issued 
in the LJnited States and Canada each 
year. 

Many are distributed free by com- 
panies seeking to promote their goods 
or services. In fact, calendars first 
began to flourish as an advertising 
medium late in the 19th century. 

Conservative homeowners preferred 
ornate calendars depicting vine-cov- 
ered cottages. Gibson Girls, and turtle 
doves. Pictures were embellished with 
pansies and curlicues. People liked 
them so much they kept them as 
decorations long after they were 
obsolete. 

NOTE: Readers who would like copies 
of this cover iinnioyred by a inaili/it; label 
may obtain them by sending 700 in coin 
to cover mailing; costs to the Editor, The 
CARPENTER, 101 Constitution Ave., 
N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001. 



CARREMTER 



"■^;' 








P 



The General Headquarters in Washington, D. C, 
sent, last month, to all state, provincial and district 
councils and to all beneficial local unions, the accom- 
panying, detailed memorandum. It calls tor a general 
vote by the membership during February and early 
March. We urge you to take a few minutes to become 
familiar with its contents. 



December 26, 1972. 

Dear Sirs and Brothers: 

There were fifty-five resolutions submitted to the 
Thirty-first General Convention held in San Francisco 
in 1970 all having to do with either changes in the 
amount of the pension benefits or changes in eligibil- 
ity for pension benefits. The Convention did not adopt 
any of these resolutions but instructed the General 
Executive Board to retain an actuarial firm to study 
the Pension Plan and submit a report of the funding 
of the present Plan as well as a proposal for new 
benefits to be submitted to the next General Conven- 
tion. 

The General Executive Board did employ the firm 
of Martin E. Segal Company to make such an actu- 
arial study and this firm has now completed its 
study; however, the tremendous increase in the num- 
ber of pensioners in 1972 and its effect on the cur- 
rent pension funding does not permit this issue to be 
laid over till the next General Convention in 1974. 

The current pension funding was based upon the 
15-year actuarial study prepared for the period 1959- 
1973. The present funding was adopted by general 
vote of the membership in 1959 and provided for an 
increase of 250 in the per capita tax commencing in 
1959. This pension funding was adopted on the basis 
that a surplus would be built up during the early part 
(1959-1966) of this 15-year period when the number 



Tremencfous mcretise in 
number of pens/oners in 1972 
requires membership to 
decide on their future 
commitment to the pension 
program. 



of pensioners were relatively less and this surplus 
would then hopefully be sufficient to meet the increased 
pension expenditures during the latter part (1967- 
1973) of the 15-year period when the number of pen- 
sioners would substantially increase. 

In the 1966 General Convention the membership 
adopted a proposition to double the maximum pen- 
sion benefit (from $15.00 to $30.00 a month) and to 
double the amount of the per capita tax (600 to 
$1.20). While on its face this action would appear 
to leave the pension funding in the same status, it 
actually had a very detrimental efi'ect. Because the 
number of pensioners increased tremendously from 
1967 to 1973, this action necessarily consumed the 
accumulated reserves at a greatly accelerated rate. 

Another contributing factor which has affected the 
current inadequacy of the Pension Fund to sustain a 
$30.00 per month pension benefit is the difference 
the actuarial study and the actual number of pension- 
ers on the pension rolls. The projection of the actu- 
arial study overestimated the actual number of pen- 
sioners in the early part of the 15-year period and 
drastically underestimated the actual number of pen- 
sioners in the latter part of the period. 

The net overall effect of this difference between the 




number of actual pensioners and the number of pro- 
jected pensioners now amounts to 7,891 more pen- 
sioners than were projected, i.e., the 1959-1973 actu- 
arial study projected there would be 41,666 pension- 
ers on the pension rolls in 1972 and we actually have 
49,557. The effect of this difference on the pension 
funding is that the Pension Fund is now paying pen- 
sion benefits amounting to $710,190.00 per quarter 
more than the projected pension expenditure. 

While there was a significant difference between the 
projected increase in the number of pensioners each 
year and the actual increase in the number of pension- 
ers each year, the greatest difference occurred in 1972. 
While the actuarial study had projected an increase 
of 4,626 pensioners in 1972, our pension rolls actu- 
ally increased by 7,274 pensioners. This means that 
during the year 1972 alone, our number of pensioners 
on the pension rolls increased by 2,648 (51%) more 
than was projected by the actuarial study. 

The 1970 General Convention adopted a 250 in- 
crease in per capita tax to the Pension Fund. This 
amount has proven to be far less than adequate to 
meet the pension benefit expenditures which have re- 
sulted from the greatly increased number of pension- 
ers. Consequently, the reserves of the Pension Fund 
have now been consumed. The present Pension Fund 
predictable income amounting to approximately $3,- 
200,000.00 a quarter is inadequate to continue pay- 
ment of a $30.00 a month maximum pension benefit 
which based upon the present number of pensioners 
requires a quarterly pension benefit expenditure of 
approximately $4,500,000.00. 

For these reasons plus the fact that the actuarial 
study of the Martin E. Segal Company was completed, 
the General President appointed a Pension Advisory 
Committee to review this entire matter and make a 
recommendation to the General Executive Board. This 
Pension Advisory Committee was composed of one 
local officer of either a District or State or Provincial 
Council from each of the ten Districts of the United 
Brotherhood. 

This Pension Advisory Committee and the General 
Executive Board reviewed the complete record of the 
entire matter up to the present time as well as the 
actuarial study prepared by the Martin E. Segal Com- 
pany. This Committee considered the entire matter 
and all the various alternatives. They concluded that 
the membership would have to decide whether or not 
they desire to provide the necessarj income to en- 
deavor to continue the pension payment at the $30.00 
per month level. Unless the membership decides to 
provide the necessary income to continue a monthly 
pension benefit at the $30.00 level, the monthly pen- 
sion benefit in accordance with the Constitution and 
Laws of the United Brotherhood and consistent with 
past practice will have to be reduced so as to be com- 
mensurate with Pension Fund income. 

The new actuarial study covered a 10-year period 
through 1982. This study showed a steadily increas- 
ing number of pensioners each year through 1982 at 
which time it is projected that there would be 85,720 
tnembers on the pension rolls. Based on a $30.00 
per month pension benefit, this would amount to a 



projected pension expenditure of $30,860,000.00 for 
the year 1982. 

Based upon this actuarial study and its most favor- 
able assumptions, the General Executive Board and 
the Pension Advisory Committee concluded that if 
the membership desired to endeavor to continue pay- 
ment of a monthly pension benefit at the $30.00 level 
for the next ten years, a $1.25 increase in per capita 
tax to the Pension Fund would be required. 

The Pension Advisory Committee recommended 
that on this basis the membership by general vote 
decide whether or not they are desirous of continuing 
a pension benefit at the $30.00 level. The Pension 
Advisory Committee also recommended that the Gen- 
eral Executive Board prepare informational material 
to be distributed to the membership, giving a brief 
history of the United Brotherhood's Pension Plan and 
the conclusions of the current actuarial study. Such 
informational material is now being prepared and will 
be sent to all beneficial local unions in conjunction 
with the Circular calling for the general vote on this 
matter. 

We will send to all beneficial local unions enough 
copies of this informational material for the entire 
membership. All beneficial local unions upon receipt 
of the Circular calling for the general vote must en- 
close a copy of this informational material for each 
beneficial member when they mail their Special Call 
Meeting notice. The General Executive Board is en- 
deavoring to make this material as informative as 
possible and hopefully it will answer many questions 
concerning this matter. 

The General Executive Board as well as the Pen- 
sion Advisory Committee concludes that a situation 
wherein the continuance of the $30.00 per month pen- 
sion benefit now requires a quarterly pension expendi- 
ture in excess of $1,000,000.00 more than Pension 
Fund income cannot be delayed but requires that this 
issue be met and acted upon now. 

Because of the urgency of this matter, it is antici- 
pated that the Circular Call for the general vote will 
be sent out around February 1, 1973, and the return 
of the general vote will have to be received on or 
about March 15, 1973. The purpose of this commu- 
nication is to advise you of the seriousness of this 
situation and to give you as much advance notice as 
possible of this forthcoming general vote. 

The membership by their vote shall determine the 
future course of their pension, i. e., does the member- 
ship desire to increase per capita tax to the Pension 
Fund $1.25 per month in order to attempt to con- 
tinue the pension benefit at the $30.00 per month 
level for the next ten years? 

Fraternally yours. 



William Sidell 

Chairman General Executive Board. 

R. E. Livingston 

Secretary General Executive Board. 



tk 



BY STEVE McNEIL 



The Trouble 
With Clearcutting 




■ The trouble with clearcutting 
is that there is no way of making a 
clearcut site look like anything but 
a disaster area. It looks as if the 
Air Force, the Army, the Marines, 
and possibly a herd of elephants, 
followed by a rock festival attended 
by a couple thousand hippies had 
been through the place. 

Then, just as surely as thunder 
following lightning, buckety-buckety, 
along come the environmentalists, 
every one of them with a camera, 
leading several politicians and news- 
papermen along by their beards, and 
happily pointing to "the rape of our 
forests." 

You can hardly blame the poli- 
ticians, who probably have never 
been near a tree except when walk- 
ing their dogs, and you can't put the 
knock on the newspapermen be- 
cause "rape" always was a good 
story. The photos are dutifully 
printed in newspapers and maga- 
zines and prove without question 
that a logger is a "wood butcher." 
and the wood products companies 



are "systematically destroying our 
natural resources." 

There is almost no point in re- 
futing this sort of thing by pointing 
out that timber is a crop, that forests 
are a renewable resource, and that 
all the tree harvesting giants, such 
as Georgia-Pacific and Weyerhauser 
have elaborate reforestation pro- 
grams. Georgia-Pacific, for in- 
stance, hand planted eight and a 
half million seedlings last year, and 
at this moment have nearly eleven 
million young trees growing in nur- 
series to start new forests beginning 
this fall. 

Vital-Statistics Syndrome 

No one wants to hear about that. 
A photo of little seedlings is about 
as exciting as a haircut and no editor 
is going to run it. Neither is he go- 
ing to run a story about the birth of 
a new forest to counter a story about 
"slaughter of the redwoods."' for in- 
stance, for the same reason that 
murder is on the front page, and 
births are buried under "vital statis- 
tics." 



Ask a housewife in Omaha, Ne- 
braska, an auto industry worker in 
Detroit, a cab driver in New York, 
or a checker in a supermarket in 
Los Angeles about saving the for- 
ests and you'll hear: "I'm all for it. 
They oughta quit cutting down 
trees." or "You bet. This keeps up, 
our grandkids won't know what a 
tree looks like 'cause there won't be 
any left." Or "Saw a picture in the 
paper the other day. Looked like a 
tornado had been through that for- 
est. Loggers, that's what went 
through it." 

It has become fashionable to be 
an environmentalist, and people 
who, five years ago. thought ecology 
had something to do with glands, 
have now become experts and at 
cocktail parties and when writing 
letters to the editor mouth phrases 
like, "ecosystems" and "biodegrad- 
able" and "the nutrient pool"' and 
"excessive siltation." The U.S. For- 
est Service has become "a tool of 
the executioners of the forests." The 
Forest Service has been in existence 



THE CARPENTER 



Super-conservationists may make the working man the endangered 
species, instead of the trees they believe they are protecting 




for 81 years, and at the present time 
manages 154 national forests, 19 
national grasslands for a total of 
186.632,152 acres in 44 states, 
Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. 

Saved for Slander 

The men who manage this vast 
acreage are professional foresters, 
most of them graduates of Schools 
of Forestry in our Universities, and 
have forgotten more about conser- 
vation than the dilettante will ever 
learn. On those 154 forests for 
which the Forest Service is the land- 
lord, they are kept too busy to be 
the tool of anybody. There were 
12,239 fires in 1971 on Forest Serv- 
ice acreage, and they were hosts 
to 178,109,500 tourists, just for 
openers. They also man 1,500 look- 
outs during the fire season, use 
parachutists, helicopters, and fixed- 
wing aircraft, in addition to conven- 
tional methods for fighting fire, but 
the lunatic fringe of ecology, if it 
even noticed, would say, "Sure. They 
saved all that acreage for the timber 
barons to rape." 



The U.S. Forest Service, along 
with other serious students of for- 
estry, has endorsed clearcutting in 
certain areas as the best method of 
harvesting timber and speeding re- 
growth. In the Litde River Basin, 
in Humboldt County in the state of 
California, a hundred square miles 
of redwood, sixty years ago, were 
ruthlessly clearcut, completely 
stripped, burned, to kill any new tree 
growth, and then seeded to grass, 
because at that time raising cattle 
was more imporant than growing 
trees. The project was a disaster — 
but not for the redwoods. What the 
cattlemen didn't realize was that this 
was timber country. Soil and mois- 
ture conditions were perfect for 
growing redwoods, they refused to 
be driven out and just plain re- 
claimed the entire valley. Now, you 
can stand on a promontory named 
Squaw Tit, and as far as the eye 
can see, look at redwood trees taller 
than a fifteen story building. Now 
owned and managed by Georgia- 



Pacific, this area is protected by a 
sustained growth forestry program 
with harvesting geared to annual 
growth. But there are people who 
will take you on a guided tour of 
the redwoods or show you a film of 
a recently clearcut stand of timber 
which, frankly, looks like a mad- 
man's dream, and with the righteous 
indignation of an evangelist preach- 
ing against sin, yelp, "There you 
are, brethren, see how the timber 
beasts have devoured your herit- 
age?" 

"Horrors!" you say, go home, fill 
out a Sierra Club application, write 
to your Congressman and Senator, 
the editor of the local paper, and 
scream "rapist!" every time you see 
a loaded logging truck on the high- 
way. The same sort of hysteria 
burned witches in Salem. 

Conservation is defined as 
"planned management of a natural 
resource," which is what government 
agencies such as the Forest Service 
and the Soil Conservation Service 



JANUARY, 1973 




do because they were formed for 
that purpose. If they don't manage 
things properly, they'll get investi- 
gated and a few heads may roll. 

On the other hand, if the private 
forest products company doesn't do 
a good job of managing timber, he'll 
run out of wood, go bankrupt, and 
every head in the place will roll. 

Clearcutting is a part of "planned 
management," which makes it a 
little less sensational than "rape" 
and not likely to draw much of a 
crowd. Nor are thoughtful students 
of forestry going to convince any 
fanatics when they discuss clearcut- 
ting. The voice of reason, judgment, 
clear thinking and experience is not 
in good standing in these days of 
slogan shouting, and is dismissed 
contemptuously as a "tool of the 
establishment." 

Completely Phony Issue 

Nevertheless, professional forest- 
ers realize that clearcutting is the 
most visible of all timber harvest- 
ing methods and has become the 



whipping boy in a completely phony 
issue. Clearcutting is merely a for- 
estry silvicultural practice whose 
purpose is to harvest the existing 
stand and replace it with another. 
It is a technique whereby all the 
pre-existing forest is removed at a 
given time, leaving an area where 
the new stand develops without any 
appreciable living influence of the 
previous stand. This means that the 
area looks like Hell, which no one 
will deny. 

One alternative is selective high 
grading, which, according to James 
S. Bethel, dean of the College of 
Forest Resources of the University 
of Washington, "has created more 
junk forests in the United States 
than have ever resulted from the use 
of clearcutting." 

Another alternative is one which 
has vast appeal for the neophyte 
ecologist. Lock up the forest and 
let nature manage the entire opera- 
tion. 

The trouble with this theory is 



that nature is a lousy manager. For- 
ests, if left to nature, become ripe, 
overripe, then become prey to in- 
sects, disease, rot, fire and wind. 

The Miramichi wildfire of 1825 
charred 3,000,000 acres of Maine 
and New Brunswick. 

In 1846 the Yaquina burn in 
Western Oregon blackened 450.000 
acres and destroyed 25 billion board 
feet of timber. By today's stand- 
ards, it would take three years to 
harvest that much timber from the 
State of Oregon. 

The Tillamook burns of Western 
Oregon in 1933, 1939, and 1945 
devastated 354,936 acres and de- 
stroyed over 1 3 billion board feet of 
timber. 

In 1921, on the western slope of 
Washington's Olympic Peninsula. 
110 mile an hour winds cut a swath 
through the forest 70 miles long 
and 30 miles wide, destroying six 
billion board feet of timber, and 
killing thousands of elk. 

Certainly there are still fires, and 



THE CARPENTER 



The Little River Basin in Northern California, which was brutally clearcut between 1900 and 1920 by cattlemen, 
who tried to grow grass in the area. They couldn't drive the redwoods out, and these trees are now as tall as 
a 15-story building. 




there are still windstorms, but the 
very forest practices which the 
pseudo-ecologist decries help to de- 
feat nature when she starts her ruth- 
less clearcutting. Roads built by 
loggers to get the timber out also 
get fire fighting equipment in. A 
young healthy forest is much better 
able to withstand high winds, and 
there is much less combustible trash 
lying around on the forest floor to 
feed fires. 

Logging a forest is pretty much 
like harvesting a field of wheat or 
corn, but logging deals with tre- 
mendous weights, and to handle 
those weights uses tremendous 
pieces of equipment which, noisy 
and almost awesome in their power, 
lead the uninitiated to believe that 
the entire country will be shorn of 
trees in no time at all. Every film 
of a logging operation shows the 
falling of a tree, which is the most 
spectacular sight of tree harvesting. 
The fallers, highly skilled, now use 
power saws instead of the "misery 



whips" which they formerly used. 
They do the final tipping of the tree 
with hydraulic jacks instead of 
wedges, but the result is the same. 
A set of fallers can drop a tree on 
a blanket, although it would be 
kind of hard on the blanket. 

Spare that Cornstalk 

No one gets excited over, say, a 
cornstalk being cut. But show a 200 
foot tree crashing to the forest floor 
and the cries of anguish are liable 
to be noisier than the sound of the 
falling tree. No one has written a 
poem which says, "Farmer spare 
that cornstalk," but George Pope 
Morris, in 1830, wrote: "Woodman, 
spare that tree! Touch not a single 
bough! In youth it sheltered me, and 
I'll protect it now." 

Of course, he was pleading for 
an elm tree that stood just where 
is now the crossing of 98th Street 
and West End Avenue in New York 
City, and although the poem has 
been used as a rallying cry, it is 
doubtful whether Morris had in 



mind anything other than saving 
one elm tree. 

Joyce Kilmer once wrote: "Poems 
are made by fools like me, but only 
God can make a tree." This of 
course is true, if a trifle obvious, 
and it has been so widely quoted 
that it is almost a part of our herit- 
age. An equally true statement is: 
"Poems are made by fools like me, 
but only God can make a tobacco 
plant." It is doubtful whether this 
would have wide acceptance, and 
there has been no hue and cry over 
the harvesting of tobacco, even 
though the Surgeon General is dis- 
enchanted over the effects of it. 

The forest now seems to be a 
cause celebre among the environ- 
mentalists and clearcutting seems to 
be the villain. In a Washington, 
D.C. hearing on National Forest 
use, a Congressman admitted he 
didn't realize "we had to cut down 
trees to have houses," which should 
give you a clue as to how much 
people really know about trees. ■ 



JANUARY, 1973 



w>.. . 





ROUNDUP 



KEY JOBLESS AREAS— The Hamilton-Middletown , Ohio, area, one of the nation's 150 
major labor areas, came off the Labor Dept.'s list of "substantial" unemployment 
areas in November, but 46 job markets remained on the list. 

Substantial unemployment is considered to be more than 6 percent of the 
workforce out of jobs. The nation's jobless rate has hovered at about 5.5 percent 
since last June. 

The improved employment picture in Hamilton-Middletown was attributed in 
large part to employment increases in local steel mills. 

Ninety of the 150 major labor areas in November were classified in the 
"moderate" joblessness category (3.0 to 5.9 percent). The number of areas with 
"low" unemployment (1.5 to 2.9 percent) was 14. 

The Labor Dept. also removed six small cities from the list of depressed 
small cities, and added four. Added to the list were Roberta, Ga. ; Great Barring- 
ton, Mass.; Mount Pleasant, Mich., and Geneva-Canandaigua, N.Y. 

Small cities that dropped below the 6 percent unemployed level were Monroe, 
La.; Bay St. Louis and Picayune City, Miss.; Kirhiteville, N.C.; Fillmore, Utah, 
and Parker sburg, W. Va. 

The number of major cities with substantial unemployment peaked at 65 in 
October 1971. 

FANNING RENAMED— John H. Fanning, senior member of the five-man National Labor 
Relations Board, was appointed to an unprecedented fourth term by President Nixon. 
A Democrat, the 56-year-old Panning has served longer than any other man on the 
independent agency since it was created in 1935. He has now been named to suc- 
cessive five-year terms by four chief executives. Presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy, 
Johnson and Nixon. 

First appointed to the board in 1957, Fanning will serve a term expiring 
on Dec. 16, 1977. His reappointment is subject to Senate confirmation when the 
93rd Congress convenes in January. 

Fanning is one of two holdovers from the Kennedy-Johnson Administrations. 
Howard Jenkins, Jr., a Republican, came to the board in 1963. 

Nixon has appointed three new members to the labor board since taking office. 
He named Edward B. Miller, a former management lawyer as chairman, and subse- 
quently appointed two career NLRB staff members to the bipartisan board, Ralph E. 
Kennedy, a Republican, and John A. Penello, a Democrat. 



PAY BOARD'S FIRST YEAR— Whatever may be said about the succes 
President Nixon's New Economic Policy during its first year 
it can be said that the Pay Board succeeded in its Presiden 
hold down wage increases." 

Final figures for the year show that wage boosts for 1 
were held to 5.2 percent as compared with the 5.5 percent 1 
Cost of Living Council. 

In the case of 9,201,000 workers new contract increase 
percent. In the case of 10,555,000 deferred wage increases 
previous year boosts were held to 5.3 percent. 

The Price Commission didn't do so well. Its assigned 
the increase in the cost of living over the same year was 2 
end of October, the cost of living had climbed at an annual 
over the year. 



s or failure of 

ending November 14, 
tial assignment "to 

9,956,000 workers 
evel decreed by the 

s were held to 5. 1 
negotiated during the 

goal for controlling 
5 percent. As of the 
rate of 3.4 percent 



8 



THE CARPENTER 



Apprentice Champs Bone, Froese, 
and Yenneri study an explanation 
sign at the entrance to Georgia- 
Pacific's Levi Wilcoxon Demon- 
stration Forest near Crossett, 
Arkansas. Describing the forest 
at right is GP Official 
Dicl< Williams. 




1972 Carpenter Apprentice Winners Tour 
Manufacturing Facilities As Guests of Industry 



■ The three winners of the 1972 Carpenter Ap- 
prenticeship Contest were recipients last November, 
of an all-expense tour of the Georgia-Pacific Corpora- 
tion's integrated forest products operations in Crossett, 
Ark., and a sightseeing trip to New Orleans, La. 

The tour was awarded to Cornelius Froese of 
Winnipeg, Man., first place carpenter; Mario Venneri 
of Philadelphia, Pa., first place cabinetmaker; and to 
James G. Bone of Davenport, la., first place mill- 
wright, by the National Forest Products Association. 
It included a two-day tour of both forestry and manu- 
facturing operations at Georgia-Pacific's Crossett 
Division — one of the largest wood products manufac- 
turing complexes in the world. 

The three winners were guests of Georgia-Pacific 
while in Crossett. Their tour included a visit to G-P's 
Levi Wilcoxon Demonstration Forest — a forest which 
includes virgin timber, second-growth timber, as well 
as a newly-harvested site which is being regenerated. 
Their forestry tour also included a look and explana- 
tion of G-P's work in tree genetics, forest management 
for plywood, sawlog and pulp production, plus man- 
agement of its bottomland hardwood stands. 

Touring Georgia-Pacific's manufacturing operations, 
the three champions visited stud, plywood and pulp 
mills, as well as bleached and unbleached kraft mills 
and a tissue mill. 

The tour gave the three apprentice winners an op- 
portunity to see forest industry operations from the 
planting of seedlings, through the scientific manage- 
ment of trees, including timber harvesting, to the man- 
ufacture of paper products and lumber and plywood 
building materials used in construction. 

Dinners and luncheons with G-P officials were ar- 

Continiied on Page32 




Pierce, Bone, Froese, and > enneri natch the flo« of pulp 
over a screen on the bleached kraft paper machine at the 
number-two paper mill in Crossett. 




The three contest winners were honored at a special dinner 
in Crossett, Ark. They arc shown here with plant officials. 
Left to right: Eric Bauer, Crossett plywood plants manager; 
Froese; Donald McDonald, assistant personnel manager for 
Crossett paper operations; Venneri; Dick Williams; G-P pro- 
fessional forester; and .lim Bone. 



JANUARY, 1973 



■ The leader of New York State 
building tradesmen has been desig- 
nated by President Nixon as his 
next Secretary of Labor. 

He is Peter J. Brennan, 54, presi- 
dent of both the New York State 
and New York City Building and 
Construction Trades Councils. 

Brennan, if confirmed by the Sen- 
ate, will succeed James D. Hodgson. 
Confirmation is expected without 
difficulty. 

The New Yorker, a member of 
the Painters Union, backed Presi- 
dent Nixon both in 1972 and in 
1968. He also has been aligned with 
New York Republican Governor 
Nelson Rockefeller. 

He first came to the attention of 
Nixon in 1970 when he led a parade 
of 150,000 New York construction 
and maritime workers in support of 
the Administration's Vietnam pol- 
icy. Later Brennan and other New 
York unionists who demonstrated 
were invited to the White House. 

AFL-CIO President George 
Meany called the selection of Bren- 
nan "a fine choice." 

He will be the first trade union- 
ist to hold a Cabinet post since the 
late Martin P. Durkin, president of 
the Plumbers and Pipefitters, dur- 
ing the first Eisenhower Adminis- 
tration. Durkin resigned after nine 
months in a dispute over changes in 
the Taft-Hartley Act. 

Brennan has silver-white hair, 
twinkling eyes, a ruddy face and a 
ready smile. Despite a good-natured 
attitude, he can be snappish when 
angered. He has a reputation for 
speaking out in blunt and often col- 
orful language. 

One of seven children in an iron 
worker's family, Brennan took up 
the painter's trade while still a stu- 
dent at Textile High School. He be- 
came involved in union activities 
later while attending classes at the 
College of the City of New York. 

Brennan achieved a journeyman's 
status before interrupting his career 
for service in the Naval Submarine 
Forces during World War 11. After 
returning to painting in 1947, he 
was elected business manager of 
Painters Local 1456. He was elected 
to head the building trades' coun- 
cils in 1957. He also is a vice-presi- 
dent of the New York State AFL- 
CIO. (PAD ■ 



New US 
Secretary 
of Labor 
Is Building 
Tradesman 

Peter Brennan Talks Freely 
Of the Problems He Faces 




BY DUANE EMME 

Press Associates, Inc. 

■ Peter Joseph Brennan is a man 
hoping that history won't repeat 
itself. He doesn't think it will, but he 
can't be certain. 

Brennan, president of the New 
York City and New York State 
Building and Construction Trades 
Councils, appeared at a press con- 
ference in the Hotel Commodore 
shortly after President NLxon named 
him to succeed James D. Hodgson 
as Secretary of Labor. 

Brennan also spoke briefly to some 
200 representatives of New York 
unions attending a Conference on 
Labor and International Affairs 
being held in the same hotel. 

One of the first questions at the 
press conference dealt with the 
"history" that confronts Brennan. 
"Was he aware of the experience of 
Martin P. Durkin, the last labor 
leader to hold the post of Secretary 
of Labor?" a reporter asked. 

Durkin w as president of the AFL- 
CIO Plumbers and Pipefitters when 
President Eisenhower chose him as 
Labor Secretary in 1952. The 
Cabinet was tagged as "nine million- 
aires and a plumber." Just nine 
months after taking office — in 
September 1953 — Durkin quit, 
charging Eisenhower had reneged 
on a promise to liberalize the 
Taft-Hartley Act. 

Brennan said he was familiar 
with Durkin's experience and he 
foresaw some "rough days ahead." 
He vowed to give the job everything 
he has and expressed confidence he 
could advance programs to benefit 
workers. But answers to other 
questions, fired by newsmen in 
rapid-fire, posed some difficulties 
that might lie ahead: 

Brennan said he wants wage and 
price controls "phased out" in the 



months ahead but he declined to 
go into detail on how it could be 
done. He said he would have to see 
what the situation was when he 
got to Washington. 

He expressed firm opposition to 
Nixon's proposal in the last Congress, 
later withdrawn, for compulsory 
arbitration in transportation. He also 
promised to bring representatives 
of unions into Labor Department 
positions. 

Brennan said he conferred with 
Nixon at Camp David, Md.. the 
day before the White House an- 
nounced his selection. Asked if he 
knew why NLxon chose him, Brennan 
said the President, "must have 
thought I was the man he wanted." 

In his talk to unionists attending 
the international affairs conference, 
Brennan said he told Nixon, that 
he wasn't going to be "window 
dressing" in his new job. "I'll be 
talking to him and I'll yell at him 
when I have to," he said. "I'm still 
going to be a labor man." 

Brennan said he was convinced 
that Nixon wants to initiate programs 
to help workers in his second term. 
The President realizes, he added, 
"that his party hasn't always been 
responsive to the needs of labor." 

The White House described 
Brennan as a lifelong Democrat. 
However, he campaigned vigorously 
for Nixon's re-election this year, 
as well as backing him in 1968 in his 
race against Hubert Humphrey. 
He also supported Governor Nelson 
Rockefeller in 1970. Brennan 
classified himself as "an Independent 
right now." 

In 1970, he led a delegation of 
building trades leaders that went to 
Washington to voice support for 
President Nixon's Vietnam policies. 
Brennan presented Nixon with a 
hardhat inscribed "Commander-in- 
Chief." H 



10 



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JANUARY, 1973 



11 



-_ 0? ^ /^i 




With 





SPINNING WHEEL KEEPS TURNING 

Fred Bienapfl is becoming an expert spinning wheel maker. 
He's finished four and is contemplating a fifth. 

He was casting about for something to do when he retired, 
three years ago, and became intrigued with plans for a spinning 
wheel described in Workhencli magazine. Then he remembered 
an excellent piece of oak lumber he retrieved from a bonfire 
while remodeling a local bank a few years ago. He wrote for 
the plans for the spinning wheel and set to work in his home 
shop. 

His daughter now has a beautiful oak wheel; a niece has 
one made of walnut; then he produced a maple replica, and still 
another. 

Bienapfl has been a member of Local 2087, Crystal Lake. 111., 
since I ''3 8. He served the local union as vice president for 
three years and as president for more than eight years prior to 
his retirement. 

"1 couldn't begin to estimate how long it takes to make one 
of these spinning v.'heels," says Bienapfl. "I just go along at my 
own pace and work when I'm in the mood. If I'm dissatisfied 
with a part. I just chuck it into the fire and start over. If 1 ever 
figured out the time or tried to follow a schedule, it wouldn't 
be fun anymore." 



SPIRAL STAIRCASE BUILDER 



"To solve the secret of the carpenter's 
original stairway was not my desire." says 
Joseph M. Dunay. Rather, this craftsman 
from Local 428, Fairmont, W. Va., wants to 
"keep the works and memory of an un- 
known, expert craftsman alive." 

Dunay's 25-inch-high model of the "mi- 
raculous stairw;;y" tells its own story. It is 
a reminder of the famous stairway in the 
Chapel of Our Lady of Light, Santa Fe. New 
Mexico, which still baffles everyone. 

Featured in Ripley's "Believe It or Not" 
in the late 1920"s and in the Curpenler. 
.luly, 1965, the famous staircase was built 
in 1873 by a carpenter who did not reveal 
his name and did not ask for pay. The spiral- 
ing structure is still used, nearly a hundred 
years later, although it has no central pole 
and no apparent means of support. 

Dunay used only hand tools to carve this 
model out of spruce pine. Some tools he had 
to make himself. Like the original structure. 
no nails were used. To get straight-grained 
wood that would bend easily, Dunay hewed 
the pieces out of two-by-fours. 

The only claim I can make is that to even 
build a model of the stairway is a real test 
and challenge of skill and patience." says 
Joseph Dunay. He built the model in his 
spare time over a period of three months. 





FIDDLING RETIREMENT 

Victor Pease, 86-year-old member of Local 2046, 
Martinez, Calif., has been playing musical instru- 
ments, particularly the violin, for more than 70 years. 
When he retired from carpentry in 1960, he decided 
to make his own fiddles as a hobby, and he's turned 
out more than 30 of them to date. Each completed 
violin Is given a lady"s name, and Gloria. Helen, 
Mary, and many others are now on display in his 
home. 

Pease served his local union as president for five 
years in the late "40"s and was, for 15 years, on the 
area's joint apprenticeship committee. He is seen above 
with Mrs. Pease, with whom he celebrated 60 years 
of happy marriage, last fall. 




HANDY-DANDY SHARPENER 

Have you ever fumbled for a pencil sharpener on 
the job, only to end up frustrated and angry? Relief is 
on the way. 

Francis Chipnian, member of Local 163, Peekskill, 
N.Y.. and a friend, Melvyn E. Cowher, have come 
up with the perfect solution: a pencil sharpener built 
into the handle of a hammer. 

In 1966 Chipman and Cowher invented their "Han- 
dle Mounted Pencil Sharpener" and received United 
States and Canadian patents for the idea. Having in- 
vested $1,700.00 on the invention, Chipman believes 
the idea is worthy of acceptance. 

Chipman estimates that 75% of all carpenters use a 
standard pencil. Most of the craftsmen he has talked to 
think his invention is a good idea. What do you think? 
Write Francis Chipman, 611 Glenwood Rd., York- 
town Heights, N.Y. 10598. 






SCULPTOR IN WOOD 

E. J. Pelletier, a member of Local 1449, Lansing, 
Mich., is a master wood carver. Shown on the counter 
before him is his masterpiece, a carved briar pipe 
which was 10 years in the making. 

Pelletier has also carved a number of wood figur- 
ines, including one of Charlie Chaplin carved out of 
mahogany. Another prized piece of art is his repro- 
duction of a 16th century Sovereign of tlw Seas, a 
hand-carved sailing ship model that required more 
han 1600 hours of work. 




CABBAGE CHAMP 

Last July, "People With Ideas" featured the "turnip 
king" of Bradley County — L. R. Lord, president of 
Local 2461, Cleveland, Tenn. This month a new 
champion emerges from the gardens. 

Lloyd Hunt, a member of Local 586, Sacramento, 
Cal., shows his home-grown mammoth cabbage to 
Jerry Furniss, financial secretary of Local 586. 

The record-breaking head of cabbage weighed in 
at 16 pounds. It got national attention in a recent 
edition of Press Associates, a syndicated labor news 
service. 




CANADIAN 



New Unemployment Insurance Act 
Faces Major Test Under 
High Jobless Conditions 



The Federal government has in- 
creased payments by employers and 
employees into the Unemployment In- 
surance Fund by 10% and boosted the 
maximum benefit to SI 07 a week from 
$100. 

This is of particular interest to the 
building trades. Former Federal La- 
bor Minister Bryce Mackasey has said 
that, since construction is one of the 
most labor-intensi\'e industries, the 
fund pays eight times as much into the 
industry as it receives from it in un- 
employment insurance payments. 

Any changes in the legislation is 
bound to affect the construction 
trades. 

More changes may be coming, but 
not very likely before the ne.xt federal 
election. 

The Liberal government just 
scraped back into power in the recent 
Federal election, but with a minority 
government, winning only 109 seats 
out of 264. It held 155 seats before 
the election. 

Liberal party brass has been picking 
on various things for their dismal 
showing. One of them was the new 
Unemployment Insurance Act which 
came into effect in two stages, July, 
1971, and January, 1972. 

By the time the second stage came 
into effect. Prime Minister Trudeau 
removed Mackasey as labor minister 
and shifted him into the Department 
of Manpower and Immigration. 

Since Mackasey was the only cabi- 
net minister with a trade union back- 
ground, this shift was questioned by 
trade unionists. 

But the election resulted in the ap- 
pointment of a new cabinet to meet 
the new House of Commons January 
4th. One of the most notable omis- 
sions is Bryce Mackasey. 

Many believe (and Mackasey him- 
self has said so prixately) that he has 



been made a scapegoat for the govern- 
ment's poor record. 

Big business has, of course, objected 
to the relatively good benefits of the 
new Unemployment Insurance Act, 
charging that the benefits are too high 
and too easily obtainable, and so peo- 
ple would rather stay on unemploy- 
ment insurance than work. 

Mackasey was called upon to de- 
fend himself and the legislation for 
which he was responsible. As an ag- 
gressive and outspoken cabinet minis- 
ter, he pulled no punches. 

It is not the Unemployment Insur- 
ance Act which is at fault, he said, but 
the wrongheaded policies of the gov- 
ernment which drove up unemploy- 
ment in the interests of fighting infla- 
tion. 

The government should take more 
effective economic action to bring 
down unemployment rather than tam- 
per with the legislation, he contended. 

However, the U.I. program cost 
about $2.2 billion in 1972, about a 
billion dollars more than the estimate. 
This undoubtedly got a bad public 
reaction. People still think that free- 
loaders are a big drain on the fund 
despite all the evidence against it. 

What went wrong with the fund is 
the heavy drain from legitimate unem- 
ployment claims. The plan was geared 
to an average unemployment rate of 
47c. Below this rate, the fund would 
be in the black. Abo\'e this, the fund 
would be in the red and the Federal 
Treasury would have to subsidize it. 

Instead of 4'^p unemplovment. Can- 
ada has had between 6 and T'r . That's 
why the over two-billion-dollar cost 
has been a heavy drain on the treasury 
and will continue to be. 

But this does not mean that the plan 
is not basically sound. People can 
draw benefits after only eight weeks 
of full employment during the previ- 



ous year and receive up to $1 00 a week 
(now to be $107) or two-thirds of reg- 
ular pay. 

The average benefit paid in 1972 
was about $66 a week for 15 weeks. 
The money went chiefly into those 
areas where unemployment was high- 
est and the need was greatest. 

Consumer Rote Up 
With Jobless Funds 

Quoting Bryce Mackasey: 

"The fastest and most effective way 
to stimulate consumer spending is to 
place income in the hands of those 
who, through no fault of their own, 
are without income; that is, the unem- 
ployed. 

"The more than $1 billion we have 
injected into the economy through un- 
employment insurance benefits has 
added considerably to the general 
prosperity of Canadians and has, in 
some communities, meant the differ- 
ence between general prosperity and 
depression." 

Surplus Sulphur 
As Building Blocks 

Canada has a huge surplus of sul- 
phur as a result of remoxing the 
product from oil and gas to make 
them useable. 

With the demand for oil and gas 
increasing both in Canada and the 
United States, more and more wells 
are being tapped and the oil and gas 
stripped of its sulphur. 

There is a glut on the sulphur mar- 
ket. 

The National Research Council 
studied ways and means of making 
more use of sulphus. 

One of the most promising so far is 
the use of sulphur in building blocks. 

Apparently the blocks containing 
sulphur are a superior product — called 
sulphurcrete — non-porous, impervious 
to moisture, corrosion-resistant, and 
with a mold surface which allows high- 
ly polished or textured finishes. 

It is also a better insulator than nor- 
mal blocks. 



Land Banking 
Is Major Issue 



Public land-banking is coming into 
prominence as an important issue. 

What is bringing it to the fore is the 
fast-rising costs of residential land and 
the new support coming from both 
public and private interests, but not of 
course from the big developers. 

A key committee of the Ontario 
government, the Committee on Gov- 
ernment Productivity, has recommend- 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



ed that the government move further 
into the business of land-banking. 

But the committee did not say that 
public ownership of land should be 
used to curb speculators. Why not? 

If the purpose is not specifically to 
keep land costs down, what is the pur- 
pose? 

If the government sells public land 
at market or speculative prices, it is 
holding up the market price. The 
only difference is that the profit on 
the land goes into the public treasury 
instead of into private pockets. This 
is worthwhile, but not good enough. 

But even this first step is opposed 
by developers. Their argument is that 
the government doesn't need to buy 
up land. All it has to do is to service 
the land. The availability of service 
land in ample quantity would have the 
effect of keeping down prices. 

Land Servicing 
Benefits to Whom? 

Servicing land in excess of imme- 
diate need has its points. But if the 
government services land owned by 
speculators or the big developers, who 
is going to gain? 

It costs as much as $6,000 to service 
one lot in major urban areas. If the 
outlay is to be borne by the govern- 
ment, the public should get all the 
benefit. This means public land banks 
on a massive scale, servicing to essen- 
tial standards and renting the land at 
cost. 

'Corporate Welfare 
Bums' Are Scored 

Apparently the campaign by NDP 
leader David Lewis, a former labor 
lawyer, in the federal election, Octo- 
ber 30, had a substantial impact on 
public opinion. 

Lewis keyed on "corporate welfare 
bums'" who are given tax concessions 
by governments on the one hand and 
incentive grants on the other. They 
make it both ways. 

Lewis named some of the biggest 
corporations as the beneficiaries of 
these two-way benefits from the pub- 
lic treasury. He proved that these in- 
centives to provide jobs just don't 
work. The money is often misdirected. 
At other times it is used to introduce 
new technology and so reduces em- 
ployment, and sometimes the money 
just winds up in the corporation treas- 
ury. 

A public opinion poll taken a month 
after the Federal election asked the 
question, "Do you think that under 
the present system, the big corpora- 



tions are paying their fair share of 
ta.xes or not?" 

A total of 54% of the answers said 
no, only 18% said yes and 28% were 
undecided. 

People in every part of the country 
expressed the same opinion. In the 
west, 60% said no. 

Canada High in 
Per Capita GNP 

Canada is third in the world in per 
capita GNP income, but its health 
doesn't match its wealth. 

Recently published figures show that 
Canada was third behind the United 
States and Sweden in per capita gross 
national product in 1970. 

The report included 23 countries 
in the developed world. 

U.S. per capita GNP was $4,830 
Sweden $3,840; Canada $3,550: 
Switzerland $3,320; Denmark $3,160: 
West Germany $3,030; Luxembourg 
$2,940; Norway $2,930; France $2,- 
910, and Australia $2,830. 

But in terms of health, taking vari- 
ous factors into consideration, Canada 
ranked 14th. Infant mortality rates 
were used as the criterion. 

BC Begins First 
Guaranteed income 

British Columbia has introduced the 
first guaranteed income plan on the 
North American continent. 

Called MINCOME, the plan en- 
sures that all pensioners over 65 have 
at least $200 a month to live on. 

Everyone in Canada over the age of 
65 gets a basic pension of $82.88 a 
month ($80 plus cost of living allow- 
ance). Those with very limited in- 
comes get a supplementary pension to 
bring their incomes up to $150 a 
month. 

The B.C. government's new plan 
brings this up to $200 a month. 

Building Industry 
Panel in Ontario 

Trade unions in the building trades 
are well represented on the new labor- 
management construction industry 
panel which has been established in 
Ontario. 

This year is a big bargaining year 
for the construction industry in this 
province. It is with a view to improv- 
ing the negotiations that the panel has 
been set up by the provincial labor 
department. 

Continued on page 16 



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CANADIAN REPORT 

Continued from page 15 

The group is headed by T. C. Eber- 
lee, former deputy minister of labor, 
and one of the most knowledgeable 
men in the field. He is now head of 
the government's re-organization pro- 
gram aimed at increased efficiency in 
government administration. 

Trade unionists named to the panel 
are Ken Martin, president. Provincial 
Building Trades Council: Henry Ko- 
bryn. secretary-treasurer of the Coun- 
cil: Clive Ballentine, Toronto Build- 
ing and Construction Trades Council. 

Bargaining this year will cover more 
than 90% of collective agreements in 
construction in Ontario. 

AAanitoba No Longer 
Have-Not Province 

Manitoba had one of the best rec- 
ords for growth and employment last 
year. 

Usually considered a "have not" 
province, Manitoba's NDP govern- 
ment has stepped up its winter employ- 
ment and construction programs, es- 
pecially public housing. This had had 
the effect of keeping its unemployment 
down to 4.5 per cent compared with a 
national average of 6.5 per cent. 

In addition real wages in the prov- 
ince increased by 7.7 per cent during 
the first eight month of "72. almost 
double the national average of 3.7 per 
cent. 

Labor's Image Is 
Tarnished in 20 Years 

Labor's image is tarnished in the 
public eye. This was what a public 
opinion poll showed with 3S''f saying 
that labor was a bigger threat to the 
country than either big business or big 
government. Of the replies. 27% said 
big business and 22% said big govern- 
ment were the biggest threats for the 
future. 

This is a big change of opinion in 
the last 20 years, if the poll is to be 
believed. 

Insurance Ideas 
For Home Buyers 

The city of Prince George, B. C, 
was considering a plan of insurance 
for new home-buyers to protect them 
against shoddy construction. This 
could be a good idea and might be in- 
troduced on a nation-wide scale. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



A gallery of pictures showing some of the senior members of the 
Brotherhood who recently received 25-year or 50-year service pins. 



ELYRIA, OHIO 

Pins were presented by Local 1426 
at an 'old timer's banquet' held September 
23 at the meeting hall. 

On the left of the small photo is 
a member holding the longest member- 
ship in the local union: John Robertson, 
with a 58-year membership. Robertson 
was 90 years young last February 6. 

On the right is Theodor Trimpe, who 
received his 50-year pin at the banquet. 
Trimpe was 80 on March 31. 

Fourteen members who received 
their 25 year pins in tlie past were 
also honored. 

In the larger photo are the members 
receiving their 25-year (and more) 
pins, standing from the left to right 
are Ernest Denecia, business representa- 
tive: Joseph Salata, Lewis Schaefer, 
Russell Lettcrly, Raymond Diewald, 
Leslie Henley, Charles Senning. Claire 
Hurd, Franklin Hasel, and Allister 
Wright. 

Seated, left to right, arc Hemy Brew- 
ster, Don Hadaway, Harold Frideiistine, 
Fred Twining, financial secretary', 
George Fayer, Eugene Keltey, presi- 




dent, and Andrew Pohorence. 

The following members were not 
present to receive their pins: George 
Schaefer, Albert Tadych, Rex Giar, 
Clarence Garn, Zygmont Gawroii, 
Clarence Hale, and Mike Bodnar. 

During the last four months the local 
union has lost three of old-time mem- 
bers: George Diewald, 31 years; Paul 
Loper, Jr., having a 30 year membership 
was president and business representa- 
tive of The Lake Erie District Council, 
and John Hodges, 25 years. 





CENTRALIA, WASH. 

On September 14 Local 2127 held 
a banquet for 25 and 30-year members. 
They are shown in the accompanying 
photographs: 

TOP LEFT: 

Left to right, front row, I. S. Agren, 
30 yrs.: Elliot Tharmaklen, 30 yrs.; 
William Talbott, 30 yrs. Back 
row, J. M. Foster, business representa- 
tive; Harrv Green, president. 
Local 2127. 

BOTTOM LEFT: 

Left to right, rear. Glen W. Stover, 
25 yrs.; Leiand Uehling, 25 yrs.; Merritt 

B. Doyle. 25 yrs.. Center row, Harold 

C. Shandey, 25 yrs.; Charles E. Evans, 
25 yrs. Front row, David L. Halin, 

25 yrs. and I. S. Agren, 30 yrs. 

RIGHT: 

Left to right, rear, Martin W. 
Justice. 25 vr.v.; Albert E. Mason. 25 



yrs.: John Ramey, 25 yrs. Center row, 
James J. Babcock, 25 yrs.: Carl A. 
Hagwell, 25 yrs. Front row. Elliott 
Thormahlen, 30 yrs. and William 
Talbott, 30 yrs. 




JANUARY, 1973 



17 




CINCINNATI, OHIO 

On September 14, 1972, Local 873 honored its 25-year 
members. The pins were presented by Russell Austin, 
secretary of the Ohio Valley Carpenters' District Council. 

Shown in the front row, left to right, are Douglas 
Rothermel, Leroy McKinney, George Riestenherg, 
Haywood Strahm, June Vaiighan, Edwin Watson, and 
Leroy Wurzelbacher. 

Middle row, left to right, James Norton, Francis 
Poole, Raymond Clubb. William Campbell, Charles Tuthill, 
Rudolph Mason, Roy Hacker. Walter James, Emits 
Williams, Walter J add, George Berry, and Albert Trippel, 
hitsiness representative. 

Back row, Eugene Dalton, Bertram Burdsall, Robert 
Smithson, Kenneth Hebeler, James Anil, Robert Flaig, 
Irvin Helferich, Melvin Streitliorst, Howard Staderman, 
Edward Kautzman, Robert Warning, Charles Parker, 
and Russell Austin, district secretary. 

Not pictured: Elmer Bender, Charles Carringer, Lawretice 
Everman, Irvin Ramsey, William Schrader, Arthur Siegel, 
John Smith, and Carl Wessendorf. 

LOWELL, MASS. 

These are the 25 and 50-year members of Local 49 who were 
recently honored: 

Top row, left to right, Maurice Albert, Raymond Lepine, Maurice Nordiii, 
Rene Jiitras, Raymond Langlois, Joseph Bernat, William O'Connor, 
Einile Proulx, Roy Shedd, Fred Ovellette, Nicholas Simmons, Frank 
Connolly, and Jerome Donovan. 

Middle row, left to right. Business Agent Peter Golden, Alcxatide Durand, 
Walter Santwar, Raymond Dupont, George Ramsbottom, Tom Heppell, 
James (Doc) Jelley, Vincent McCann, and Tony Durand. 

Bottom row, Raymond Pinette, Roger Dupont, Gerard Dufour, Victor 
Marion, Louis Abren and James Scanlon. 




LOWELL, MASS. 

Members of Local 49 with 50 years 
aiul more service. 

Top row, left to right, Raymond 
Dupont, 50 years; George Ramsbottom, 
50 years, and Tom Heppell, 50 years. 

Bottom row, Atexande Durand, 55 
years: James (Doc) Jelley, 56 years, and 
Vincent McCann, 61 years. 





.&. 




18 



THE CARPENTER 




r-^ / ;4 




SHEFFIELD, ALA. 

Members of Carpenters' Local 109, 
Sheffield, were recently honored with a 
banquet and presented 25-ycar pins 
by R. H. Clay, J AC representative. 
Honored were: left to right, seated, 
T. R. Davis, W. L. Wallace. O. J. 
Miller. J. E. Whitehead. J. V. Jones, 
B. L. Dean and Edward Black. Standing, 
left to right, Joint Representative 
R. H. Clay, C. B. Stout, business 
representative, F. A. Pass. W. A. Parrish, 
W. J. Parker, J. M. McLendon. D. L. 
Kiscr. L. A. Bretherick. J. P. Hooie, 
B. W. Bradley, J. T. Ashley and A. H. 
Smith, Sr. 





:i 



RICHMOND, IND. 

At its regular meeting. October 4, 
1972, the following members of 
Local 912 were presented their 25- 
year. 30-year, and 35-year pins: 

In the larger picture (at lower 
right), from left to right, are Charles 
Roberts, Harold Wood. Ray Neff. 
George Cook, Paul Jiierling. alt 
25 years. 

In the smaller picture, left to right, 
are Morris Shields, 35 years: Arbie 
Corder. 35 years, recording secre- 
tary: Allen Coryell. 30 ye(n's: and 
Charles Moody, president. 

Members who received pins but 
were not present for the picture 
were: Glenn Cramer, 25 years; George 
Kalugyer, 25 years: Julian Towns- 
end, 25 years: Floyd Caldwell, 25 
years: Myron Caldwell. 25 years: 
Olden C. Lee, 25 years: Norman 
Mcrritt, 25 years: George Schroder. 
25 years; Herman Schroder. 25 
years; William K. Thomas. 25 years; 
Ora Beckett, 30 years; Wilbur 
Bietry, 30 years; Robert J. Hunt. 30 
years; and Guy Lamhdiu, 30 years. 

JANUARY. 1973 




TONAWANDA, N.Y. 

Local 374 recently presented pins to the following: 

50-YEAR PINS, first row, left to right: Bud Bodewes. president. 
Buffalo District Council: Al Depasqiuile; Fred Fredricksen: and Oscar Braaten. 

25 -YEAR PINS, second row. left to right. George Hallam, Art Matter, 
Frank Scordata Sr.. Sal Ciiretla. and Gordon DePirro. 

Third row. Diniglas West. Marty Naffky, Sid Witteii, Ted Simmons, 
.Andrew Pella. and Roy Ebcl. 








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BUFFALO, N.Y. 

At the October 18. 1972, quarterly 
lueeling of Millmens Local 1401 . 
Buffalo District Council President Buddy 
Bode^es presented 25, 30 and 35-year 
service pins to 73 members. 

Members slionii in photograph 
(plus their years of service) include: 

First row, left to right, Vincent 
Fihles, 35. Harold McConville. 35. 
Charles Wein, 35. Eugene Kasprzak. 35, 
Karl Hagler. 35. Robert Wiesenniayer. 
35, James Misener. 35. Otto Burkhadt, 
35. Ernest Schiiuier, 35, and Michael 
Popieia. 35. 

Second row. left to right, Edward 
Napieralski. 35. Edward Kolasny. 30, 
Otto Kiilin. 30, Herbert Neubecker, 30, 
Alvin Schmidt, 30, Mathias Feiiernstein, 
30, Heiwy Sittniewski, 30, Jacob 
Brownschidle, 30, Henry Frank, 25, 
and Ralph McConville, 35. 

Third row, Chester Sadlocha, 25, 
Ernest Gibeau, 25, Anthony Skodo^vski, 
25, Stanley Zakrzewski, 25, Waller 
Swiriduk, 25, Frank Rusin, 25, 
Leonard Pacholski, 25, George Kas, 25, 
Casimer Lagowski, 25, and Frank 
Kosiur, 25. 

Fourth row, Anthony Kolasny, 25, 
Steven Kolasny. 25. Edwin Sikorski. 25, 
Jatnes Schmidt, 25, Herbert Rickert. 
25. Alfred Spear, 25, Edward Dojka, 
25. Daniel Pacholski, 25, and Vernon 
Rischard. 25. 

Fifth row, John Plague, 25. Paul 
Choinski. 25, Chester Krupski. 25, 
Angelo Rizzo. 25, Joseph Shirinsky,, 25, 
Edward Kosiur, 25, Douglas Brooks, 



25, Theodore Fintak, 25, Leoiuird Elmer, 
25. John DeGaiii, 25, and Robert 
Yaeger, 25. 

Not present but also awarded pins 
were the following: 

25-Year Pins — German Bogenrieder, 
Frank Cardamone. Fred Duda. Norman 
Grimm, Adam Hans. Wallace Herrle, 
Richard Klaffka. Eric Koshah. Stanley 
Krygier. Howard Leising, F. Ross 



Macoomh. Joseph Meder, John Pavalko, 
Harold Popp, and Frank Tiedemau. 

30-Year Pins — George Barth, Francis 
Himbury, Alois Hurlimann, Edward 
Koszuta, and Jerome Twardowski. 

35-Year Pi /is — Otto Burkhardt. 
Anthony Fischer, Albert Golata. Chester 
Jendras. Frank Kruszcynski, and 
Isadore Mahlmeister. 




ROSEBURG, ORE. 

Members of Local 2949 recently 
received pins for 20, 25, 30 and 35 
years of membership in the Brotherhood. 
Tliev included: 



Front row. left to right. George 
Ciisseday. president of Puget Sound 
District Council; Charles Cooper, 20-year 
member: Avis Maupin, Bill Heinke, 
25-year member; and Pat Raiuiall, 
secretary -treasurer, Oregon AFL-CIO. 



Second row, left to right. Jack Osborne, 
20-year member; Ale.x Meyer, 3 5 -year 
member; Paul Veach, 20-year member; 
W. T. Ri( hardson, 25-year member; 
Gather V . Eastridge, 20-year member; 
Ray Lamon, 25-year member; and 
Arthur Smith, 20-year member. 

Back row, left to right, Paul Rard, 
20-year member; Lawrence Fredlund, 
David Lewis, 25-year members; Ray 
Ranch, 30-year member; William Bailey, 
Hugh Coltrin, Clarence Shrout. and 
Leonard Noel. 20-year members. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 




HACKENSACK. NJ. 

Recently, Local 15 honored members 
with 25- and 50-years menihersliip in 
the orqanization. first row, left to right, 
Philip Yiiiko, financial secretary, Victor 
Kiirtzo, 60-years, business agent Alex 
Prodigo, Julius Piergrossi, Harry 
Mirandi. Victor Kaiitelo, secretary- 
treasurer Benuird JoJmson, president 
Anthony DeSomma. trustee Walter 
Can, warden Joliii Grahowski, aiul 
vice president Dick Callaghan. 

Second row, seated, Robert Wilson, 
William Parsells, William Eherding, 
Frank Mayo. Edward Caruso, John 
Leha, John Stanford and Frank Sabiiio. 

Third row, Peter Bart, Bruno Scalabrin, 
Herbert DeGraf, Harold Madsen. Jack 
Malvick, Harry Magliaino, Ivar Larssen, 
Fred Kummer, Clem Gallahue, Ken Cole, 
Harry Christainsen, Harry Liiiz, George 
Muiiz. Walter Schwartz. John Eberle, 
Peter Zazzoli and Tunnis DeHeer. 

Top row, Reginald Parsells, Carl Linz, 
Joseph Isgro, Jacob Sonderfan, Gerry 
Platvoet, Andrew Cutrona. Sam Carioti, 
Joseph Wagenti, John Rapparelli, Matliew 
Talmo. David Everson, Robert Wilson 
and Steve Marandi. 



In the lower picture, Local 15 officers 
proudly honored 50- and 60-year 
members. From left to right. Business 
Representative Alex Prodigo, President 
and Business Representative Anthony 




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DeSomma, Harry Marandi, Victor 
Kantell, Victor Kurtzo, Tunnis DeHeer, 
John Eberle and Bernard Johnson, 
secretary-treasurer. At center, Victor 
Kurtzo, 60-year member. 



mmammem 




TUCSON, ARIZ. 

Members of Millwright Local 1 1 82 
received 25-year service pins at the 
local's November 1972 meeting. They 
included, left to right. Robert 
Hartman, John Sandoval, Fred 
Andrews, George Hall and George 
Arnold, Sr. 




FAIRFIELD, CONN. 

The 70ih .iniiiversary of Local 647, 
was recently celebrated at Frederick's 
of Fairfield with a dinner and dance. 
At this time pins were presented to 
the members for 25-years of 
tnembership. Left to right, front row. 
John Kowats. president of Local 
647, presents pins to. James Kowats. 
Joseph Cadrin, William Szabo, 
Andrew Dawid. Second row, from 
left, Robert McLevy, bu.iiness 
representative. William Sebestyen, 
Gino Matiini, John Zawesza, John 
Contolini, Gus Kovacs, and Robert 
Perchaluk. 



JANUARY, 1973 



21 




CUMBERLAND, MD. 

On October 2, 1972. Local 1024 
presented pins to members with 

25 years of service or more. 

Left to right, front row, Henry 
Boone, Jr., apprentice and training 
department, visitor: Aubrey Maiizy, 
27 years membership: David Ross, 
30 years: H. E. May. 30 years: 
Donald R. Scliarf, 54 years: Harvey 
May, 47 years, 90 years of age, 
serving as trustee in the local union; 
Staidey Bane, 35 years; George 
Robinson, 30 years; George Meese, 
30 years. 

Second row, same order, Fred 
McKenzie, 30 years; John R. Jones, 
30 years; Ronald Bennett, 31 years; 
F. Patrick Allender, 45 years; Ashby 
Lawrence, 26 years; Donald McGitl, 
40 years; J. E. Mullenax, 30 years; 
Paul Riinion, 32 years; Gene McGill, 

26 years; Edward Malone, 30 years; 
Thomas Danner. 30 years: Warren 
Crimn, International Representa- 
tive, who presented the pins: Elmer 
Rosenberger, 26 years. 

Third row, same order. Raymond 
Reeder, 25 years; Lloyd Zembower, 
33 years; Lewis Twigg, 33 years; 
Thomas Kenny, 30 years: Merle 
Burch, 32 years; John Stephen, 35 
years: Richard Jones, 25 years: 
Albert Hilligas, 32 years; Millard 
Calderwood, 25 years; Paid Helker, 
33 years; and George A. Brown, 
26 years. 

In addition to the members in 
the picture, the following men 
received pins; T. S. May, 55 years; 
Thomas B. Sines, 59 years; Walter 
Wagner, 59 years; Frank lines, 
53 years; Ira Brown, 52 years; Merle 




Boyer, 52 years; John F. Blubaugh, 
48 years; Russell Weber, 49 years; 
B. A. McDowell, 37 years; Raymond 
Myers, 36 years; Kenneth Ramage, 
35 years; Lloyd Barton, 31 years; 
Charles L. Brown, 30 years; Thomas 
B. Jones, 32 years: Charlie Karns, 
30 years; Troy May, 31 years; 
Ralph Porter, 30 years; Dick 



Pownall, 30 years; David Sammel, 
32 years; Russell Sowers, 33 years; 
Thomas Turner, 30 years; Russell 
Whitlock, 33 years; Fred Wolfe, 
30 years; Harvey Golden, 26 years; 
John Lindeman, 25 years; Robert 
McAllister, 25 years: Philip Reuschel, 
25 years; Eugene Weber, 25 years; 
and Robert Whisner, 25 years. 




"Service Awards" 
members and the recently- 



POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y. 

On September 16, 1972. Local 203 sponsored a 
dinner-dance. Honored were 50 and 45-year 
graduated apprentice class. 

Patrick J. Campbell, First District Board Member of the International, 
and Edward J. Briggs, Jr., local president, presented the service pins. 

Bernard Paquette. instructor of the apprentice class, and John Dowd, 
state apprenticeship representative, presented the diplomas. Stewart 
Malcolm, business agent, and Matthew Idema, chairman of the local 
apprenticeship committee, presented a gold watcli and plaque to Frank 
Animenloiin.x, first-place winner of the local apprenticeship contest. 

William H. Cargain, treasurer, served as dinner chairman. Among the 
more than 200 guests present were those shown above: 

First row, left to right, Peter Szczypca (50-year pin), Patrick J. Campbell, 
and Arvid Holmes (SO-year pin). 

Second row, 45-year-pin recipients. Merle Rose, Richard Kuenzelman, 
Gus VanAckooy, Anthony Dubetsky, and Philip DePiiy. 

Third row, the apprentice class, Guy Wyant, Robert Sullivan, Pat 
Wing, Victor Mezzacappa, Frank Ammenlounx, and Michael Gullo. 

Not present to receive their 45-year pins were; Chester Barley, Milton 
Coon, Nicola Francese, John Freer, Robert Secor and John Van Rouwendaal. 



22 



THE CARPENTER 




ST. CATHARINES, ONT. 

A banquet and dance was held on 
October 21 in lionor of members 
receiving 25-year or 60-year pins. 
General Executive Board Member 
William Stefanovitch presented the 
pins. 

Thirty-four members received 
25-year pins and two members 
received 60-year pins. 

In the large group are, Front row, 
W. Gardell, F. Cote, E. Grenier, 

A. Delazzer, C. Wichman. W. 
McLean, I. Wood, J. Dugas and 
W. Stefanovitch. 

Second row, G. Greenwood, A. 
Satkeviciiis, Jr., G. Wikobrado, 
C. Hiscock, A. Rathbone, G. Waite, 

B. Warm, P. Gagne, T. Uyede and 
T. Kaniada. 





Third row, T. Hall, P. Scapillati, 
F. Heculuck, D. Pennock, C. 
Ronholm, A. A riant, F. Thibodeau, 
F. Pakozdi, C. Sprutt, A. Fritz, H. 
Allard and H. Cote. 

Fourth row, J. Delazzer, R. 
Condirston, P. Sokoloski, G. Erhardt, 
P. Hanshar and G. Kitchen. 

In the small picture. W. McLean, 
W. Stefanovitch and C. Wichman. 




EL PASO, TEX. 

Carpenters Local 425 presented 
service pins recently in ceremonies 
at the Hilton Inn. A member of 
Local 425, International Representa- 
tive Ben Collins, made the 
presentations. 

At upper left, Milo Gibson, 
who was initiated on January 4, 
1910, received a 60-year pin from 
International Representative Collins. 

At lower left, Claude Butler, who 
was initiated in 1948, received his 25- 
year pin. Beside him. Hector Baca, 
who is a chief petty officer in the 
Seabees, received his 25-year pin. 

Finally, Martin Reyes, financial 
secretary, with Gilbert Salinas, 
30-year veteran, and Starr Sachse. 



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CHICAGO, ILL. 

John Lekner, center received his 
65-year pin in Lakeland, Fla., on 
July 12, his 67th anniversary 
membership in Local 242, Chicago, 
111. He served as treasurer before 
retiring in 1955 and was replaced 
by Frank Deckelman right now 
living in Cape Coral. Fla., also 
retired. The presentation was made 
by Edward Sienko, business 
representative of Local 242. 




HARTFORD, CONN. 

Francis McDonald, business 
representative. Local 43, receiving 
his 25-year pin recently from Edward 
Haley, president of the local union. 



JANUARY, 1973 



23 








EAST LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Tile accompanying pictures show 
, members of Local 1497 M-ho were 
presented 25-year service pins at a 
recent buffet supper. 

Their names I not shown in order of 
appearance in the pictures) are: 

Robert D. Adams, Edwin Agard, 
Abel Aguiar, Abe Aldaciishion. 
Harold Armbriist. Glen Asldock. 

Harold Bailey, Jesse Barnhardt, 
Richard Bastianelli, Frank Beal, Brran 
F. Bell, Floyd Blau. Carl R. 
Brown, Bobbie K. Burns. H. L. 
Busli, Andrew Butte. 

Aaron Carl, John Castiglione. 
Gustavo Castro, Arnold G. Chris- 
teiisen, Angela Cirocco. Louis Clark, 
Paul C off man, Ivan Cogdill. 
Ralph W. Copp. 

Erwin R. Davis, Glenn Deeds. 
William Detloff, Forest Doan, 
Roger Doiithit, Francis Dtihrall. 

Walter Enter, Miguel Estrada, 
John Evanoff. 

Frank Ferguson, Arais Fernaiuto. 
Jose Flores, Elmer Forsyth, Ralph 
Franks, Vincent Frega, Melville Funk. 

Thomas Geisler, Kenneth Gilbert. 



H, R. Gill, Charles Glass, Robert 
Gonzales, Lee Graham, John Gray, 
Oliver Groves, Evan Haddock, 

W. A. Hakomaki, Irving Halperin, 
S. R. Harkey, Herbert Harrison. 
Louis Havel, Harvey J. Mines, 
L. G. Hohbisiefken, Gene Huff, 
James W. Hurst. 

Claude Jackson, Woodrow Jinks. 

Leander Kakiik, L, U. Keppinger, 
Daniel Koop. Earl Kriens. 

Lavern Larcom, Allen W. Lesher, 
Jack T. Lockwood. Rudolph 
Lopez, Melvin O. Luttio. 

Andrew B. Madrid, Jr., Harry Z. 
Maloiiey, Angel Martinez, John 
Martinez. John Maslanka, Clarence 
Matlios, Walter May, Clarence 
McGraw, Leo W, Mitchell, Arnold 
Molnar, Henry Moiitez, Bennie 
Montoya. Weldon Moore, Garlan 
Morgan, Ralph P, Morgan, George 
Morser, Robert Morton, Cicero 
R. Mullen, Robert Murrietta. 

Ewell C, Newman, Stuart Niedring- 
hans, A. C, Nienstadt, Robert 
Norlhwood, Stephen J, Nowak, 

Bland Ogle, Frank Olea, Lotus 
i '. Ornclas. 



George C. Panattoni, Kenneth 
Parkes. Thomas Parkhill, Harry 
Parlee, Harold A, Paidsen, Rudolph 
Peterson, Ralph R, Poe, J. H. 
Potts. John A. Prentice. 

O. T. Rider, PInllip Risher, Albert 
Roberts, James C. Roberts, Edwin 
A. Robinson, Glynn Runnels. 

Sol Sandler, Frank R. Scliall, Jr., 
Theodore C. Shaw. Robert K. 
Shelton, Harry A. Shenk, Don J. 
Simpson, Robert F. Smith. Robert 
R. Smith, Daniel G. Spanks, Robert 
Stephens, Raymmul Stirk, Charles 
Steffenson, Frank Stout, Cecil Swan. 

James H. Tatum, George J. Taylor, 
Noel C. Tennison, Carl E, 
Teschler, Manuel Tirre, Kim E. 
Towler, Lester L. Trisko, James F. 
Tin- pin. 

Manuel Valencia, Elmo W. Vickers, 
Jim Vickonoff. 

John H. Walker, Roy Walker, 
George W. Warner, Warren W, 
Watson, Joseph Weimholt, Robert 
J. Weimholt, Kernutt Whitaker. 
James L, White, R. H. Whitmire, 
Joseph L, Wilson. 

Earl Yarbrough. 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



the key- 



to your future! 



SOLVE 

THESE 

PROBLEMS 

FOREVER: 





ftMWN- 
100 OLO'- 

"wcowf- 



^H ^H ^H ^I^H ORVILLE PIERCE 

^■^^B ^^^_ ^B ^1 (LaPuente, Calif.) HORACE H. ALBRIGHT W. M. RAGSDALE 

^^^^r ^^^H ^H ^H "While training I (Broolthaven, Miss.) (Conyers, Ga.) "I think 

^^■^^^ ^^Vi^ ^H ^^1 earned $200 and I now "... average about the Locl<smithing Insti- 

^^1 ^^B ^^m ^H^^^l have a mobile unit $4.00 per hour. I think tute is doing a fine job 

^^M ^^H ^^H ^^Bl^^^l which I operate in my the whole course was training people for the 

^H ^H ^H ^■■^^H spare time ... en- the greatest, the best locksmithing trade. 

^^1 ^^1 ^^1 ^K ^^B joyed the course and instructor and when I now do all the lock re- 

^H ^H ^H^^ ^M ^H think it was the best retire ... am going to pair for the County High 

^^^^^V ^^^BM ^H ^^1 instruction one can get do locksmith work full School, with a pleasing 

^^■l^r Hum ■■ ■■ in this field." time. Thank you." increase in salary." 

LOCKSMITH 



^ Newspaper headlines tell the story. 

Pick up a paper any day. Burglary, house- 
1 breaking, vandalized homes — no wonder 
I America rs locked up tighter than ever be- 
' fore. And there are more homes, more stores 
' and factories, more hotels, more cars, and 

more people. And that means more keys 

and locks. 

-^ The fast way to success . . . independence. 

From the start you get practical experience 
doing real jobs on car locks, home locks, 
padlocks, and safes. Within six months you 
can be on the road to complete indepen- 
dence of bosses, low wages, layoffs, small 
retirement income. 

Don't you owe it to yourself to get the facts 
today? The card below won't even cost you 
postage. No salesman will call. You and you 
alone can make your decision based on the 
straight-forward facts you will receive. 




^ Earn as much as $10 an hour — or more. 

7^^ Today a trained locksmith can just about 

write his own ticket. Earn as much as he 

ry, fa^ wants to work. Earn in his spare time, in a 

v-KV business of his own, or in a highly- pa id 

position with someone else. Earn in almost 

any part of the country he wishes to live. 

Learn at home — earn as you learn. 

Let Locksmithing Institute show you abso- 
lutely free how you can qualify for this ex- 
citing, action field. The information card 
below will bring you full details about the 
fast, easy course that trains you by "doing" 
for this highlv-paid profession. See how you 
can learn at home, in your spare time, even 
while you hold down your present job. See 
how the key-making machine and complete 
set of tools included with the course can 
put you in business earning money right 
while you are learning. 




LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE 

TECHNICAL HOME STUDY SCHOOLS, Little Falls, New Jersey 07424 

LICENSED BY STATE OF NEW JERSEY. ACCREDITED MEMBER NATIONAL HOME STUDY COUNCIL. 
STATE APPROVED DIPLOMA. APPROVED FOR VETERANS TRAINING. 



THIS KEY 
MACHINE 




§ PLUS y 

pieces of equipment 
LOCKS. PICKS & TOOLS 

supplied for use 
with course 




state Approved Diploma 




Special 
Instruction 
in Electronic 
Burglar Alarm 
Security Systems 
at no extra cost 
if you act now! 



, Unlock Your Full 1 
Money-Earning Capacity' 
SEND FOR THIS 
FREE BOOK TODAY 

No salesman will call j 



HURRY! MAIL THIS POSTAGE-FREE CARD! 

■iMKKKBBBBB>l' CUT OUT. Ready to Mail Coupon Belovv. -f ■■■imhbibmb _ — _ 



r- o 






5 3 



z z 



« o 
«- > 
n r- 

5 o 

■U (/) 

•»* c 
o 

-< 

«! 

o 

X 

o 
o 

r- 



a 



lc/> 



SCO 

ico 
fm 

Is 





YES, send me free 
information on 
opportunities in 
Loci(smitiiing 



Mail me sample lesson 
pages, details of the crit- 
ical need for locksmiths, 
I understand there is no 
obligation on my part 
and no salesman will call 
upon me. Dept. 1118-013. 




Name. 



Address. 
City 



State Zip 

a Check here if eligible for Veteran's Benefits. 



PLAY IT SAFE . . . CHECK THE WIND-CHILL FACTOR 



Estimated 

Wind Speed 

MPH 




ACTUAL THERMOMETER READING -P. 








50 40 30 20 


10 -10 -20 -30 


-40 


-50 


-60 


Calm 
5 
10 
15 
20 
25 
30 
35 
40 


EQUIVALENT 

50 40 30 20 
48 37 27 16 
40 28 16 4 
36 22 9-5 
32 18 4 -10 
50 16 0-15 
28 13-2 -18 
27 11 - 4 -20 
26 10-6 -21 


TEMPERATURE F. 

10 -10 


-20 


-30 


-40 
-47 
-70 


-50 
-57 


-60 
-68 


6 
- 9 


-5 -15 


-26 


-36 


-21 1 -33 


-46 -58 


-83 
-99 
- 110 
-118 
-125 
-129 
-132 


-95 
-112 
-124 
-133 

-140 
-145 
-148 


-18 


-36 -45 


-58 _ 
-67 


-72 


-85 
-96 

- 104 

- 109 
-113 
-116 


-25 


-39 -53 


-82 
-88 

-94 

-98 

-100 


-29 -44 -59 
-33 -48 -63 
-35 -49 -67 
-37 -53 -69 


-74 
-79 
-82 
-85 


Wind Speeds greater 
than 40 MPH have 
little additional effect 


LITTLE DANGER FOR 

PROPERLY CLOTHED 

PERSON 


INCREASING GREAT DANGER 
DANGER 

DANGER FROM FREEZING OF EXPOSED FLESH 



LEARN 



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$3.50 C 



Even with no previous experience you will be able 
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you build- 

HOUSE CONSTRUCTION DETAILS $14.95 [Z 

A large book with 2500 illustrations. Every step in 
house construction is explained and illustrated. Exact 
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Conforms to modern practice and building regula- 
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To use the chart, find the estimated or actual wind speed in the left-hand column and the actual temperature in degrees F. in 
the top row. The equivalent temperature is found where these two intersect. For example, with a wind speed of 10 mph and a 
temperature of — 10°F. the equivalent temperature is — 33°F. This lies within the zone of increasing danger of frostbite, and 
protective measures should be taken. 

We all know that when the ther- 
mometer registers, say 30° F.. it some- 
times seems a lot colder than on other 
days. Of course, the difference in feeling 
ffgiffl \ ,'■'■ '^i';^'^-^ )gL 's due to the amount of wind that is 

»"" xO y\\-^/^, y3^ blowing at the time. The above Wind- 

Chill Chart will help us to determine the 
protection we should use under various 
conditions. 

The Wind-Chill Chart was originally 
brought out by the U.S. Army's Cold 
Weather Laboratories and, during the 
past 10 years, has been modified in line 
with the e.xperiences of civilians and 
military men who have participated in 
the National Science Foundation's U.S. 
Antarctic Research Program. 

As one NSF report explains, "The 
human body is continually producing 
and losing heat. Wind increases the loss 
of heat by dispersing the layers of air 
between layers of clothing next to the 
skin. 

"In low temperatures, with a wind 
that removes the heat faster than the 
body can replace it, frostbite occurs. 
Thus, a lowering of the air temperature 
or a higher wind velocity acts to increase 
the danger of frostbite. 

"The combined effect of wind and 
temperature is expressed in the Wind- 
Chill Chart as an equivalent tempera- 
ture, which is the effective temperature 
acting on exposed flesh. It is empha- 

sized that the Wind-Chill Chart is of 

value in predicting frostbite only to 
exposed flesh. 

"Any clothing or material which stops 

Zip Code ^"^ reduces the wind will give a degree 
____. °f protection (from frostbite). . . ." 



MODERN CARPENTRY 



$7.96 C 

This big book of 492 pages and 1400 illustrations 
gives detailed information on all aspects of construction 
from foundation to completed house. It contains basic 
instruction for the apprentice and is a fine reference book 
for the experienced carpenter. 

WRITE FOR FREE CATALOG— many books, 
tools, and other items. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 

Full refund if book ts returned in 10 days. Alt items 
postpaid. Washington state residents add sales tax. 
Send check or money order to: 

DOUGLAS FUGin ENTERPRISES 

11347 N.E. 124th St., Kirldand, Wash. 98033 



ORDER TODAY 



Name . 
Address 
City . . 
State . . 



Prepare now at home for a rewarding Career in 
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26 



THE CARPENTER 



>?gggggSSSSS8^5SSSSS8SgS«8«gSS8ggSgS8S^58S8SSSgSgS®Sg: 




Carpentry Shop of Many Decades Past 



The picture above was taken more than 70 years ago in a 
snnll Italian village. It shows a carpentry shop belonging to 
the grandfather of Robert Vannelli. a member of Local 1050, 
Philadelphia, Pa. Shown in the picture is Brother Vannelli's 
faflier. .Michael A. Vannelli, a retired member of Local 1050. 
and members of the family. 

In this shop, the elder Vannelli turned out fine furniture, 
miflwork. and even an occasional casket . . . using the many 
tools sho>>n on the wall of the shop. 




I 



Charter Member of Auxiliary Honored 

Carpenters' Auxiliary No. 291, Klamath Falls, Ore., recently 
honored iVIrs. Peggy Long, its last remaining charter member, 
at a dinner meeting at the Cimaron Restaurant. Among those 
participating (in the picture at right) were: seated, Mrs. Betty 
Piank, Mrs. Jiianita Shultz, Mrs. Marjorie Vassallo. and Mrs. 
Adell Davis; standing, Mrs. Eleanor Cook. Mrs. N'era Hall. 

SJ-j Mrs. Erma Avant. Mrs. Mary Wells, Mrs. Zelnia Hangen, Mrs. 

W Trina Schortgen. Mrs. Long, and Mrs. Dolly Machado. 



AUDELCARPENTERS 
& BUILDERS LIBRARY 




:*!•» i 



THESE TAPER TOOLS" 

can boost your income! 

Their 1,488 pages of practical information and how-to guidance 
are invaluable "tools" for all in the building trades ... a 
complete course for the apprentice, a ready reference for 
master workers. 

Thousands of photos, diagrams and charts tell and show short 
cuts, new methods, solutions and money-saving ideas . . . how 
to use every tool and building aid . . . how to build everything 
from furniture to houses . . . how to frame, roof, excavate, do 
carpenter arithmetic, estimate costs, trim, insulate, care for 
tools, etc. They can help you earn more, fast. 
MONEY BACK GUARANTEE-You must be completely 
satisfied with the Audel Guides you order, or you may return 
them within 10 days and get your money back. 

I SEND COUPON TODAY 1 

I Theodore Audel & Co.. 4300 West 62nd St. C-Ol 3 

Indianapolis. Indiana 46268 

Please mail me Carpenters and Builders Library, 4 vols. 

I agree to mail $3 in ID days and to mail Vj the total 

purchase price 30 days later, with the balance plus 

shipping costs to be mailed within another 30 days. 

If I am not completely satisfied I may return the books 

for refund. 



Name- 



City- 



_2ip_ 



, Save shipping costs. Enclose $18.50 (plus 
I sales tax, if any) and we pay postage. I 




This point 
lets you bore 
holes up to IV2 

with small electric drill 



II ITS HOLLOW GROUND to bore 
^ cleaner, faster at any angle 

Now s+ep-up the boring range of 
your small elec+ric cJrlil or drill 
press to I '/2" ^'"^^ irwln Speed- 
bor "88" wood bits. ^4" shank 
chuclcs perfectly. No wobble. No 
run-out. Sharp cutting edges on 
exclusive hollow ground point 
start holes faster, let spade type 
cutters bore up to 5 times faster. 
You get clean, accurate holes in 
any wood at any cutting angle. 
Each Irwin Speedbor "88" 
forged from single bar of finest 
tool steel. Each machine-sharp- 
ened and heat tempered full 
length for long life. 17 sizes, '/(" 
to l'/2". ^nd sets. See your Irwin 
hardware or building supply 
dealer soon. 



/ 



IRWIN 



SPEEDBOR '-88' 
WOOD BITS 



at Wilmington. Ohio. Since 1885 



JANUARY, 1973 



27 



A 

Hammer 

is a 
Hammer 





HANDLE 




■ The average American house- 
holder and many do-it-yourselfers 
own only one hammer — usually a 
nail or claw hammer. They use this 
tool for every hammering operation 
from driving nails and striking cold 
chisels and punches to chipping con- 
crete. Poor workmanship and ex- 
tremely hazardous! 

A recent booklet prepared by the 
Service Tools Institute illustrates 
and defines the proper use of 13 dif- 
ferent hammer types, each designed 
for specific use. Nail hammers, for 
example, are designed for driving 
common and finishing nails and 
nail sets, using the center of the ham- 
mer face. The claws are for pulling 
common and finishing nails and rip- 
ping woodwork, and should never be 
struck against metal. 

Every mechanic, amateur or pro- 
fessional, should have a light ball 
pein hammer and a heavy ball pein, 
blacksmith's or hand drilling ham- 
mer. He will use the heavy hammers 
for striking cold chisels, star drills 
and large punches and for straight- 
ening and shaping metal. He will 
use the lighter ball pein on prick 
punches and in light metalworking 
operations. Nail hammers should 
never be used for these purposes 
since the face may chip and pos- 
sibly result not only in damage to 
the hammer but also in eye or other 
bodily injury. 

Other hammer types include the 
following: Riveting and Setting ham- 
mers. The riveting hammers are 
used by machinists and tinners for 
driving and spreading rivets; the set- 
ting hammers, for various sheet met- 



FACEv 




FACE' 






V/ood pioiKc faced Coppe, 



al operations. Chipping hammers, 
for chipping welds, rust, paint, etc., 
from metal. Bricklayers' hammers, 
for setting and cutting bricks, ma- 
sonry tile and concrete blocks and 
for chipping mortar from bricks. 

Soft Face hammers and mallets, 
for striking blows where steel ham- 
mers would mar or damage the tool 
or the surface being struck. 

Magnetic hammers, for holding 
and driving tacks. Body and Fender 
hammers, for bumping and dinging 
in the repair of automobile bodies 
and fenders. Blacksmiths' or Engi- 
neers hammers and Sledges, for gen- 
eral sledging operations in striking 
wood and metal, striking spikes, 
stakes, cold chisels, rock drills, etc. 
Stone Sledges and Spalling hammers. 
Sledges are for breaking stone and 
concrete; spalling hammers, for cut- 
ting and shaping stone and concrete. 
Hand Drilling or Mash hammers, 
for use with cold chisels, brick chis- 
els, star drills, etc. Bush hammers, 
for roughing and chipping concrete. 

Why so many difierent hammers? 
Simply that the intended use dictates 
the design, configuration, choice of 
material, forging method and heat 
treatment of each type. Each type is 
different in some respects. That's 
why you foster accident and injury 
when you abuse a good tool through 
improper use. Proper use of prac- 
tically all types involves certain 
basic rules: 

(1) A hammer blow should always 
be struck squarely with the ham- 
mer face parallel with the surface 
being struck. Always avoid glanc- 
ing blows and over and under 
strikes. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



Fair Blow 




(2) When striking another tool (cold 
chisel, punch, wedge, etc.), the 
face of the hammer should be 
proportionately larger than the 
head of the tool. For example, a 
14 -inch cold chisel requires at 
last a 1-inch hammer face. 

(3) Always use a hammer of suitable 
size and weight for the job. Don't 
use a tack hammer to drive a 
spike, nor a sledge to drive a tack. 

(4) Never use one hammer to strike 
another hammer. 

(5) Never use a striking or struck tool 
with a loose or damaged handle. 

(6) Discard any striking or struck 
tool if the face shows excessive 
wear, dents, chips, mushrooming 
or improper redressing. 

(7) Never redress hammers without 
proper redressing instructions. 

In addition to the above basic 
rules, safe use of nearly all striking 
tools requires the wearing of safety 
goggles. Tiie exceptions are soft face 
and tack hammers. Driving hard- 
ened steel-cut and masonry nails is 
particularly hazardous. They should 
never be driven with a nail hammer. 
These nails shatter under the force 
of an indirect or glancing blow and 
should never be driven unless safety 
goggles are worn. When not driven 
through a piece of wood, a hole 
should be started with a small star 
drill or masonry bit. A heavy ham- 
mer with a large striking face is the 
proper tool to use. ■ 

Copies of the booklet "Proper 
Uses and Common Abuses of Strik- 
ing and Struck Tools may be ob- 
tained by sending 25^ to the Service 
Tools Institute, 331 Madison Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. 10017. 



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Contractors, 
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You start large or small — put in a full day 
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Send Free Booklet today. 



_2ip Code— 



JANUARY, 1973 



29 




GOSSIP 



SEND YOUR FAVORtTES TO: 

PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONSTITUTION 

AVE. NW, WASH., D.C. 20001. 

SORRY, BUT NO PAYMENT MADE 

AND POETRY NOT ACCEPTED. 



No Alore Weapons.' 

You know why kids are stepping 
out of line a lot nowadays? Pop has 
run out of weapons. The electric 
razor took away his razor strap. Cen- 
tral heating took away his woodshed. 
Tax worries took away his hair and 
he threw away his hairbrush! — Lav/- 
rence L. Wood, Stacy, Minn. 

LIKE TOOLS, BE SHARP & SAFE 




Caught Red-Handed? 

One of the guys from our local 
union is in the hospital with knee 
trouble. It seems his wife found a 
redhead on it. 

UNION DUES BUY RAISES 

Pun Fun 

A man sent his son to the drug- 
store to buy a copy of "Of Human 
Bondage." "Get yourself a soda 
while you're there," he told his boy. 
At the drugstore, the kid did as he 
was told but sat the book and soda 
on the counter. As he -wandered 
through the store, somebody stole 
them both. The boy started to cry 
and the owner Inquired, "What's the 
matter, son?" 

Through his tears, the boy replied, 
"I've lost my Maugham and pop!" 




A Grave Situation Solved 

Where there's a will there's a way. 
One young couple with two young- 
sters couldn't find a place to rent: 
nobody wanted to take children. Fi- 
nally, they took the kids to a nearby 
cemetery while they went apartment 
hunting. They found one they liked. 
Sure enough, the manager asked, "Do 
you have children?" 

"Yes, we do," honestly replied the 
husband, "but they are both out in 
the cemetery." 

The manager expressed sorrow, 
signed the lease, the couple went 
back to the cemetery, picked up the 
kids, moved In and lived quite hap- 
pily. — John Vale, Sunnyvale, Wash. 

LOOK FOR THE UNION LABEL 

A Tart Reply? 

A dietician protested to a baker 
that the sign In his window was un- 
truthful. It said: "The pastries In this 
window are non-fattening." 

"I know for a fact that such pastries 
are fattening," she declared. 

"The sign is right," fired back the 
baker. "So long as the pastries stay 
in my window, they're non-fattening! " 

BUY AT UNION RETAIL STORES 

Whyizzit? 

Whyizzit that, when we disagree 
with today's kids, it's "lack of com- 
munication." But when they disagree 
with their elders, it's "meaningful 



di 



alogue.' 



This Month's Limerick 

An Ingenious young boatman named 

Park 
Built a sailboat resembling The Ark. 

So he wasn't astounded 

Nor even confounded 
When the Crow's Nest became the 

home of a lark. 

— Edward Fors, Chicago, III. 



Hearing No Evils! 

"Your hearing loss is getting 
worse," the doctor told the old man. 
"You're going to have to cut out 
smoking, drinking and running around 
with wild women!" 

The old man let It soak in awhile 
before he answered: "I can't hear 
you. Doc, and I don't think I could 
hear you, no matter how loud you 
talk!" 

R U A UNION BOOSTER.* 

No Solution! 

On the first day of school, the 
teacher told her kindergarten class: 
"Now if you have to go to the bath- 
room, you will hold up two fingers. " 

From the back of the room came a 
puzzled: "I don't see how that's go- 
ing to help any!" 

WORK SAFELY— ACCIDENTS HURT 




He Was Teed OfF/ 

By the time a golfer can afford not 
to worry about losing balls, he can't 
hit 'em that far! 

TAKE PART IN UNION AFFAIRS 

A Fitting Tradition 

When the groom asked his new 
bride why she cut the ends off her 
ham before she baked It, she said, 
"That's the way mother did it." At 
the next visit of his mother-in-law he 
asked her. She replied, like her daugh- 
ter, "That's the way my mother did 
it." 

Some time later, when they visited 
Grandma, he asked her why she had 
cut the ends off the ham. "I had a 
small baking pan and that was the 
only way I could make It fit," ex- 
plained the old lady. 

ALWAYS C D UNION LABEL 

Down-to-Earth Salesman 

The all-time best record for a sales- 
man was set by the men's clothing 
store salesman who waited on a widow 
buying a burial suit for her late hus- 
band. He sold her a suit with two 
pairs of pants. 



30 



THE CARPENTER 




LOW SCAFFOLDING 




The Simple Way Sciilfolding was 
designed to be more rigid, more versatile, 
and reduce the time required to build and 
dismantle and to reduce bulk and weight 
for easier handling and transportation. 
Developed primarily for use by home- 
builders and general carpenters, it is de- 
signed for relatively low-level installa- 
tions. 

Each unit of this scaffolding support 
consists of two horizontal arms, one 
bolt, and one handle nut. To erect 
this scaffold, first snap a chalk line the 
entire length of wall at the desired 
height of walk boards. For each unit, 
drive 2 — 16 d. comm. nails, one at each 
stud at chalk line height. (Any two studs 
maximum 24" o.c.) Leave the heads stick- 
ing out Vi inch. Hook the feet of the 
arms on the nails through the key hole 
slot. Place a 2"x4" leg from the ground 
to between the arms, outside the bolt 
if feet are 16" o.c. or greater. Inside 
or between the bolt and wall if the feet 
are less than 16" o.c. Raise arms to 
level and tighten handle nut to secure 
arms to leg. Finish driving the nails 
home to reduce side play to nil. Place 
walk boards on arms. 

The weight break down of the fasten- 
ing varies with the spacing of the feet; 
Continued on Page 33 




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Find out about Chicago Tech's get-ahead 
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Name . 



.Age . 



Address _ 



City. 



. State . 



. Zip_ 



Occupation . 



JANUARY, 1973 



31 



\jmm Aluminum Box Mfg. 



Cusick, Wash. 99119 U.S.A. 



Phone (509) 445-2541 



Portable Tool Box for Carpenters 

This carpenter tool box is for the man who cares about his toots. 




Pat. No. 3549064 



Belts on Box for Climbing 



The tool box is made from 0.63 heavy gauge aluminum. The 
corners are heliarc welded for strength. It has double latches which 
can be padlocked and heavy duty fiberglass handle. 

It is designed for all carpenters. It holds a complete line of any 
major brand of hand tools. This tool box can be carried anywhere 
like a suitcase with tools staying in place. The back pack feature is 
for men working in high places, enabling them to use both hands 
for climbing. It is very compact and easy to use. 

ihis box will give you years ot service. All tools can be seen at a 
glance and easily removed, saving on tool losses. It is 14 in. wide, 
34 in. long and 4 in. thick. 

List of Tools This Box will Hold 



2 Hand Saws 

1 Hammer 

1 25, 50 or 100 ft. Tape 

1 6 to 16 ft. Tope 

1 Wood Rule 

1 Keyhole Saw 

1 Comb, Square 

Pencils 

Nail Punches 
1 Chalk Box 

1 6 or 7 in. Block Plane 
1 Plumb Bob 

Chisels 
1 24 or 28 in. Level 
1 2 ft. Framing Square 

All spaces for toois ore clearly iabeled 



1 Sweep Brace 

Chalk Line 
1 10 or 12 in. Crescent Wrench 
1 Hatchet 
1 Side Cutter 
1 Vise Grip 
1 18 in. Pry Bar 
1 Noil Claw 
1 24 in. Extension Bit 
1 Expansion Bit 
13 Wood Bits. 1 in. to 14 in. 
1 Bevel Squce 

Screw Drivers 
1 Small Tin Snip 



Too! Box without Tools $38.50 □ 

1 Set Bock Pack Belts 3.50 G 

Postage & handling 3.50 Q 

Washington residents add 5% sales tax [U 

Total for order Q 

[J I enclose amount in full. 
[ I Charge my account No. . 
Q BankAmericard 



Date. 



□ Mastercharge 



Name . 



Address. 



City. 



State Zip Code . 



Unconditional 10-day money back guarantee. Guarantee for 1 year. 

Tool Box only. All orders shipped within 2 weeks parcel post. 

Makes on excellent gift for Holidays & Special Occasions. Prices 
subject to change without notice. 



Arkansas Local Exhibits 
At Craighead County Fair 

II 




mknAoK 




Members of Local 1440, Jonesboro, Ark., recently promoted 
their craft and their year-round program in a most effective 
way. They installed an exhibit at the Craighead County Fair, 
and, in collaboration nith their ladies auxiliary, they discussed 
person-to-person with fair visitors the work of organized labor 
in Arkansas. 

Two of the men who worked at the booth are shown above: 
C. H. Tolbert, left, business representative of Local 1440, and, 
right. Joint Representative P. A. Brewer. 

In the picture below is a general view of the displays, 
showing tools and door prizes. The large metal tool box in 
the foreground was a grand prize. 




APPRENTICE WINNER TOUR 

Continued from Page 9 

ranged for the winners to learn more about forest 
management and wood products manufacturing. After 
the tour the winners flew south for a two-day visit 
in New Orleans. 

This was the second year the National Forest Prod- 
ucts Association and forest industry companies have 
sponsored tours for the top winners of the Carpenter 
Apprenticeship Contest. The 1972 contest was held in 
Las Vegas, Nev., August 24-25. Materials used in 
the contest were supplied by the Southwest Pine Asso- 
ciation, Phoenix, Arizona. ■ 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



WHAT'S NEW 

Continued from Page 31 

the strongest is 16" o.c, the weakest is 
24" o.c. The weakest point of this sup- 
port unit is half way between the wall 
and the leg, 22" from the wall. Do not 
exceed 225 lbs. each arm; 450 lbs. per 
unit if both feet are level and walk 
boards extend across both arms. 

To dismantle, remove walk boards, 
loosen handle nut and remove leg. Press 
down on outer end of arms to backout 
nails, lift arms from nails. 

The weight of each unit is 11 lbs. The 
price of each unit is SI 2.45 plus freight 
and/or sales tax. May be purchased from 

C. E. McAllister Construction, P. O. Box 
26, Reelsville. Indiana 46171. (McAllis- 
ter is a member of Local 1217, Ind.) 

METRSC CONVERSION CARD 

The use of the metric system of meas- 
urement is increasing in the United 
States. As a result many persons fre- 
quently need to convert from customary 
to metric units and vice versa. The Na- 
tional Bureau of Standards has prepared 
a plastic metric conversion pocket card, 
which contains the minimum data need- 
ed for such conversions. One side gives 
the factors for converting from custom- 
ary to metric units of length, area, vol- 
ume, mass (weight), and temperature. 
The other side gives the corresponding 
conversion factors for going from metric 
to customary. The most widely used 
units are included and are accompanied 
by their accepted symbols. In addition, 
there is a centimeter scale along one 
edge of the card, an inch scale along 
another edge, and a direct-readout scale 
for converting from Fahrenheit to Cel- 
sius (Centigrade) temperatures and vice 
versa. All numbers are given to two- 
figure accuracy, sufficient for everyday 
practical needs. 

This is National Bureau of Standards 
Special Publication 365, a wallet card, 
issued July 1972; 10 cents each, $6.25 
per 100. Order PREPAID from the 
Superintendent of Documents, U. S. 
Government Printing Office. Washington, 

D. C. 20402, or loc~al U. S. Department 
of Commerce Field Offices as SD Cata- 
log No. €13.10:365. 



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Name 

Address . 
City 



State . 



.Zip. 



JANUARY, 1973 



33 






CONTRIBUTIONS 


Local 


State 


Amount 


Local 


State 


Amount 


Local 


State .<Vmount 


(Nov 


15. 1972 through Dec. 


742 


Decatur 


$ 3.00 




MISSOURI 






OREGON 






15, 1972) 




1361 


Chester 


20.00 


945 


Jefferson City 


S 13.00 


1020 


Portland S 


30.00 


Local 


State 


Amount 


1784 
2087 


Chicago 
Crystal Lake 


35.00 
5.00 


1987 


St. Charles 


24.00 


1277 
2416 


Bend 
Portland 


5.00 
3.00 


857 


ARIZONA 

Tucson 


S 70.00 


3241 


INDIANA 

Covington 


7.00 


1172 
2685 


MONTANA 

Billings 
Missoula 


9.00 
10.00 


2942 


Albany 
PENNSYLVANIA 


18.00 


586 

642 

929 

1140 

1280 


CALIFORNIA 

Sacramento 
Richmond 
Los Angeles 
San Pedro 
Mountain View 


361.00 
10.00 
10.00 
68.00 
30.00 


106 


IOWA 

Des Moines 


2.00 


1881 


NEBRASKA 

Fremont 


3.00 


122 
129 
261 


Philadelphia 

Hazleton 

Scranton 


60.00 

8.00 

100.00 


308 
1260 
1948 


Cedar Raids 
Iowa City 
Ames 


40.00 
21.00 
15.00 


921 


NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Portsmouth 10.00 


287 
401 
454 


Harrisburg 

Pittston 

Philadelphia 


216.00 

20.00 

280.00 


1335 


Wilmington 


21.00 




KANSAS 






NEW JERSEY 




462 


Greensburg 


20.00 


1381 
1607 

2048 
2078 
2185 
2882 


Woodland 

Los Angeles 

Corona 

Vista 

A. V. Palmdale 

Santo Rosa 


11.00 
40.00 
20.00 
13.00 
5.00 
1.00 


168 
499 


Kansas City 
Leavenworth 


18.00 
10.00 


23 
299 


Dover 
Union City 


35.00 
40.00 


1798 


SOUTH CAROLINA 

Greenville 16.00 


1224 


Emporia 


20.00 


1006 


New Brunswick 


50.00 








1724 


Liberal 

KENTUCKY 


20.00 


1489 
1493 
2250 


Burhngton 
Pompton Lakes 
Red Bank 


300.00 
15.00 
93.00 


213 
1884 


TEXAS 

Houston 
Lubbock 


30.00 
13.00 




COLORADO 




64 


Louisville 


20.00 




NEW YORK 

Buffalo 










1583 


Englewood 


2.00 


712 


Covington 


25.00 


355 


20.00 




WASHINGTON 




2249 
79 


Adams Co. 

CONNECTICUT 

New Haven 

DELAWARE 


15.00 
59.00 


1811 
1897 

340 


LOUISIANA 

Monroe 
Lafayette 

MARYLAND 

Hagerstown 


20.00 
83.00 

20.00 


488 
608 
1397 
1704 
2163 
2765 


New York 
New York 
North Hempstead 
Carmel Kent 
New York 
Nassau Co. 


40.00 
75.00 
204.00 
8.00 
41.00 
20.00 


131 

470 

562 

756 

1148 

1532 

1715 


Seattle 

Tacoma 

Everett 

BiUingham 

Olympia 

Anacortes 

Vancouver 


17.00 
13.00 
10.00 
10.00 
20.00 
4.00 
10.00 


1545 


Wilmington 


20.00 










OHIO 




2633 


Tacoma 


2.00 










MASSACHUSETTS 








3099 


Aberdeen 


10.00 


DISTRICT OF COLLMBIA 

132 Washington. D.C. Kl.OO 


32 
656 


Springfield 
Holyoke 


10.00 
16.00 


105 
171 
254 


Cleveland 

Youngstown 

Cleveland 


4.00 

35.00 

6.00 




WEST VIRGINIA 






FLORIDA 






MICHIGAN 




650 
892 


Pomeroy 
Youngstown 


30.00 
3.00 


428 

2427 


Fairmont 
White Sulphur 


31.00 


959 


Boynton 


1.00 


1191 


Lansing 


20.00 


940 


Sandusky 


10.00 




Springs 


13.00 


1308 


Lake Worth 


20.00 




MINNESOTA 




1108 
1629 


Cleveland 
Ashtabula 


15.00 
2.00 




WISCONSIN 






ILLINOIS 




7 


Minneapolis 


13.00 


1720 


Athens 


6.00 


161 


Kenosha 


15.00 


63 


Bloomington 


3.00 


87 


St. Paul 


23.75 








252 


Oshkosh 


2.00 


80 


Chicago 


158.00 


307 


Winona 


3.00 




OKLAHOMA 




1143 


La Crosse 


5.00 


558 


Elmhurst 


34.00 


649 


Crookston 


10.00 


1060 


Norman 


15.00 


1733 


Marshfield 


1.00 


644 


Pekin 


200.00 


766 


Albert Lea 


1.00 


1659 


Bartlesville 


10.00 


2073 


Milwaukee 


5.00 



Who Remembers 

The Water 

Wheel? 

We would like for someone to 
build a minature model of the old 
original ""Waterwheel-Powered 
Grist Mill." according to the origi- 
nal plans. Anyone v\ illing to pursue 
this project, please contact Charles 
Allen of the Apprenticeship De- 
partment of the U.B.C. & J. of A. 

We plan to use this model in an 
exhibit to illustrate how technol- 
ogy has changed the skills of the 
Millwright. 



Safety Conference 
Re-Elects Connelley 

The Labor Conference of the Na- 
tional Safety Council meeting in 
Chicago, III., recently re-elected 
Paul H. Connelley. safety director 
of the Brotherhood, vice president 
for labor of the NSC. 

Connelley has been active in the 
work of the National Safety Coun- 
cil for many years, serving as a 
leader of the Labor Conference in 
several capacities. 

Conference delegates also elected 
William McCullouah of the Cana- 



dian Union of Public Employes as 
chairman. He succeeds Edward J. 
Legan of the International Brother- 
hood of Electrical Workers. 

Dale Marr of Operating Engi- 
neers Local 3 in San Francisco was 
elected vice chairman to succeed 
McCullough. All terms of office are 
for one year. 



TALK UP 



WOOD 



34 



THE CARPENTER 



Meany Presses For Equity 
Or Abolition of Controls 

Economic controls should either 
be made fair and equitable or com- 
pletely abolished, AFL-CIO Pres. 
George Meany declared, last month. 

Meanwhile, Treasury Secretary 
George P. Shultz, the Administra- 
tion's chief economic spokesman, 
served notice that the President will 
ask Congress to extend stabilization 
powers beyond Apr. 30. That's the 
date the law authorizing wage-price 
controls is scheduled to expire. 

Shultz promised that the Admin- 
istration will engage in a "wide 
process of consultation"" with labor, 
management and members of Con- 
gress to seek recommendations for 
improving the present program. 

Meany said he welcomed the as- 
surance that labor and other groups 
will be consulted on changes in the 
program. 

But he stressed that "in the con- 
templated discussions, the first prior- 
ity must be on achieving equity. 
Without equity, there should be no 
extension of controls."' 



The AFL-CIO president made it 
clear that labor has not softened its 
criticism of the present wage-price 
controls program. 

"Workers' wages have been strin- 
gently controlled while the prices of 
everything they buy continue to rise 
and the profits of their employers 




//)/?<- S'^-i''.''^ 



"Which are you now".' Chairnian of 
thi' harfiainiiiij; or jtrievaiue fom- 
mittee'.'"' 



have been allowed to skyrocket," he 
said. 

Meany said the AFL-CIO be- 
lieves "the stabilization program 
can — and should — be made fair, 
equitable and across-the-board on 
all prices, costs and incomes, in- 
cluding profits, as well as wages and 
salaries with adequate exemption 
for the wages of the working poor. 
If that equity is not achieved, we 
believe controls should be abol- 
ished." 

Carpenter-Installed 
Ceilings System Note 

Since the publication of the arti- 
cle in the November issue of The 
Carpenter entitled, "New Chicago- 
Based Ceilings System Proving 
Popular," many readers have writ- 
ten to us asking for the address of 
the firm handling these installations, 
so that they might obtain more in- 
formation. 

We suggest you write to M. Ecker 
& Co., 5374 N. Elston Avenue. 
Chicago. 111. 60630. The telephone: 
(312) 685-5500. 



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JANUARY, 1973 



35 



fie Better Informed! 

Work Better! Earn More! 

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SIGMON'S 

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and STEEL SQUARE" 



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DICTIONARY 

This is the T 5th of Cf new feature series planned to keep you better 
informed on the meaning of terms related to collective bargaining, 
union contracts, and union business. Follow it closely, and your union 
membership v/ill become more meaningful, and your ability to partici- 
pate in decisions which affect your future and security will be strength- 
ened. It was compiled by the International Labor Press Assn., and is 
used with permission. 



R 

reopeiier: A provision calling for reopening a current contract at a 

specified time for negotiations on stated subjects such as a wage 

increase, pension, health and welfare, etc. 
representation election: A vote to determine whether a majority of 

the workers in a unit want to be represented by a given union. 
salaried workers: Those whose pay is a stated sum per week. 
"right-to-work" laws: State legislation which outlaws the union shop. 

See Section 14-B. 
rotating shift: Rotation of crews, usually to distribute day and 

night work on equal basis. 
runaway shop: An enterprise which moves to another city, area or 

state to escape the union. 
run-off election: Conducted when no party has won a majority in 

the first vote. 



scab: A worker in a struck plant, specifically one who fills the job 
of a striker; or a worker who continues on the job during a strike. 

scientific management: See industrial engineering. 

seasonal unemployment: Joblessness due to seasonal nature of the 
work — construction, farming and lumber are examples. 

secondary strike: Called against an employer doing business with 
another whose workers are on strike. 

Section 14-B: A Taft-Hartley Act provision permitting states to 
outlaw the union shop, even though federal law does not. See 
"right-to-work" laws. 

seniority: The employee's length of service as a factor in determin- 
ing employment rights as to iayoff^, vacations, rates of pay, etc. 

severance benefits: Wages or other rights accruing to an employee 
on leaving employment, varying according to contractually-nego- 
tiated conditions. 

sex differential: Difference in rates for work of comparable quality 
and quantity, based on the worker's sex. Now generally forbidden 
by federal law. 

shape-up: In maritime industry, line-up of men seeking work, with 
steamship or stevedoring companies selecting the men they want. 

share-the-work: Spreading of employment by shortening the work 
week for the entire employee group, instead of laying off some. 



36 



THE CARPENTER 




H mo R T72CWr 



L.U. NO. 1 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Andeison. William 
Koeller, Alfred E. 
Leith, Joseph 
Reck, Herman 
Schillins;, O. W. 
Swanson, Bror S. 

L.U. NO. 4 
DAVENPORT, IOWA 

Dalton. Kenii.th 

L.U. NO. 7 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Burkland, Elmer C. 
Dybvig, S. H. 
Kiikowski, Jacob 
Riedel, John K. 

L.U. NO. 13 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Chimmenski, Jake 
Flynn, Kevin V. 
Johnson, Swan 
Lynn, Earl W. 
McAdams. I3avid H. 
Martins, E nar 
Perrone. Pal 
Powell, Maynard S. 
Scannell, James R. 
Serenda, I'ed A. 
Smith, Christian 
Winter, B:II R. 

L.U. NO. 15 
HACKENSACK, N.,L 

Kuhnert, Richard 
Odegaard, Arthni 

L.U. NO. 18 
HAMILTON, ONT. 

Jackson. Harry R. 
Kowalski, Julian 
Thompson, Edward 

L.U. NO. 22 
SAN FRANCISCO, 
CALIF. 

Brittain, Jack 
Burba, John J. 
Burkart, Max 
Casassa. George 
Cassar, Harry 
Cranton, Herbert R. 
Dahlberg, Harry 
Donohiie, Charles T. 
Duff, Herman L. 
Emanuelson, John 
Erickson, Elmer 
Ghieimelti, James 
Gmelner, Leo L. 
Godin, George 
Hanson, Sidney F. 
Hester. Joe M. 
H'pshar, Otis L. 
Hoiigey. J. C. 
lo'.'s, Alexandre 
Jennints, Al 
Kanneni'cisjr, John H. 
Kemmerlln"., Edwaiil P. 
Laii:;hl n. H. E. 
Lnstenberg. ]>aiil J. 
Mathis, Arthur C. 
Meyers, George E. 
Mosley. Frank 
Munson, Thomas E. 
Nelson, Lyle H. 
Odmann, R. 
Pearson, Connie 



Perruquet, Virgil 
Peterson, Arvid 
Petroni. Tony 
Phillips. Earl B. 
Rcdka, Steve 
Root. Jack I,. 
Sammon, William 
Smith, Leo Carl 
Van Dusen, R. L. 
W'elch. Roy 

I .U. NO. 30 

NEW LONDON, CONN. 

Benham, Tryon G. 
Brailsford. Arthur, Jr. 
McQueen, Daniel C. 
Panciera. Raymond, Sr, 

L.U. NO. 40 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Dugas, Philip 
Gillis, Leonard 
Kilpatrick. Elson 

L.U. NO. 46 
SAULT STE. MARIE, 
MICH. 

Loiuids, William E. 
Payment. George H. 

L.U. NO. 50 
KNOXVILIE, TENN. 

Erye, G. C. 

L.U. .NO. 54 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Blaha, .loseph 
Kolka, Frank 

L.U. NO. 61 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Cleveland, J. E. 
Johnson, Forest D. 

L.U. NO 75 
CHARLESTOWN, R.L 

Chapman. Albert H. 

L.U. NO. 83 
HALIFAX, N.S. 

Home, Harvey S. 

L.U. NO. 88 
ANACONDA, MONT. 

Mannix, Waller 

L.U. NO. 101 
BALTIMORE. MD. 

Farlev. James W. 
McFaddcn, H. T. 
Moran, Martin 

L.U. NO. 104 
DAYTON, OHIO 

DeBord, Claude A. 
Hawker, Ray Pierre 
Quast, Otto 
Reed. Stanley L. 
Rumbold, Archie C. 
Schni'll. Harold 
Shroyer, Dallas 
Simpson, William B. 
Wysong, Glen 

L.U. NO. 109 
SHEFFIELD. ALA. 

McBroom. W. A. 
Sanford, G. H. 



L.U. NO. 129 
HAZLETON, PA. 

Drasher, Elmer 
Durishun, Patrick 
Jenkins, Oliver 

L.U. NO. 131 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

Cooper, P. L. 
Egge, Carl 
Hanson, Selmer 
Harwood. Lytle P. 
McNiven, C. D. 
Oberlander, Fred F. 
Pierce, William E. 

L.U. NO. 132 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Clatterbuck, Randolph J. 
Grimes, Carl C Sr. 
Mauck, Robert Terry 
Morrison. Richard C. 
Slubbs, Sidney C. 

L.U. NO. 133 

TERRE HAUTE, IND. 

Allenbaugh. Lloyd D. 
Reino:hl. Robert 

L.U. NO. 141 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Abbott. Ed 
Baumdicher, Otto 
Bold. George A. 
Egan. Harold W. 
Enquist. Vance 
Johnson, Oscar E. 
Nelson, Maurice 
Olson, Charles Q. 
Peters. Edward 
White. Charles Victor 

L.U. NO. 166 

ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 

Hall. Jack 
Osborne, Grafton V. 

L.U. NO. 174 
JOI.IET, ILL. 

Benson, Kenneth 
Carey, Robert 
Madsen, Carl 
Solopek. John 
Werner, Henry 
White, Powell 

L.U. NO. 181 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Bernett. Charles L. 
Otto. Robert 1. 
Qu iitus, Frank 

L.U. NO. 188 
YONKERS, N.Y. 

Fitzgerald. Eugene 

L.U. NO. 200 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Blose, Ned 
Phelps, Leon D. 

L.U. NO. 218 
BOSION, MASS. 

Antonopoulos, Miltiadcs 
Kerce. Charles 
Mercer. Richard 
Saulnier, Desire 
Thistle, John 



L.U. NO. 226 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Cornwell, Percy 
Dimiolt, Frank B. 
Husbands, Ivan D. 

L.U. NO. 246 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Cimningham, John J. 
Kavanagh, Joseph P. 
Mockovciak, Samuel 

UU. NO. 257 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Coatly, James 
Edstrom, Martin 
Larson, Gustav 

l,.U. NO. 264 
MILWAUKEE, WISC. 

Evenson, Charles 
Hansen, William J. 
Nonn, John 
Prudlow, Alois 
Sierakowski, Michael 
Templeman. Rudolph 
Townsend, Clifford 
Wasielewski, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 299 
FAIRVIEW, N..L 

Buchwald, Manfred 
Ziminski, Walter 

L.U. NO. 301 
NEWBLRGH, N.Y. 

Mehl, Fred 

L.U. NO. 308 

CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA 

Brougher, Adam 
Kiees, Armanil 
Rick, I-inn 
Roman, Leonard 
Silver, James 

L.U. NO. 325 
PAIERSON, N.J. 

Morrison, Robert 
Sloepker, Albert 

L.U. NO. 335 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

Gooder, Merlon 
Sivensen, Sigurd 

L.U. NO. 337 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Austin. Robert 
Casey, Patrick J. 
Dunlap, Ike 
Fiilks, Seamer M. 
Gilbert, Pelei 
McEwen. John 
McGaw, Glenn 
Markiewicz. Bruno 
Martin, Carl L. 
Nasrey, Edward 
Serafyn, Leonly 
Smilh. Du'iald 
White, Alfre<l 
Willenbiack. Arthur 

L.U. NO. 345 
MEMPHIS, TENN. 

Brawner, P. M. 
Brewer, G. F. 
Cowan, J. N. 
Jobe, Jeff C. 



Langston, Charlie E. 
Lemmons, B. G. 
Nabors, Walter 
Nash, R. B. 
Pennington, Terry 
Smith, John D. 
Walton, Terry W. 

L.U. NO. 385 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

DeFavero, Gioachino 
Medic, Joso 
Rosenstein, Harry 

L.U. NO. 403 
ALEXANDRIA, LA. 

Woodruff', Ben D. 

L.U. NO. 422 

NEW BRIGHTON, PA. 

Arnold, Joseph W. 
Braden, George Edward 
Henshaw, Loyal E. 
Holmes, Howard C. 
Logue, William G. 
McElhose, Kay C. 

L.U. NO. 531 

ST. PETERSBl RG, FLA. 

Douglas, Gran D. 

L.U. NO. 627 
JACKSONMI LE, FLA. 

Allbritton, W. T. 
Doane, Roy E. 
Pate, James C. 

L.U. NO. 729 
LIBERTY, N.Y. 

Haiss, Charles E. 
Hodge, Donald 

L.U. NO. 899 
PARKERSBURG, W.VA. 

Gabriel, C. M. 

L.U. NO. 948 
SIOUX CITY, IOWA 

Eisele, Vernon 

L.U. NO. 950 
NEW YORK, N.Y'. 

Carlson, John 
Wrobble, E. 

L.U. NO. 982 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Neil, Wilton 

L.U. NO. 1138 
TOLEDO, OHIO 

DiNardo, Sam 

L.U. NO. 1164 
NEW YORK, N.Y'. 

Alt, John 
Angello. Accursio 
Butera. Peter 
Horwitz, Herman 
Macaluso, Joseph 
Malinskas, Peter 
Pashwa, Joseph 
Ricciardi, Domenico 
Stockmal. John 



.lANUARY, 1973 



37 



IN MEMORIAM 

Continued from Page 37 



L.L'. NO. 1274 
DECATUR, ALA. 

Fuller, John E. 
Joiner, Charlie F. 
Kyle, Allen W. 

L.U. NO. 1313 
MASON CIT\, IOWA 

Olson, William E. 

L.U. NO. 1367 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Mermeistein, Abraham 

L.U. NO. 1394 

FT. LAUDERDALE, FLA 

Thompson, Fabian 

L.U. NO. 1508 
LYONS, N.Y. 
Beader, Paul L. 
Schinsing, Winfred 

L.U. NO. 1518 
GULFPORT, MISS. 

Parker, L. A. 

L.U. NO. 1616 
NASHUA, N.H. 

Chartier, Raymond 

L.U. NO. 1772 
HICKSVILLE, N.Y. 

Sturm, Alanson 
Taylor, Frank 



L.U. NO. 1784 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Albert, John 
Rosenmayer. Rudolph 

L.U. NO. 1914 
PHOENLX, ARIZ. 

Todd, Vernon R. 
Wright, Russell L. 

L.U. NO. 2012 
SEAFORD, DEL. 

Dunn, Andrew 

L.U. NO. 2028 
GRAND FORKS, N.D. 

Mattson, Vernon 
Ramsrud, Marvel 

L.U. NO. 2084 
ASTORIA, ORE. 

Hillard, Joseph L. 

L.U. NO. 2117 
FLUSHING, N.Y. 

Ansaldi, Frank 
Attubato, Salvatore 
Balens. Janis 
DeFranza, Anthony 
Fritzson, Joseph 
GeipsI, William 



Guerra, Robert 
Koch, Arthur 
Lunner. Oluf 
Schindler, Albert 
Tobiason, Tobias 
Tommiska, Anton 

L.U. NO. 2203 
ANAHEIM, CALIF. 

Alexander, D. E. 
Harkins, Ted 
Johnson, Gust L. 



Nixon, Ralph Claude 
Osgood, Henry 
Winn, Virgil 
L.U. NO. 2311 

WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Kreps, Glen 
L.U. NO. 2582 

MUSKEGON, MICH. 

Pettit, James 
White, Leslie 



L.U. NO. 2762 
NORTH FORK, CALIF. 

Caldwell, Henry T. (Hank) 

L.U. NO. 2982 
STAUNTON, VA. 

Gabbert, Melvin W. 
Garrison, Ollie 

L.U. NO. 3154 
MONTICELLO, IND. 

Koons, William B. 



LEGACIES OF LONG SERVICE 

Local 246 of New York City reports the passing, within a one-week period, 
of two of its key leaders: John J. Cunningham, business representative and finan- 
cial secretary for 17 years, and Joseph P. Kavanagh, president and business rep- 
resentative for 10 years. These men were "truly representative of what union 
men stand for," said the Local 246 executive board in reporting their passing. 



Two veteran members of Local 30, New London. Conn., are in our "In 
Memoriam" listing: Daniel Cameron McQueen, financial secretary for more 
than 30 years, and Tryon G. Benham, a member for more than 50 years. 

Benham joined Local 30 on August 19, 1918. McQueen became a member 
on October 13, 1913. Born in Glasgow, Scotland, on Sept. 4, 1884, he came to 
the United States 82 years ago. 

• 

The oldest member of Local 83, Halifax, N.S., died recently. He was Harvey 
S. Home, born August 10, 1875, who joined the carpentry trade at an early age. 
He became a member of Local 83 in 1907 and. after serving on a number of 
committees, he was elected a financial secretary in 1927. a post he held until 
1957. He was then elected treasurer and remained in this position until 1959, 
when he went into full retirement. 

At the time of his death, Brother Home had 65 years of membership in 
cood standinc. 



\V- 






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38 



THE CARPENTER 




Lakeland 
News 



I Items of interest from the Brotherhood's 
retirement home at Lakeland, Florida 



Stephen Schemeck, of Local 81, Erie, buried in the Home Cemetery. 



Pa., died November 1. 1972. 
at Erie. 



Burial was 



Fred Kuepfer, of Local 836, Janesville, 
Wise, died November 19, 1972. He was 



William Peters, of Local 105. Cleve- 
land, Ohio, died November 20, 1972. He 
was buried in the Home Cemetery. 



First State OFCC 
For California 

The U.S. Department of Labor's Office 
of Federal Contract Compliance (OFCC) 
has announced tentative approval of a 
proposal to establish a state-wide affirma- 
tive action plan in California. 

The plan's purpose is to increase em- 
ployment opportunity for minorities in 
California's construction industry by 
providing affirmative action support in 
areas of the state not covered by exist- 
ing plans. 

Final approval of the "California 
Plan" is expected on January 5, if by 
that time it has been signed by a cross- 
section of contractors and unions. 



Trial lesson in 




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Tfie plan will embrace the entire state 
except for those areas in which "home- 
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California would become the first stale 
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.Statewide plans exist in Alaska. .Arizona. 
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INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 




Aluminum Box Mfg 


:?2 


Audel. Theodore 


27 


Belsavv Institute 


Belsciw Power Tools 


35 


Belsaw Sharp-All Co 


l,s 


Chicago Technical College 


.11 


Chicago Technical College .... 


39 


Cline-Sigmon, Publishers 


36 


Contour Saws 


38 


Craftsman Book Co 


16 


DeSoto Tool Co 


39 


Eliason Stair Guage Co 


36 


Estwing Manufacluring 


II 


Foley Manufacluring 


29 
26 

27 


Fugilt Enterprises 


Irwin Auger Bit Co 


Locksmithing Institute 


25 


North American School of 


Drafting 


33 


North American School of 




Surveying 


-'h 


Stanley Works Back Cover 




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JANUARY, 1973 



39 



IN CONCLUSION 



'Too Little And 
Too Late ^ 

ShouldNotBe The 

Record Of The 

Occupational 

Health And 

Safety Program 

WRIST TAPS CANNOT 

ACHIEVE THE OBJECTIVES 

OF THE ACT 



■ In recent months six miners were killed in a 
single mine accident in Canada, several laborers had 
their lives snuffed out in a cave-in on an Illinois 
construction site. In fact, 1500 construction workers 
fell victim to on-site construction accidents during 
the first 10 months of 1972. 

What was done about all these tragedies? The 
answer is, very little. They were investigated and 
investigated and investigated. In a few instances where 
neglect was flagrant, the employer got a tap on the 
wrist. On the whole, the net result was business as 
usual. 

The plain truth of the matter is that government 
in both the United States and Canada seems little dis- 
posed to accord safety laws the attention they deserve. 

Correcting safety hazards often costs money, and 
money is one thing many employers hate to part with, 
even when the health and safety of their workers are 
at stake. 

The callous disregard for on-the-job safety in the 
United States is particularly frightening. 



The Occupational Health and Safety Act of 1970 
envisioned the establishment of a 2,000-man force of 
safety inspectors. To date, barely a quarter of that 
number has been hired, and there is very little pros- 
pect that the original quota will be met in the imme- 
diate future. 

The negative attitude of the Occupational Health 
and Safety Review Commission, which was estab- 
lished as the outgrowth of the 1970 Act, is revealed 
in a news release which the Commission issued on 
November 21, 1972. Rather than warning employers 
that safety standards as defined by the Act would 
have to be met, the news release concentrated on 
allaying the fears of employers that they would be 
harassed to provide the kind of safe working places 
contemplated by the Act. 

President Nixon himself went out of his way to 
issue assurances to business men that the 1970 Safety 
Act would not create any difficult problems for them. 
In a November 7th interview, in answering a question 
as to how he felt about the Health and Safety Act, 
he said in part: 

"The Occupational Safety and Health Act, as it 
passed in 1970, was a compromise. We are making 
every effort to administer that Act in such a way as 
to afford maximum protection to American workers 
, . . the law was intended to protect workers — not 
harass business or impair the ability of business to 
compete in the market place." 

In don't see how the Safety and Health Act can 
be made effective without harassing those who violate 
safety provisions. Unless there are fines or even prison 
sentences for violators who consistently flaunt safety 
rules, the Act cannot help but become meaningless. 

CERTAINLY, THE KIND OF ADVICE which the 
publicity release of the Commission dispenses to busi- 
nessmen fortifies this conclusion. Here are some para- 
graphs taken from the new release: They speak for 
themselves. 

"The Review Commission operates under all the 
judicial traditions of the United States. Due process 
of law has not come to an end with the Occupational 
Safety and Health Act of 1970 as some have errone- 
ously wailed. The employer is assumed to be innocent 
of all charges. The burden of proof is on the Secre- 
tary of Labor; if there is not convincing evidence to 
substantiate the accuracy of the Department's allega- 
tions, out goes the Department's case. Even if the 
Department is able to sustain its case, it is the Judge 
who decides on the penalty. If the Judge decides there 
should be a penalty assessment, he's the one who 
decides what the amount will be. 

"Okay, so it's easy enough to disprove a statement 
that was concocted to be shown false in the first place. 
What has really happened when the employer exer- 
cised his right to contest Labor Department allega- 
tions? 

First of all, most contested cases are settled to 
the satisfaction of the employer before reaching the 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



hearing stage. This can happen in various ways: the 
withdrawal of contest by an employer who decides 
that he actually did violate a standard, by the Labor 
Department upon reaching the conclusion that its 
citation is in error, or by settlement informally be- 
tween the parties before the hearing. 

"OF THE FIRST 70 CASES that have gone through 
the hearing process and for which final orders of the 
Review Commission have been issued, 23 resulted in 
complete dismissal of the citation, usually because the 
Labor Department was unable to sustain, its allega- 
tions with evidence. Seventeen more ended with some 
of the citation items dismissed and/or the elimination 
of all penalties or the assessment of a lesser penalty 
than the Labor Department proposed. Six others re- 
sulted in the assessment of a greater penalty than that 
asked by the Department. That means that in almost 
66% of the cases OSAHRC disagreed with the 
Department of Labor over the charges or penalty 
proposals. Clearly, the Review Commission is no- 
body's rubber stamp. 

"These numbers may or may not be reassuring to 
employers. It might be more meaningful to take a 
look at some individual cases. 

"An illustration of the burden of proof occurred 
in a case involving an Arkansas firm cited by the 
Labor Department after one of its employees was 
killed and two were injured when arches they were 
loading on a flatcar toppled onto them. After hearing 
the Department's case, the Review Commission Judge 
dismissed the citation stating: 

'All the Secretary of Labpr has proven is that an 
accident occurred. This is insufficient to carry the 
burden of proof imposed upon him. A citation 
is issued to force correction of an unsafe or un- 
healthful working condition. If the cause of the 
accident has not been determined, then what is the 
employer to correct? . . . The fact that an accident 
occurred is not in itself proof of a violation.' 

"A case involving a Minnesota contractor demon- 
strated that employers need not fear being penalized 
for honest mistakes or misunderstandings of the law. 
The Labor Department cited the contractor for failing 
to maintain injury and illness records at one of his 
out-of-town job sites. The Review Commission Judge, 
while agreeing that the citation was technically cor- 
rect, took into account the employer's belief that the 
records could be kept at his central office and vacated 
the Department's $300 proposed penalty. 

"Finally, the small business man, even though he 
lacks the batteries of attorneys and technical experts 
of the giant corporations, need never on grounds of 
complexity shy away from challenging a Labor De- 
partment citation he feels is unjustified. 

"A case involving a California boatyard owner, 
who employed only five people, demonstrated that 
Review Commission hearings can be simple. The 
owner, cited for an alleged failure to have a ladder 
handy to assist any employee who might fall into the 



water to get out safely, argued his own case. The 
Labor Department had interpreted the regulation to 
mean that a ladder had to be attached to a dock or 
boat or otherwise in the water. But, in winning his 
case, the employer argued successfully that all the 
standard required was that a ladder be in the vicinity 
and produced witnesses who testified that there was 
one within 30 feet. 

"The whole thrust of the Occupational Safety and 
Health Review Commission is to see that the Job 
Safety Act is enforced in a just and reasonable man- 
ner. As one Review Commission Judge put it in 
dismissing a citation, 'The objective of the Act is not 
to punish the employer, but to assure safe working 
conditions for the worker'." 

^: * * 

I am no expert on the English language, but what 
this news release says to me is: "If you flaunt the law 
you have one chance in three of getting away with it. 
If you get caught, you can appeal and appeal. Besides 
those who couldn't beat the rap only got a nominal 
fine anyhow." « 

It seems to me this bodes no go for establishment 
of safety regulations which can reduce the frightful 
toll of life and limb through needless accidents. ■ 




JANUARY, 1973 



What makes the 
Stanley Powerlockll 
your 



y roweriocK j 

kind of rule? 




Better than ever! New rule 
has a drop-in cartridge for 
changing a broken tape 
right on the job! Easy-read 
Lifeguard® yellow blade 
is Mylar® protected for 
long wear. 



Famous Powerlock feature 
holds blade in place for inside 
reading or layout work. 
Locks, unlocks with the push 
of your thumb. 




"True Zero" hook permits 
precise measurements of 
both outside areas and 
harder-to-get-at interiors. 
Underside of hook is ser- 
rated to grip the blade 
tightly on your work. 



Tension clip on the back of 
your new Powerlock II snaps 
over belt or apron pocket, so 
you can't lose it. 



Obviously, our best-selling rule is handier 
than ever with quick-change, complete drop- 
in replacement blade and spring. 10', 12', 16', 
20' lengths; ^A" wide. Stanley Tools, 
Division of The Stanley Works, New Britain, 
Connecticut 06050. 






STANLEY 



helps vou do things right 



'/'> 



Made" in the U.S.A., of course, by the same Stanley that makes, the finesi power tooi 




The 



I 



FEBRUARY 1973 




Official Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPEIKERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA • FOUNDED 1881 







GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Herbert C. Skinner 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W.. 

Washington, D.C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

William Konyha 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington. D.C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 

Charles E. Nichols 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

M. A. Hutcheson 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First Distinct, Patrick J. Campbell 

130 North Main Street 

New City, Rockland Co., New York 

10956 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

1 30 Mountain Avenue 
Springfield, New Jersey 07081 

Third District, Anthony Ochocki 
18400 Grand River Avenue, 
Detroit, Michigan 48223 

Fourth District, Harold E. Lewis 
2970 Peachtree Rd., N.W., Suite 300 
Atlanta, Ga. 30305 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
2800 Selkirk Drive 
Burnsville, Minn. 55378 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 
Glenbrook Center West — Suite 501 
1140 N.W. 63rd Street 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73116 
Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 
Eighth District, M. B. Bryant 
Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 
2418 Central Avenue 
Windsor, Ontario, Canada 

Tenth District, Eldon T. Staley 
4706 W. Saanich Rd. 
RR #3, Victoria, B. C. 




William Sidell, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

If your local union wishes to list de- 
ceased members in the "In Memoriam" 
page of The Carpenter^ it is necessary 
that a specific request be directed to the 
editor. 



In processing complaints, the only 
names which the financial secretary needs 
to send in are the names of members 
who are NOT receiving the magazine. 
In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. Members who die or are sus- 
pended are automatically dropped from 
the mailing list of The Carpenter. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPEISTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filline out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should he mailed to THE CARPEISTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W.. Washington. D. C. 20001 



NAME. 



Local No 

Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS - 



City 



State 



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THE 



c§/A\E[pc§ra^ 




^UBGR PRESS fe l 

^ g:iaBaiiBHiW |l 



VOLUME XCIII 



No. 2 



FEBRUARY, 1973 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick. Editor 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Coincidence and Political Contributions Charles Nichols 2 

Women in Hard Hats 4 

Socai Security Benefits Are Greater, Too 8 

The Continuing Struggle for Health Security E. G. Marshall 12 

Construction Gets Degree Recognition 16 

Members/Authors, Two Book Reviews 26 

Do's And Don't v/ith Hammered Tools Service Tools Institute 28 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 7 

Canadian Report Morden Lazarus 10 

Service to the Brotherhood 17 

Plane Gossip 25 

Apprenticeship and Training 29 

Local Union News 31 

Your Union Dictionary, No. 16 35 

In Memoriam 36 

What's New? 39 

In Conclusion William Sidell 40 



POSTMASTERS. AnENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER. Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave.. N.W., V/ashirgton, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E., Washington, 0. C. 20018. by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20$ in advance. 

Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

It'll be cold in New England during 
February, according to the Old 
Farmer's Almanac. Abe Weatherwise, 
the almanac's mythical forecaster, 
predicts more than 200 inches of snow 
for the New England mountain areas 
this winter. . . . 

. . . And Abe isn't often wrong, his 
regular readers contend. 

In any case, most small boats will 
be tied up in snug harbors, covered 
with tarpaulins or dry-doclced, until 
the spring thaw . . . weather predic- 
tions or not. 

Almanac weather prophets have a 
hazardous occupation. Centuries ago 
they might be burned at the stake as 
sorcerers, if they were right too often. 
Or they might lose their professional 
status, if they were frequently wrong. 

Patrick Murphy's Weather Almanac 
for 1838 said flatly that January 20 
would be the coldest day of the winter. 
It turned out to be the coldest day 
England had suffered in generations, 
and the 1837-38 season was long 
known as Murphy's Winter. 

Abe Weatherwise predicted rain, 
snow, and hail for July 13, 1816, and 
it did rain, snow, and hail. Actually, 
Abe couldn't claim all the credit: A 
prank-playing typesetter had inserted 
the forecast as a joke. 

NOTE: Readers who would like copies 
of this cover unmarred by a mailing label 
may obtain them by sending 10( in coin 
to cover mailing costs to the Editor, The 
CARPENTER, 101 Constitution Ave., 
N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001. 




Coincidence and Politia 
Seem to Go Hand in Hand 



ii*u»a\MiiMmi»^im{ 




by CHARLES NICHOLS 

General Treasurer and Director, 

Carpenters Legislative Improvement 

Committee 

■ This seems to be an age of 
substantial coincidences. By some 
strange coincidence, all coincidences 
seem to be happening to those who 
need favorable coincidences least. 

The lobby in Washington which 
represents the milk industry failed 
in many efforts to get Department 
of Agriculture approval for a raise 
in the price of milk. These failures 
took place before the lobby decided 
upon a concerted campaign to se- 
cure contributions to the President's 
re-election. The lobby managed to 
dig up better than half a million 
dollars in contributions and, by 
some coincidence or other, approval 
for a hike in mOk prices was forth- 
coming shortly thereafter. One of 



the officials of the milk lobby was 
frank enough to write a letter to 
member associations pointing out 
that political contributions are what 
make the mare go in Washington. 

A tycoon in Minnesota wanted a 
charter for a national bank, but his 
application collected dust in Wash- 
ington for some time. By another 
coincidence, shortly after he made 
a substantial 5-figure donation to 
the Nixon campaign, a charter was 
granted. 

A Chicago multi-millionaire, 
named W. Clement Stone, kicked 
in more than a million dollars to 
President Nixon's re-election cam- 
paign. We sincerely hope that Mr. 
Stone is a public-spirited citizen 
with no axe to grind. But no one 
can blame us if we wonder. Keep 
your eyes peeled for another coin- 
cidence. 



A study of many major contribu- 
tions to the President's re-election 
campaign raises many eyebrows. 

Now there is a mechanism for 
eventually making coincidences hap- 
pen to working people. 

When you received your 1972 
Income Tax blanks early this year, 
the packet contained a little form, 
carrying the number 4875. 

This is the first time that such a 
form has been issued by the federal 
government. What it permits you 
to do is to earmark $1 of the taxes 
you pay to go to the political party 
of your choice. If you file a joint 
return, it will permit you to ear- 
mark an additional dollar for your 
wife. 

The beauty of this program is 
that it does not cost you a cent. 
If you have a rebate coming, the 
one or two dollars you sign up for 



THE CARPENTER 



ontributions 




in Form 4875 will not be deducted 
from the amount. If you owe addi- 
tional money when you make your 
final return for 1972, the additional 
one or two dollars won't be added 
to what you owe. 

Ever since the November 7th 
election, the newspapers have been 
full of stories telling about tremen- 
dous campaign donations made by 
individual citizens and the coinci- 
dences that followed. 

A list of coincidences that fol- 
lowed big contributions is mighty 
long, and there is no use spelling 
them all out. The only conclusion 
that can be drawn is that if millions 
of working people contribute a dol- 
lar each through the use of Form 
4875, some favorable coincidences 
may begin happening for ordinary 
people from here on in. 

By coincidence we may get some 



meaningful tax reform which would 
remove the heavy burden from the 
backs of wage earners and place it 
on the backs of the wealthy, who 
grow richer by the year without 
contributing very much to the ad- 
vancement of mankind. 

By another coincidence, a mean- 
ingful national health program 
might come about if enough $1 and 
$2 contributions develop so that 
candidates do not have to mortgage 
their souls to fat-cat contributors. 

Ditto for better workmen's com- 
pensation, minimum wage, unem- 
ployment insurance, meaningful 
safety supervision, etc., etc., etc. 

Using Form 4875, you can direct 
Internal Revenue to place $1 (or 
$2 on a joint return) in one of 
two types of funds for 1976 presi- 
dential candidates: 



1. You can designate the $1 or 
$2 for a specific political party to 
be used for its presidential candi- 
date in 1976. (You cannot, how- 
ever, single out the contribution for 
a specific candidate.) 

2. You can direct your contribu- 
tion to a nonpartison general ac- 
count for all eligible candidates for 
President. 

Your contibution will not — re- 
peat, will not — cost you a penny. 
It will not be added to what you 
might owe in federal taxes, nor will 
it be deducted from any tax refund 
owed to you. 

This is the first real chance the 
average American has had to take 
financing of presidential politics 
away from the millionaires. It's 
right there in Form 4875. Let's 
make the most of it. ■ 



FEBRUARY, 1973 



WOMEN IN HARD HATS 

The cost of livings 

^ women s liberation/^ and other 

factors propel women into 

the construction trades 



■ A year ago, this month, Mrs. 
Marilyn Beis, 28, picked up her 
lunch pail and tool box and went 
off to work in the Waldon Housing 
Development in Chicago. She spent 
her first day installing cupboard han- 
dles and toilet paper holders. She 
was Chicago's first woman caipenter 
apprentice. 

Last summer, Darlene Wisdom, 
23, became the first female dues- 
paying member of Carpenters Local 
198 in Dallas, Texas. Weighing in at 
110 pounds and standing only 5'4", 
she puts in a full day at high-rise 
construction and hopes to someday 
build "a little wooden house some- 
where up in the mountains." 

Over in the next state, Elizabeth 
Ann Knighten of Monroe, La., be- 
came, two years ago. the first wom- 
an ever to apply for carpenter's 
training in the four-state region of 
Louisiana, Arkansas, Texas, and 
New Mexico, according to the Fed- 
eral Bureau of Apprenticeship and 
Training. When newspaper reporters 
asked her why a pretty girl would 
want to become a carpenter, she an- 
swered, "because Lm a joiner." 
(That was a little inside joke, of 
course. She was sure the reporters 
would not know that her union's full 
name is the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America.) 

Other people wonder why a wom- 
an would want to be a carpenter, 
too, including many members of our 



overwhelmingly-male Brotherhood. 
Blisters and bruised fingers are haz- 
ards of the trade. Bad weather and 
layoffs are to be expected. 

In spite of such drawbacks, how- 
ever, a growing number of women 
is moving into the building trades 
and taking the hard knocks next to 
the experienced journeymen. 

It's the money which attracts 
some. 

'T kind of like the pay,"' says 
Darlene Wisdom. "It's a good trade, 
too." 

The high cost of living and a de- 
sire for the finer things of life causes 
many women to join the work force 
today. Dr. Beverly Duncan of the 
University of Michigan completed a 
survey two months ago in which she 
asked hundreds of women why they 
work. "It's for the money."" most of 
them told her. Moreover, that"s the 
same answer she got 15 years ago, 
when she took a similar sun'ey. 

Some young women enter the 
building trades, however, because 
they like to be outdoors, and not be- 
hind a typewriter. Others join be- 
cause their fathers or other members 
of their families are in construction 
work. Marilyn Beis' grandfather and 
uncle were both carpenters. Amanda 
Lyon of Washington. D.C.. is the 
daughter of a plastering contractor 
and took to construction work early 
in life. 



Many of today's young people are 
re-evaluating occupations, too. 
White collar jobs were considered 
status jobs a generation or two ago. 

Now that modem society is filled 
with keypunch operators and clerk 
typist, many young workers are find- 
ing noble purpose in creative, man- 
ual craft employment. After all, the 
world needs only so many BA de- 
grees in English, History, and Ori- 
ental Literature. Six out of the seven 
women whose pictures appear on 
Page 5 are college graduates who 
switched to carpentry after obtain- 
ing their degrees. And who is to say 
how much a college-trained journey- 
man can contribute to the union and 
the trade? 

It's hard to get an exact figure on 
the number of women in the Broth- 
erhood. A few months ago, a re- 
searcher came up with a figure of 
16,000. A spot check of regional 
offices indicate many more — and the 
total is growing steadily. Curves 
Sinunons, Jr.. director of the South- 
west regional office, estimates about 
2,500 in his area alone. There are 
thousands more in plants of the 
South and Northwest. 

Of course, most of this number is 
employed in industrial plants and 
not in craft work. They help to pro- 
duce plywood, parquet flooring, 
overhead doors, kitchen cabinets, 
fixtures, furniture, and mobile homes 
Continued uii page 6 



THE CARPENTER 




WOMEN IN CARPENTRY— The young women shown above are typical of the 
small number now finding work in the craft. At the top, Amanda Lyon, 26, finds 
herself the lone female in a training class operated by the DC-Md.-Va. Joint Ap- 
prenticeship Council. At center left, Mrs. Jeanne McCullum receives her member- 
ship card in Carpenters Local 49 of Lowell, Mass., the first woman to join this local 
union. At center, right, Karen Claffy, 18, of Springfield, Va., an apprentice, at work 
on the stands for the recent inaugural of President Nixon in Washington. At bottom 
left, Mrs. Marilyn Beis on her way to work as Chicago's first woman carpenter. She's 
an apprentice in the Chicago JAC. At bottom right, Nancy Faries, 22, of Virginia 
has a BA degree in English but finds better pay and more satisfying work in the trade. 




Boss of a 
Piledriving Crew 



Debbie Henry (center, above) is a 
cinch to stump ttie "What's My Line?" 
panel any time she tries. 

Not many 24-year-old college grad- 
uates of pretty face and pleasing fig- 
ure are bossing a pile-driving crew. 

Debbie has been doing just that — 
working with a crew of 10 to 15 burly, 
barrel-chested pile drivers on a va- 
riety of construction jobs in more than 
a half-dozen Eastern cities — almost 
from the day she left Rensselaer Poly- 
technic Institute in Troy, N.Y.. with 
a civil engineering degree, two years 
ago. 

Offered a position by several con- 
struction firms before graduation, 
Debbie chose Raymond International 
of Houston, Texas, because this was 
one of only two companies willing to 
assign her out-of-doors. 

Born and raised in Cranston, a 
small town in Rhode Island, Debbie 
retains the hint of a New England- 
Scottish accent. She says no one in 
her family ever worked in construc- 
tion. 

Debbie has been assigned by Ray- 
mond International to commercial, 
residential and industrial projects in 
Philadelphia and Allentown, Pa,; 
Dover, Del.; Baltimore and Ocean 
Ctiy, Md.; Boston, Miami and the 
nation's capital. 

Recently she was assigned to the 
track yards north of Washington's 
Union Station, where Metro's major 
repair shop will be located and where 
Metro trains will speed from an un- 
derground tunnel onto surface and 
aerial structures spanning the seven 
miles to Silver Spring, Maryland. 

Debbie , takes her job seriously 
enough to show up at least a half- 
hour before her men report at 7:30 
a.m. And it's not unusual to find her 
pouring over reports and order-forms 
in her compact trailer-office an hour 
or so after her crew has headed home 
at 4 p.m. 

Debbie's co-workers have nothing 
but the highest praise for her per- 
formance and ability, "Extremely 
competent , . , knows what has to be 
done and how to do it," 



FEBRUARY, 1973 



Continued from page 4 

in many manufacturing plants. They 
send lady delegates to our General 
Convention and are, typically, vocal 
and loyal trade unionists. 

There are women now working in 
drywall construction and in acousti- 
cal and insulation work also. 

The typical woman employed in 
the building trades is not a women's 
liberationist in the sensational sense 
of the term. The sex barriers have 
already been broken, in most cases. 
She is looking for a fair day's work 
at a fair day's pay, but she doesn't 
want to displace a man to get it or 
take a job just to prove a point. 

"Carpentry has always been a 
part of my life." Marilyn Beis told 
a Chicago Tribune reporter; 'T 
have always loved to work with my 
hands. At last I am being true to 
myself and doing what I want to do 
... I decided against pushing pa- 
pers around for the rest of my life." 

The male co-workers employed 
on the job where women work have 
become accustomed to having a 
woman around. 

"Sometimes delivery men stop 
and gawk at me, as if I belonged 
somewhere else," says Darlene Wis- 



dom. "But I don't pay them any 
mind. I really don't have time to 
stop and talk, my job keeps me 
pretty busy." 

Sometimes there's some salty 
language on a construction job, but 
the women who swing the hammers 
and measure the two-by-fours say 
that their presence seems to keep 
the off-color language in check. 

"I don't swear at them, and they 
don't swear at me," says one distaff 
worker. "If I tried, I think they'd 
laugh at me more than anything." 

Another woman worker com- 
ments: "Anytime they do say some- 
thing the least bit off color . . . and 
they seldom slip . . . they're always 
very apologetic . . . something I 
never expected." 

Whether or not the ladies stay 
in the hart-hat trades may depend 
somewhat on the hard hats them- 
selves. The chairman of the General 
Services Administration's board of 
contract appeals. Miss Evelyn Ep- 
pley, recently put on a hard hat and 
took a tour of the new US Labor 
Department construction site, across 
from Brotherhood Headquarters. 
She told the construction engineer 
on duty there, "Now I have an idea 
why there aren't going to be too 
many women on these jobs . . . The 
hats aren't too comfortable. ■ 



The Ladles in the Contractors' Office 




There are an estimated 166,000 
women working in the construction 
industry, and most of them are in 
the offices of the contractors, the 
subcontractors, the architects, etc. 
The.se are the "white collar" wom- 
en of the industry. 

Although some are represented 
for collective bargaining by the In- 
ternational Union of Office and 
Professional Employees, most are 
non-union. Close to 6.000 of them 



are members of the National Assn. 
of Women in Construction 
(NAWIC) — an organization found- 
ed in Fort Worth, Tex., in 1953. 
with 157 chapters spread across the 
nation. (The seal of NAWIC is 
shown at left.) Its national head- 
quarters is in Washington. D.C. 

N.-XWIC conducted a survey of 
its membership recently and found 
the average woman in construction 
to be married and in her middle 
40s. She works for a general con- 
tractor, primarily doing clerical 
work, and she has been in the in- 
dustry about six years. She earns 
from S6.000 to S8.000 a year. 

Members of NAWIC hold a 
wide variety of jobs ranging from 
estimator to office manager, from 
manufacturer's representative to 
treasurer, from trade publication 
reporter to executive secretar\ . 




Women in the 
Work Force Today 

Dr. Eleanor Brantley Schwartz, 
above, is associate professor of Busi- 
ness Administration at Cleveland State 
University in Ohio. She also conducts 
seminars on "Management Skills for 
Women" for an organization called 
.\dvance Management Research. Inc. 

The mother of two children, she 
earned her PhD degree at Georgia 
State University three years ago 
hoping to teach there. But. because, 
her husband. Dr. David Schwartz, is 
a marketing professor at the college, 
a nepotism regulation — barring hus- 
bands and wives from teaching in the 
same department — canceled out her 
desire to join the faculty of the pre- 
ceding school. So, with her husband's 
blessings, she left home and launched 
a teaching career at Cleveland State. 

On free weekends the Schwartzes 
commute by air between their two 
homes and. thus, share a novel and 
happy marriage. 

Dr. Schwartz sees the women's lib- 
oration pendulum swinging widely now 
hut expects it to settle at center. With 
ihe great increase in machine tools 
and automated devices, women can 
now take on many manual occupa- 
tions, including some phases of the 
construction trades, she points out. 
But she dosen't foresee American 
women losing their femininity to the 
degree that they will displace carpen- 
ters, bricklayers, and the like to any 
great extent. 

Women are less and less satisfied 
with the '"sexy but brainless" label, she 
says. Science, technology and modern 
living have broadened the working 
woman's horizons. She recognizes her 
traditional role, but if she must work 
outside the home, she wants to be in- 
volved in meaningful work, not low- 
pay dead-end jobs. 

The working woman's major hiudle 
today is overcoming the social mythol- 
ogy regarding what a woman should 
and should not do. Dr. Schwartz re- 
minds us that men were the first tele- 
phone operators, the first school teach- 
ers, and the first typists, until they 
discovered women could do such work 
as well. 

Continued on page 39 



THE CARPENTER 




ASHIN 





ROUNDUP 



COURT REJECTS SAFETY SUITS-The U.S. Supreme Court has refused to act on a challenge 
to the constitutionality of the Occupational Safety & Health Act, upholding lower 
court rulings that two small construction companies had not exhausted adminis- 
trative remedies under the act. 

Special three-court judges in Georgia and West Virginia dismissed the 
companies' suits challenging the law. The companies filed suit after the Lahor 
Dept. issued citations and notices of proposed fines after inspecting the concerns 
premises. 

Administrative procedures set up under the safety and health law must he 
exhausted, the judges ruled, before appeals can be made to the courts. 

MATERIALS STUDY GROUP— Labor ' s viewpoint on a number of subjects to be studied 
by the National Commission on Materials Policy will be represented on a five-man 
study committee. 

Agreement for creation of the committee was reached at a meeting between 
20 AFL-CIO representatives and representatives of the Commission, which is to 
make its report this year. 

Among the points outlined by labor representatives as having importance to 
them were: multinational corporations, depletion allowances, tax incentives, 
restrictions in imports and exports, and loss of jobs due to environmental 
regulations considered too stringent. 

Union representatives stressed the need for a manpower policy in the 
materials field that would ensure jobs now but which would also enable jobs to 
keep pace with technological developments in the future. 

RED CROSS SUPPORT— The AFL-CIO and affiliated organizations answered the national 
appeal of the American Red Cross in the wake of last summer's flooding disasters 
with contributions totaling $195,248, Community Services Director Leo Perils 
reported. 

These donations were in addition to special funds set up by a number of 
international unions to aid their own members and the thousands of man-hours of 
volunteer work by trade unionists in assisting flood victims and in community 
clean-up programs. 

NURSING HOME OMBUDSMEN— Senior Citizens are trying out a new way to make life 
better for nursing home patients. Using elderly volunteers, an experimental 
program started in Michigan seeks to show how nursing homes can be improved by 
giving nursing home patients a chance to make complaints known and get them 
resolved, William R. Hutton of Washington, B.C., executive director of the 
3,000,000-member lational Council of Senior Citizens, reports. 

The senior citizens organization operates what is called a lursing Home 
Ombudsman Program under a contract from the Health Services and Mental Health 
Administration (HSMHA) of the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare 
(HEW) . 

Up to now, virtually the only people consulted about the quality of nursing 
home care have been doctors, nurses, social workers and other health profes- 
sionals, Hutton points out. 

FAMILY WHO?-AFL-CI0 Social Security Director Bert Seidman in a speech disdained 
the medical profession's professed worry about the fate of the "family doctor" 
under a national health insurance program. 

"For most people, he doesn't exist," Seidman said. "Reality is the emergency 
room of the nearest hospital. They don't have a family doctor." 

CHEESE THAT BINDS-The Food and Drug Administration recently asked for public 
comment on allowing cheese manufacturers to use an anti-caking ingredient in 
grated cheese. The additive — called microcrystalline cellulose — can make up two 
percent of the weight of the finished product. 

The industry already uses silicon dioxide, calcium silicate and sodium 
silicoaluminate as anti-caking ingredients. But the National Cheese Institute 
says this additive is really needed. It will help consumers "shake the grated 
cheese from the dispenser." 



FEBRUARY, 1973 



LoCl AIi SECl JRj^^] 



Yes, you pay 






987-65-4320 iX 

THIS NUMBER HAS BfitN ESTABLISHED FOR 

re for 5oci#<S^curity 



SIGNATURE 




1973, but.. 



SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITS ARE GREATER, TOO 



■ Many wage earners of the 
United States did a "double take" 
when they looked at their first pay- 
checks of 1973. They had forgot- 
ten that there would be higher with- 
holding amounts for Social Security 
under 1972 changes in the Social 
Security Law. 

The 1973 deductions are, in fact, 
650 more for each $100 of wages 
than was withheld last year. 

It always hurts to have more 
money taken out of your paycheck, 
but, in this case, you'll eventually 
get more for your money in return. 
The 1972 changes in the law brought 
"new direction to Social Security," 
as the Martin E. Segal Company, 
pension consultant to the Brother- 
hood, points out. 

The insurance function of Social 
Security is extended, as Martin Segal 
indicates. For example, retirement 
benefits will rise if retirement is de- 
layed beyond age 65 (although the 
amount of increase in benefits has 
little relationship to the actuarial 
gain — the money actually saved by 
a delay in retirement). And the so- 
cial welfare function of Social Se- 
curity is broadened still further. For 
example, minimum benefits for 
workers with long records of em- 
ployment are increased sharply with- 
out regard to level of earnings and, 
thus, to contributions to the system. 

These changes in Social Security 
are particularly significant: 

• For the first time Social Secur- 
ity will provide medical benefits for 
a specific illness — kidney disease — 



rather than to a particular class of 
people designated by age or income. 

® For the first time. Medicare 
will be subsidized from general tax 
funds for all covered persons, rather 
than for low-income groups. 

• The general benefit structure, 
which formerly favored women, will 
be equalized. 

More than half of the increase 
is the result of putting the hospital 
insurance program under Medicare 
on a sound financial basis and ex- 
tending the protection of Medicare 
to disabled people under 65. Prior 
to the recent changes in the law the 
hospital insurance program was se- 



riously under-financed and Medi- 
care applied only to people 65 and 
over. 

Your Social Security contribu- 
tion rates for 1973 for retirement 
insurance, survivors insurance, dis- 
ability insurance, and hospital in- 
surance (under Medicare) total 
5.85%. As in the past, your em- 
ployer will match your contribution 
dollar for dollar. 

Also, if you earn more than 
$9,000, you'll pay contributions, and 
also get credit toward Social Secur- 
ity benefits, on more of your an- 
nual earnings this year than you did 
last year. Up to $10,800 can count 



The chart below shows how eiich dollar of your 1973 Social Security contribution will 
be used in 1973. Retirement benefits still account for 52'^f of the total contributions. 



Administrative Expenses 2(? 



Hospital Benefits 
Under Medicare ' 



Reser\es fio 



Disabihty 
Benefits 9(( 




Survivors 
Benefits \9i 



Retirement 

Benefits SZc 



' Tlie other part of Medicare, doclor-bill insur- 
ance, is financed by the monthly premiums paid 
by people who enroll in the program and by the 
Federal Government from general revenues. 



8 



THE CARPENTER 



toward Social Security in 1973, 
compared with $9,000 last year. 

The new legislation makes signif- 
icant and far-reaching improvements 
in your Social Security protection — 
improvements that will benefit not 
only those now getting Social Secur- 
ity checks but also, of course, those 
now contributing to the program. 

Among the major improvements 
now part of Social Security are: 

• The amount of Social Security 
benefits payable now and in the fu- 
ture was increased by 20 percent 
last year. Together with earlier in- 
creases, this means that Social Se- 
curity benefits have increased over 
70 percent in the last 5 years. 

• Social Security is now inflation 
proof. Benefits will increase auto- 
matically in future years to keep 
them up to date with increases in 
the cost of living. Also, the amount 
of yearly earnings that Social Secur- 
ity can cover will increase auto- 
matically to keep pace with the in- 
creases in average wage levels. 

• Under the new "retirement 
test," people who work while they 
get Social Security checks will al- 
ways be assured that the more they 
earn, the more total income they 
will have. 

• From now on many older 
widows (and dependent widowers) 
will get a higher benefit rate than 
in the past. A widow who starts 
getting Social Security at 65 will 
get the same amount her husband 
would have gotten, instead of SlVi 
percent, as in the past. 

• Men who reach 62 in the fu- 
ture will have their benefits figured 
in the same way as they are for 
women, meaning higher checks for 
male workers and their dependents. 

• Workers who start getting So- 
cial Security in years after they're 
65 will get delayed retirement 
credits, giving them higher benefits 
than they would have gotten other- 
wise. 

• Workers eligible for Social 
Security disability benefits will start 
receiving their checks for the sixth 
month of disability rather than for 
the seventh month, as before. 

Men, Women Equalized 

You hear a great deal nowadays 
about women lacking equality with 
men, but it's been the other way 



around in figuring retirement bene- 
fits under Social Security. 

"For example," the Social Secur- 
ity Administration points out, "a 
woman of 65 who has always earned 
the maximum amount that could be 
credited for Social Security would 
get about $269 a month if she re- 
tires now. But a man — who is the 
same age and has exactly the same 
earnings — would only get $259." 

The new Social Security Law wUl 
eliminate that difference over the 
next three years. 

At present, benefit amounts for 
both men and women are based on 
average earnings, but average earn- 
ings are figured up to age 62 for 
women and up to age 65 for men. 

Both men and women can strike 
out some years of low earnings, but 
because of the dilTerent ages used 
it works out that men must use 
three more years of earnings than 
women do in figuring the average 
yearly earnings on which the month- 
ly benefit rate is based. 

Under the new law, men who 
reach 62 in 1973 will be able to 
drop an additional year of low earn- 
ings; men reaching 62 in 1974 will 
drop an additioanl two years; and 
men reaching 62 in 1975 will drop 
an additional three years. 

Also, reduced benefits will now 
be provided for nondisabled widow- 
ers at age 60, as is now the case 
for widows. 

Medicare for disabled 

Under the new law. Medicare 
protection will be extended for the 




Charlie Smith of 
Bartow, Florida, at 
130 is the oldest 
person getting 
monthly Social Se- 
curity payments. 
Mr. Smith, who 
was bom in Li- 
beria, was sold in- 
to slavery at 12 — 
118 years ago. At 
115, while Mr. 
Smith was picking 
oranges, a Social 
Security worker 
stopped to talk to 
him. Social Security made a check that 
turned up documents in New Orleans and 
Texas that gave the details of his sale into 
slavery and confirmed his age, and Mr. 
Smith started getting monthly Social Se- 
curity retirement checks. He now oper- 
ates "Charlie Smith's Soft Drink and 
Candy Store" in Bartow. 



first time to some people under 65. 
Starting July 1, 1973, people who 
have gotten Social Security disabil- 
ity benefits for more than 2 years 
will be eligible for hospital and 
medical insurance under Medicare. 
Such beneficiaries include disabled 
workers of any age, disabled wid- 
ows, and dependent widowers be- 
tween 50 and 65, and adults dis- 
abled before age 22. 

In addition, Medicare protection 
is extended to people who need he- 
modialysis or kidney transplants 
for chronic kidney disease. This 
protection is for workers insured 
under Social Security, for their wives 
or husbands and children, as well as 
for people eligible for Social Secur- 
ity checks. 



Support Proof Eliminated For Divorced Women 



As of January 1, a divorced 
woman no longer has to prove she 
gets support from her ex-husband 
to get monthly Social Security 
payments based on his work rec- 
ord, according to Social Security 
officials. 

"The support requirement is 
eliminated by the new Social Se- 
curtiy Law," a spokesman said. 

Previously, a divorced woman 
who met the other requirements 
for entitlement had to prove her 
ex-husband was providing at least 
half of her support — or that he 
was giving her substantial con- 
tributions under a written agree- 
ment or was under court order 
to do so. 

Some state laws make it difficult 



for a divorced woman to obtain 
support from her ex-husband, ac- 
cording to the spokesman. "Many 
divorced women in financial need 
have been unable to get Social 
Security payments for that rea- 
son." he said. 

Monthly benefits based on ex- 
husbands' work records are pay- 
able to divorced wives, beginning 
at 62: to divorced widows, begin- 
ning at 60; and to divorced moth- 
ers at any age if they have de- 
pendent children of that marriage 
in their care under this condition: 

The ex-husbands must either be 
getting Social Security retirement 
or disability payments, or they 
must have died after working long 
enough under Social Security. 



FEBRUARY, 1 973 




CANADIAN 



Rapid Rise in Public Service Unionism 
Accounts for Major Stoppages of '72 



The public's concern with work 
stoppages through strikes and lockouts 
has become more and more vocal but 
not always more reasonable. 

Strikes and lockouts in Canada in 
1972 probably set an all-time record. 
Some of the figures are already in. 
But when they are examined, it is 
evident that there were fewer strikes 
and lockouts, even though there was 
more time lost. 

If a strike record is set in terms of 
working time lost (the full 1972 fig- 
ures may be in by the time this is in 
print) it will not have been set by the 
old established union organizations 
such as those in construction and in 
manufacturing. 

They will have been set by the pub- 
lic service. This is a new phenomenon. 

Until recent years the public service 
in almost every Canadian jurisdiction 
was forbidden to strike. This is still 
true in the Province of Ontario, except 
in the publicly-owned Ontario Hydro- 
Electric System. 

It is not true in the federal govern- 
ment, where public employees can 
make a choice in their contractual ar- 
rangements between settlement by ar- 
bitration, if negotiations break down, 
or strike action. 

In those areas where public employ- 
ees have joined unions and have opted 
for the right to strike, they have not 
been backward in taking advantage of 
it. Long years of below-par wages and 
salaries as a result of the lack of or 
restricted right to collective bargaining 
have provided time for grievances to 
build up. The resentment is now com- 
ing out in vigorous, sometimes pro- 
longed, strike action. 

This was true last year in the Prov- 
ince of Quebec, where about 200,000 
public employees, including those in 
schools and hospitals were involved in 
a major strike, which was only halted 
by government decree. In some areas 



negotiations for settlements are still 
continuing well into 1973. 

A clear example is Ontario. In the 
first 1 1 months of 1972. over two mil- 
lion man-days were lost through 
strikes. 

This was a 60% increase over the 
previous year. But the remarkable 
fact is that 43% of the total time lost 
in the 1 1 -month period was due to just 
one strike out of 189. This work stop- 
page involved about 12.000 employees 
at the Ontario Hydro-Electric Power 
Commission, who lost almost 900.000 
man-days of work out of the total of 
two million. 

In comparison, the construction in- 
dustry in Ontario lost only 171,837 
man-days of work due to stoppages, 
31,000 less than in 1971. 

So public service unions, which are 
growing at a rapid rate, are becoming 
a big factor in labor-management re- 
lations. They are the ones which have 
revived the old cry among public 
spokesmen about the "public interest" 
in strike situations. 

Of course the strike ratio in work 
stoppages this year could be different 
from last. The public service unions 
will again be involved in major nego- 
tiations. But so will the construction 
unions, railway unions, auto, clothing 
and pulp and paper. 

This will be a big bargaining year. 

Ontario Stoppages 
0.3% in 72 



Only 



The Ontario labor department has 
provided an important footnote to col- 
lective bargaining records in that prov- 
ince. Last year time lost through work 
stoppages was only 0.3% of total man- 
days worked by the work force and 
93% of all agreements were reached 
by normal negotiations — without work 
stoppages. 



Security, Retirement 
To Be Future Factors 

Job security and early retirement 
will become more important factors 
in labor-management negotiations, ac- 
cording to Dr. John Crispo, who is 
head of the Faculty of Management 
Studies at the University of Toronto. 

This does not mean that the demand 
for higher wages will be weakened, he 
said, because the pattern of wage in- 
creases and the rising cost of living 
has already been established. 

He also expects the work week to 
be a more contentious issue. Compa- 
nies are experimenting with a three or 
four-day, 40-hour week. Unions in 
principle are opposed to it as an at- 
tempt to freeze the 40-hour week 
against union demands for shorter 
hours in the work week. 

Work Safety Net 
Mulled By Unions 

Unions, including the building 
trades, have given strong support to a 
graphic designer who has invented a 
safety net for use by construction com- 
panies involved in high buildings. 

The companies' response here has 
been negative, but the inventor, Juan 
Garcia, says that at least two large 
U.S. companies are interested and one 
has offered to buy the invention. 

The invention involves a series of 
nets which protrude from every other 
floor on a high building. Made of 
synthetic rope, the net would be sup- 
ported by glass fibre rods. 

Workers or materials falling into the 
nets would roll onto the floor from 
which the safety device was hung. 

Fluid Situation 
At Federal Level 

It is not easy to report on doings at 
the federal level of government when 
the situation is so fluid. Only two 
seats separate the Liberal government 
and the Conservative opposition, and 
the latter are determined to do all they 
can to overturn the Trudeau Admin- 
istration. 

If this happened, it would mean that 
Robert Stanfield would head a Tory 
government and face the same dilem- 
ma or we would be into another fed- 
eral election. And who would bet that 
the result of another election would 
be different? 

But at this writing the Trudeau gov- 
ernment has given some evidence that 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



they are going to tackle some of the 
key problems that they neglected pre- 
viously. 

At the opening of parliament in Jan- 
uary, the government declared that it 
has two goals, national unity and 
equality of opportunity; and two main 
policies, economic to reduce unem- 
ployment, and social to relationalize 
Canada's complicated social security 
system. 

The government also made a bid 
for support of the New Democratic 
Party which holds the balance of pow- 
er, and of the western provinces where 
the Liberals lost almost every seat in 
the last October election. 

At first reading, the program out- 
lined sounded good and certainly was 
good politics. 

The government won itself a short- 
term lease on power, renewable on 
good behavior. 

Government Studies 
Housing Warranties 

In the field of housing, the govern- 
ment is planning improvement in its 
housing policies, including a study of 
urban transport, more aid in the pur- 
chase of homes, and a warranty sys- 
tem to protect purchasers. 

The warranty system is long over- 
due. The government operates a sys- 
tem of mortgage guarantees for banks, 
trust companies and other moneylend- 
ers but the home-buyer is at the mercy 
of the developer unless he can afford 
a lawyer. 

In a housing development in the 
nickel city of Sudbury, families who 
thought they had bought homes found 
that they were only renting them. 
Their money for down payments dis- 
appeared, and the affairs of the com- 
panies are in such disorder that it is 
hard to find out exactly what hap- 
pened. 

But the bank which owns the mort- 
gages is covered by the federal insur- 
ance system. 

Changing Controls 
In Two Major Cities 

The public is up in arms about what 
is happening to the cities. Developers 
and their lawyers seem to have control 
over city council decisions and over 
types of development. 

There are clear signs that the public 
is reacting against this perversion of 
the democratic process. 

In two of Canada's major cities. 
Toronto and Vancouver, old-estab- 



lishment city councils have been sub- 
stantially changed. In both cities new 
mayors have been elected pledged to 
pay more attention to what people 
want rather than what the developers 
want. 

In Toronto the balance of power 
has changed from the "old guard" to 
the "reformers" made up of citizens 
from all political parties. The one 
trade unionist on the council, veteran 
operating engineer Archie Chisholm, 
is definitely on the side of the reform- 
ers. 

Toronto is such a fast-growing city 
that it is hard to maintain orderly 
progress. It is easy to get submerged 
in huge office towers and apartments 
and by traffic. 

Vancouver, hemmed in by mountain 
on one side and by ocean on the other, 
has its own particular problems. But 
the citizenry don't like huge develop- 
ments shutting out both. 

Maybe more thought, if slower ac- 
tion, will be order. But the pres- 
sures of population growth continue. 

Putting Doctors 
On Salary Studied 

More thought has to be given to the 
subject of medical fees involving how 
doctors are paid. More support is 
building up for putting doctors on 
salary. 

One reason this has come about is 
the fact that health care costs are go- 
ing up fast and doctors are part of the 
problem. 

A study of medicare costs is going 
on in Canada and one in Ontario. A 
Toronto professor charged that Onta- 
rio's public health system has become 
a "guaranteed income system for doc- 
tors" and "a feeding trough for a ra- 
pacious profession." 

His position was supported by an 
official from the U.S. Department of 
Health. Education and Welfare, who 
said that some doctors are abusing 
Medicare for elderly people and that 
the inflation rate in health care was 
double that of the rest of the economy. 

He said that more federal controls 
over doctors are coming. This may 
occur in Canada too, but perhaps on a 
provincial basis. 



The Canadian Price Index, com- 
piled by the Dominion Bureau of 
Statistics, continues to rise, as does 
the US price index. It was set at 142.3 
last November — 6.9 over November, 
1971. 



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11 



National Health 
Insttrance Needed 
Now 'More 
Than Ever' Says 
Labor Spokesman 

The AFL-CIO intends to "do 
everything in its power to see that 
America lias a National Health 
Security Act as soon as humanly 
possible," a Federation leader em- 
phasizes. 

AFL-CIO Social Securitj Direc- 
tor Bert Seidnian told a Maritime 
Trades Department luncheon in 
Washington, D.C., that "such a 
goal is now more important than 
ever" because the U.S. continues to 
fall further behind other countries 
in terms of health care. 

"Despite America's advance 
technological development," he 
pointed out. "she now ranks 13th 
in infant mortalitj-, seventh in 
maternal death rates, 17th in male 
life expectancy and 10th in female 
life expectancy." 

While America "slips further and 
further behind" in health care, 
Seidman pointed out, its cost con- 
tinues to leap upward. "It has gone 
up an incredible 600 percent since 
1 950, faster than any other item on 
the Labor Department's Consumer 
Price Index," he added. 

Seidman attacked private insur- 
ance plans as a "miserable failure" 
in that they pay only about one- 
fourth of total medical bills; are 
loaded with exclusions; fail to cov- 
er adequately "high risk" people, 
such as the aged; contain no con- 
trols on providers of medicine, and 
have "inordinately" high adminis- 
trative costs. 

Labor is solidly opposed to the 
so-called "national health Insur- 
ance" schemes advanced by Presi- 
dent Nixon and the American 
Medical Association, Seidman said, 
because they would turn medical 
care over "to these same private 
companies who have mismanaged it 
for so many years." 

These proposals, he noted, also 
"have no effective cost controls or 
quality incentives, fail to provide 
universal coverage or comprehen- 
sive services and set up different 
levels of benefits for different 
groups of people." 

The only answer, therefore, 
Seidman declared, is to use proven 

Continued on page 32 




The Continuing Struggle 
For Health Security 



BY E. G. MARSHALL 



■ An intense struggle is now taking 
place in this country. All of the 
protagonists use substantially the 
same rhetoric and stand for the same 
things. 

But, sadly, most people in this 
country are not even aware of the 
struggle that is being waged for 
their right to live in America as 
healthy individuals. 

The struggle is, of course, over 
what form a program of national 
health insurance will take in the 
United States. 

There are several different pro- 
posals now in Congress. Briefly, here 
they are: 

The National Health Security 
Bill, reintroduced by Senator Ed- 
ward Kennedy (D-Mass.) and Rep- 
resentative Martha Griffiths CD- 
Mich.) on January 4, is the most 
comprehensive of all the proposals. 
More coverage would be included 
than in any of the other bills, yet 
would be no more expensive in the 
long run. It would be financed by 
employer-employee payments along 
with 2eneral tax revenues. No in- 



dividual would pay more than $150 
a year, but would have his whole 
family adequately covered. 

Medicredit is the name attached 
to the proposal of the American 
Medical Association. It is a bill that 
sounds good to the unpracticed ear, 
but is also one that, upon close ex- 
amination, is fully intended to pre- 
serve the highly inadequate status 
quo of the present health care and 
insurance system. It is a voluntary 
plan in which the individual must 
purchase his own insurance and then 
receives a tax credit for the pur- 
chase. This firmly straps those who 
cannot now afford adequate insur- 



The author is the 
star of two well- 
known television 
programs, "The De- 
fenders" and "The 
Bold Ones." He is 
an active member of 
the Screen Actors 
Guild, AFL-CIO. 
His summary, here, 
of the health security issue now before Con- 
gress is excerpted from a recent article in 
Screen Aclor, official publication of SAG. 




12 



THE CARPENTER 



ance coverage into permanent inade- 
quacy. 

The Nixon proposal expands the 
role of private insurance companies 
and allows only limited benefits, 
which are tightly intertwined with 
cutoffs and deductibles. 

Of the three major proposals, 
only the National Health Security 
bill fully endorses the concept of 
adequate health care as a human 
right. 

The others, after a thorough ex- 
amination, can be seen only as en- 
dorsing the concept of increased 
profits for insurance companies. 

There is no doubt that the country 
will have some sort of national 
health plan in the near future. 

Our task is to make sure that it 
will be the right one for the people 
of this country. In other words, we 
are going to buy some policy, but 
we should make sure that it is an 
improvement over the present frag- 
mented system of health care. 

America must choose between 
proposals from the AMA, certainly 
no vanguard of the people's well- 
being; the Nixon proposal, one that 
insures profits for proven insurance 
company incompetency; and the 
National Health Security bill, back- 
ed by Sen. Kennedy, Rep. Griffiths, 
the AFL-CIO, the Health Security 
Action Council and other groups. 

Besides these three main propos- 
als, from time to time others appear 
which serve mainly to take advan- 
tage of the current political climate. 

Representative of this group are 
proponents of a plan that is called 
catastrophic insurance. 

Now catastrophic insurance is a 
great sounding title for any insur- 
ance plan. It gives one the feeling 
that he doesn't have to worry be- 
cause if a serious illness does strike 
his family or him, it is all taken 
care of. 

No one could ask for anything 
more, you think. But does cata- 
strophic insurance really take care 
of a catastrophy as its name im- 
plies? The answer to that is a re- 
sounding no. 

Generally speaking, catastrophic 
plans would pay 80 percent of the 
"reasonable charges" over $2000 
for a single accident or illness. 

Continued on page 14 




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.Age. 



Address _ 



City. 



. State . 



. Zip . 



Occupation _ 



FEBRUARY, 1973 



13 




HEALTH SECURITY 

Continued from page 13 

That also sounds good. But let's 
take another look at this plan. First 
of all, it assumes the ability to pay 
the first $2000. This, of course, is 
sheer idiocy. No one but the people 
who are rich — those who can afford 
the best medical care now — can ac- 
cept a S2000 bill before there is any 
idea of "catastrophe." 

Catastrophic insurance discrimi- 
nates against the poor and just as 
important — against the middle in- 
come group, while protecting the 
rich. 

The whole idea of any certain 
cutoff is discriminatory. Who is to 
say that a bill for S2000 is a catas- 
trophe and a bill for S1900 is not? 

Neither are there any plans for 
cost controls in the catastrophic con- 
cept. Catastrophic insurance would 
deemphasize preventive care and de- 
lay much needed reforms in the 
health care field. 

Medical fees are the fastest grow- 
ing factor in the family budget to- 
day. With no incenti\e to control 
costs, what is to prevent the Medi- 
care e.xperience from repeating it- 
self? 

When Medicare was passed back 
in the 1960's, the cost of medical 
care shot up. Doctors began charg- 
ing for services they had never be- 
fore charged for. 

Under such a program, even if 
S2000 was a fair figure, it would 
progressively mean less and less. 

The acceptability of the Nixon 
Administration and AMA proposals 
are based on that very premise: 
These legislative proposals may 
sound good to the public because 
nobody really is listening carefully 
enough. 

This has been one of the main 
stumbling blocks in the campaign 
to pass the National Health Security 
bill. 

The AMA and the insurance in- 
dustry have begun a campaign in 
the newspapers and television com- 
prised solely of catchy phrases that 
mean absolutely nothing in real 
terms. 

Those of us who favor the Na- 
tional Health Security bill, face a 
difficult task. 



We cannot hope to match the 
money being spent by special in- 
terest groups to defeat National 
Health Security. 

We cannot hope to match the 
so-called "education campaign"' be- 
ing waged by the special interests. 

But we have faced these seem- 
ingly insurmountable odds before. 
The same sort of well financed cam- 
paign was waged by the special in- 
terests against Medicare. 

But we beat those odds. We beat 
them because people turned away 
from their tele\'ision and the full- 
page newspaper advertisements and 
looked to the community around 
them. They saw senior citizens, ex- 
isting on a poverty level, who could 
not hope to afford decent medical 
care; they saw poor people who 
were getting poorer every day. who 
could not hope to afford decent 
medical care; and if they will only 
look around today, they will see 
families who are solidly middle class 
being wiped out by tremendous 
medical bills. 

We cannot afford not to think 
about health. We cannot afford to 
wait till we get sick before we real- 
ize that our 'great' health care sys- 
tem isn't really great. 

We have to buy an insurance 
policy. It isn't a question of what 
this country can afford to pay. 
America is already leagues ahead 
of every other country in health 
care expenditures, but the facts also 
show that America is leagues behind 
on the return it gets for its invest- 
ment. 

The question boils down to this 
— we are going to buy a policy; 
should we buy one based on tele- 
\ision commercials, the way we 
would buy from a door-to-door 
salesman, or can we convince the 
American public to look at the al- 
ternatives and make the best choice. 

Those of us who are working 
towards National Health Security 
have only one special interest — the 
health of this countrj' — and we are 
sure that any rational look at the 
issues confronting America's health 
care system cannot possibly deny 
that the only plan that promises bet- 
ter health care is one that is very 
simply, and aptly, called National 
Health Securitv." 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



the key 




to your future! 






ORVILLE PIERCE 

(LaPuente, Calif.) 
"While in training I 
earned $200 and I now 
have a mobile unit 
which I operate in my 
spare time . . . en- 
joyed the course and 
think it was the best 
instruction one can get 
in this field." 



HORACE H. ALBRtGHT 
(Brookhaven, Miss.) 
"... average about 
$4.00 per hour. I think 
the whole course was 
the greatest, the best 
instructor and when I 
retire ... am going to 
do locksmith work full 
time. Thank you." 



W. M. RAGSDALE 
(Conyers. Ga) "I think 
the Locksmithing Insti- 
tute is doing a fine job 
training people for the 
locksmithing trade. I 
now do all the lock re- 
pair for the County Hrgh 
School, with a pleasing 
increase in salary." 



LOCKSMITH 




^ Newspaper headlines tell the story. 

Pick up a paper any day. Burglary, house- 
breaking, vandalized homes — no wonder 
America is locked up tighter than ever be- 
fore. And there are more nomes, more stores 
and factories, more hotels, more cars, and 
more people. And that means more keys 
and locks. 

-^ The fast way to success . . . independence. 

From the start you get practical experience 
doing real jobs on car locks, home locks, 
padlocks, and safes. Within six months you 
can be on the road to complete indepen- 
dence of bosses, low wages, layoffs, small 
retirement income. 

Don't you owe it to yourself to get the facts 
today? The card below won't even cost you 
postage. No salesman will call. You and you 
alone can make your decision based on the 
straightforward facts you will receive. 






Earn as much as $10 an hour — or more. 

'^S7 Today a trained locksmith can just about 
write his own ticket. Earn as much as he 
wants to work. Earn in his spare time, in a 
business of his own, or in a highly- pa id 
position with someone else. Earn in almost 
any part of the country he wishes to live, 

■^ Learn at home — earn as you learn. 

Let Locksmithing Institute show you abso- 
lutely free how you can qualify for this ex- 
citing, action field. The information card 
below will bring you full details about the 
fast, easy course that trains you by "doing" 
for this highly-paid profession. See how you 
can learn at home, rn your spare time, even 
while you hold down your present job. See 
how the key-making machine and complete 
set of tools included with the course can 
put you in business earning money right 
while you are learning. 




LOCKSMITHING SNSTITUTE 

Division of Technical Home Study Schools 
Dept. 1118-023 Little Falls, New Jersey 07424 

Locksmithing Institute is Licensed by State ol New Jersey. Accredited Member 
National Home Study Council. Slate Approved Diploma, Approved tor Veterans Training 



YOUR OWN 
BURGLAR 
FIRE ALARM 
INSTALLATION 
BUSINESS 

LEARN ALARM/SECURITY INSTALLATION, 
SERVICING & SALES AT HOME QUICKLY! 

A recent FBI crime report showed that a 
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aeconda in the United States. Right now, 
one of the most rapidly-expanding indus- 
tries in the U.S.A. is the home and busineaa 
security field. As crime increases, demand 
for home and business protection expands 
with it. The need has never been greater. 

Yc-t. aurprisingly. you need no particular 
mechanical abilities or even electrical knowl- 
edge. Alarm systems operate on very low 
voltages which are not dangerous and do not 
require an electrician's license. 

Profitability is highl An average $450 job 
can cost just $80 for parts and take just 16 
hours of labor (your own or that of a helper 
whom you pay about $5 per hour). Similar 
businesses are bringing their owners gross 
incomes of $15,000 to $30,000 in many com- 
munities. 

Train in your own home, at the hours 
you choose. Lessons — clearly written for 
study at home— cover all typeB of installa- 
tions, alarms, electric eye, protecting win- 
dows with foil, hidden switches, all the 
"trade secrets" of the industry. All include 
clear, easy-to-understand illustrations. You 
have available, as needed, personal help 
from a skilled instructor. You will learn by 
doing, and will receive a kit of professional 
tools, supplies and materials, with which 
you can put theory into practice. You will 
be trained in estimating for profit, and in 
how to get business. 

For full information on all the opportuni- 
ties in this expanding field, mail coupon 
today. No salesman will call, ever. 

SECURITY SYSTEMS 
MANAGEMENT SCHOOL 

Division of Technical Home Study Schools 
Dept. 7118-023 Little Falls, N. J. 07424 



postage 
paid 

foldover 
card for 

FREE 

information 
on either 
course 

no salesman, 
will call i 



<B rn 

<D —I 

*< c 

o o 

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ro 



o 

O 
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HURRY! MAIL THIS POSTAGE-FREE CARD! 

•^ CUT OUT. Ready to Mail Coupon Below, ir ~" "~ ~~ — ~~ ""^ """ 

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-u 
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n Veterans and Servicemen: check here for 
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Construction, North Americans Largest Industry, 
Gets Degree Recognition at Eastern College 




Muscarelle 



Jos. L. Muscarelle, Sr., founder 
and board chairman of Jos. L. Mus- 
carelle, Inc., prominent building 
construction firm 
with headquar- 
ters in Maywood. 
N.J., recently an- 
nounced a grant 
of $1,000,000 to 
Fairleigh Dick- 
inson University 
to construct and 
equip a Center 
of Building Con- 
struction Studies 
at the university's Teaneck-Hack- 
ensack campus. Mr. Muscarelle 
made the announcement at a news 
conference convened at the new 
Student Commons Building at the 
campus. 

Participating in the event with 
Mr. Muscarelle were Fairleigh S. 
Dickinson, Jr., chairman of the uni- 
versity's board of trustees; Dr. J. 
Osborn Fuller, university president; 
Dr. Jerome H. Pollack, executive 
and academic vice president; Dr. 
George Courville. acting dean of 
the College of Science and Engi- 
neering; and Paul Brienza, manag- 
ing director. Building Contractors 
Association of New Jersey. 

Mr. Muscarelle's grant, which he 
presented in the name of his family, 
means that the university will be- 
come the first institution of higher 
learning with a center devoted ex- 
clusively to the study of building 
construction — the nation's largest 
industry. 

FDU's Center for Building Con- 
struction will be housed in a struc- 
ture of approximately 1 6,000 square 
feet. Mr. Muscarelle, in conjunction 
with the university and the New 
Jersey Chapter of the American In- 
stitute of Architects, will sponsor a 
design competition leading to the 
selection of the architectural firm to 
prepare drawings for the building. 
Upon completion of the final plans 



New Center for Building Construction 
At Fairleigh Dickenson University 
Is Gift of Construction Contractor 



and specifications, the Muscarelle 
firm, staffed by almost 800 engineer- 
ing specialists and construction 
workers, will supervise and construct 
the Center at cost. Muscarelle will 
also supply services of on-staff ex- 
cavation, concrete and masonry 
teams to perform their specialties. 

It is estimated that the cost of 
furnishings and equipment will be 
.$79,500; $93,000 per year is the 
projected budget for a full time fac- 
ulty and supportive staff. Contribu- 
tions from various segments of the 
construction industry in the form of 
scholarships, and donated equip- 
ment and supplies will hopefully aug- 
ment the estimated $78,000 per year 
the program will produce in tuition 
fees. 

Upon completion early in 1974 
the Center is expected to provide a 
focal point in New Jersey for inter- 
action between the construction in- 
dustry and the academic commu- 
nity. First task of the Center, and 
its principal continuing one through- 
out the years, will be the under- 
graduate training of university level 
personnel to fill the increasingly 
complex needs of the construction 
industry. Later, as the Center's 
scope expands, it is anticipated its 
activities will also broaden to in- 
clude seminars, conferences, con- 
tinuing education and re-training 
programs, graduate level training, 
development programs and product 
testing facilities. Specifically, the 
academic degree to be offered by 
the four-year program will be Bach- 
elor of Science in Engineering Tech- 
nology-Construction Option. 

In making known the $1,000,000 
srant, Mr. Muscarelle described the 



program that will be made possible 
as a blending of the academic and 
the technical. "The Center for 
Building Construction Studies, as I 
envision it, wiU offer a four-year 
course leading to a Bachelor of 
Science degree in Engineering Tech- 
Qology-Construction Option. In ad- 
dition to highly technical and pro- 
fessional subjects, the student will 
also be given instruction in eco- 
nomics, history, accounting, law, 
personnel management and other 
humanities subjects." Mr. Musca- 
relle said, adding that on-the-job 
training will be available to students 
taking this course "at various con- 
struction sites during vacations, per- 
haps even as a part of the curricu- 
lum." 

Mr. Muscarelle. during his brief 
remarks announcing the million dol- 
lar grant, noted his co-existing 
emotions of humility and pride 
which he felt on the occasion. "I am 
humble because what I am about 
to do reminds me of my own humble 
origin ... I am proud because I 
have been able to take advantage 
of the opportunities open to me — 
and, in truth, to everyone in this 
great country of ours." 

In closing, he held out three goals 
he hoped his monetary grant would 
help accomplish: to initiate both 
labor and industry support for the 
program "to make this Center sec- 
ond to none in the study of build- 
ing construction; to serve as an in- 
centive and inspiration for further 
private support; and to become "a 
symbol of Italo-American heritage 
and our contribution to the Ameri- 
can way of life." 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



A gallery of pictures showing some of the senior members of the 
Brotherhood who recently received 25-year or 50-year service pins. 




MONTCLAIR, N. J. 

Service pins were presented to a 
Uirge rosier of Local 429 members 
recently. The accompanying group 
picture sliows many of those honored. 
Tlic list of honorees includes: 

25 YEAR PINS— Eric Aim. Mehin 
Anderson. Sam Anello, Anthonv 
Autorino, D. F. Bartholomew. Bernt 
Berntson, Frank Bogart, Ralph E. 
Brown, Eldred Bullard, Joseph 
Camarata, John E. Carlson, Nicolas 
Caruso, Vincent Ciccone. John 
Crowley, Frank De Maio, Richard 
Dorer, Daniel Edwards. William 
Ferrell, Theodore Ftorczak, Ambrose 
Fox, Thomas Gara, Peter Grifhn. 
John Giistaf.wn. James Horvath. J. J. 
Jarmakowicz, Eric Johnson, Harry 
K. Johnson, Roy Johnson, Alexander 
Kennedy, Eriing Kleiven, Charles 
Langan, Charles Laracy, John F. Lee, 
Eugene Lepclletier, Joseph Locascio, 
James Malcolm, George Macrander, 
Eugene McLaughlin, Charles 
Mongiovi, Frank Moormann, James 
Moormann, George W. Nelson. 
H. J. R. Neiwn, Edward Oleksiak. 
Raynunul Paxton, John V . Peter.son. 
John Petronaci, George Pettiit, 
Rudolph Pfeiffer, Maurice Rawcliffe, 
James Reilly, Donald Rollin, William 
Rucinski, Felice Ruggiero, Tony 
Sardo, Thomas Schmanske, William 
Skrips, E. M. Smeaton, Josef 
Staniaszek, Donald Swanson. J, E. 



Szydlowski, John Szymanski, Carl 
Wallman, John Ward, William 
Westlake, Ivar Wick, William Wood, 
and Arne Ziem. 

30 YEAR PINS—Erick Aim, 
Erick Anderson, Nels Anderson, 
Waller Barbcrie. Fritz Berntson, 
Roger Blair, John Brzozowski . 
Norman Burns. Rocco Cardell, Fred 
Cropper. Lcif Dahl, trvin Day, 
Dominick Donudio, Paul Green, 
Ernest Haversang, Herbert Jacobson, 
Karl E. Johnson. Martin D. Johnson, 
Erik Larsen, Philip Leone, Carl 
Lindow, Donald McNamara. Jr., 
Donald McNamara. Sr., Charles 
Moslier, Robert Mostrom. James 
Newport. Irving Pierson. John 
Schilling, John Specian, William 
S lime berg, Axel Swenson, and Jidm 
Traeger. 

35 YEAR PINS— John V. Ander- 
son, Wilhelm Anderson. Carl 
Arvidson. John Backlund. Herbert 
Bergwatl, Alfred Carlson, Arther 
Emmerson, Anthony Goglio. Bror 
Huge, Edward Hintz. George Hintz, 
Weldmar Jansen, Levin Joiison, Eric 
Lindstrom, Thomas McNah, Frank 
Mellln, John Oherg, Adolph Pearson, 
Ellis Peterson, Gunnar Peterson, 
Per Tage Peterson, Raymond 
Pierson, Henry Schafer, Thomas 
Skoie, and Eilerl Tonnerson. 

40 YEAR PINS— Lotus Locascio— 
deceased. 



45 YEAR PINS— Allen Ashley, 
William Douglas. David Lund. John 
L. Nelson. Erick Paerson, Oscar 
Peterson, Harry Priichard, Bror Rix, 
John Swenson, and Samuel Vieceli. 

50 YEAR PINS—Ole Anderson, 
Johan H. Johnson, Anton Nelson, 
Edward Peterson, Raynor Swenson, 
and George Wagner. 



DOWNERS GROVE, ILL. 

A special 
meeting was 
called, last year, 
by Local 1889 
to honor Roy E. 
Vix, a member 
of Local 1889 
since February 
26. 1926. and 
an officer since 
June 25, 1935, 
when he was 
elected trustee. 
Vix was elected financial secretary 
on June 12. 1940. and business repre- 
sentative on June 10. 1964. He re- 
signed as business representative on 
January 3, 1972, and when his resig- 
nation as financial secretary became 
effective on April 12, 1972. lie had 
more than 46 years of service in the 
Brotherhood. 




FEBRUARY, 1 973 



17 



MIAMI, FLA. 

Local 993, Miami, honored its 
senior members at a special called 
meeting recently. A total of 166 
members were presented membersliip 
pins by International Representative 
Jack Sheppard. About 250 members 
attended this meeting, after which 
a buffet supper was served. 

The accompanying pictures are 
of members wlio received their pi'ns. 



In the first picture, front row, 
George Knudsen, 25 years; Kelly 
Kinnaird. 25; M. E. Patterson, 25; 
Kenneth Andrus. 25; Harold Edwards, 
25; Larry Kudrowiiz. 25; Eric 
Makela, 34; Win. Sjogren, 34. 

Middle row, Win. G. Pearsall, 25 
years: Norval Swinford. 25; Jolui 
O. Walters, 25; Aaron Hawthorn, 25; 
Elmo H. Riggins, 25; Edward 
Gregory, 26; Alton F. Clements, 25; 
Clinton Diiggins, 25. 

Back row, A. P. Sclilosser, 25 
years; Malcolm Gilinore, 25; Otis 
Wade, 25; Carl Jackson, 34; Don 
Mayer, 31; Albert Meetz, 26; Steve 
Moshanko, 25; Howard E. Koeliler, 
25; Horace M. Adams, 25. 



Front row, A. O. Wend. 31 yaers; 
A. T. Mclntyre, Jr.. 32; G. F. 
Borders, 31; A. C. Zamper, 31; O. J. 
Hubbard, 29; Al Hudson. 29; Liician 
Ducharme. 31; Win. F. Heath. 31. 

Middle row, H. J. Billingsley. 31 
years; Win. Gee, 32; Walter Enliolm, 
32; John Sortino, 31; Fred Beam, 
34; W. C. Underwood, 31; George 
Matiis, 33; Joe Edenfield, 31. 

Back row, Robert Noreng. 26 
years; Merl Wilson, 32; Walter 
Franzen, 27; D. H. Hall, 30; Lewis 
Strickland, 32; E. L. Clarke, 32: 
Peter Stolk, 32; Earl Powers, Jr., 32; 
Richard Powers, 32. 



Front row, Roy Tucker. 30 years; 
Charles Valois, 30: Jos. Waxinunski, 
30; Mark Richardson. 30; Leonard 
Holbein. 30; Arthur Roberts, 30; 
Merle Mindler, 30; J. A. Lindstedt, 30. 

Middle row, Hyinan Maretsky, 

30 years: Larry Makela, 30: Carl 
Carlward, 30; Huston Williams. 30; 
Arthur J. Marsland, 30; Heiwy B. 
Smith, 30; Carl D. Baker, 31; Arthur 
Hebert, 31. 

Back row, Frank D. Thompson, 

31 years; Louis J. Perrero, 30; 
Edward Johnason, 30: Gordon Baum, 
32: Joseph Callioun, 30; Harold 
Pixley, 30; James Roe, 30; Wm. D. 
Burkholder, 31. 



Front row. Bob Reed, 26 years; 
Meiiis N. Anderson. 26: Lloyd Lady, 
26; S. M. McCrory, 26; Alfred C. 
Tate, 26; Jack Beagle, 26; Edward 




Teasley, 26; Charles Thrasher, 26. 
Middle row, Allen Fargason, 26 
years: Herman A. Thomas, 26: Geo. 
Herron, 26; Paul Joscsak. 26; Luther 
Nation. 26: C. P. Breidenslein, 30; T. 
E. Laughlin, 26; Geo. S. Williams, 26. 



Back row, Walter Banasiak, 26 
years; Ralph Brandt, 26; James 
Dvkes. 30; John Grantham, 26; 
Claud K. Miller, 26; W. E. Roberts, 
30; Eric Larson, 30; Francis A. 
Wilson, 30. 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



MIAMI, FLA. (continued) 



Front row, James T. Goodwyn, 
26 years: L. L. Niehaiis, 26; G. J. 
Hebert. 26: E. E. Herron, Sr.. 26; 
Eldon Schraeder. 26; M. E. Postoii, 
Sr., 26; Frank Jansen, 27; Niels 
Mclntyre, 27. 

Middle row, Ernest E. Powell, 27 
years: Wm. Velasquez, 28; J. M. 
Mathias, 28; Archie Booker. 27: Joe 
Newberry, 27; Vernon H. Rainey, 
27; Edw. Sandstrom, 28; Leroy P. 
Moore, 27. 

Back row, A. O. Sweat, 28 years; 
V. E. Laaksonen, 26; Geo. S. 
Alderman, 26; Sidney Weinstein, 26; 
John Sparkman, 26; Mahlon Gerard, 
26; C. B. Busby. 26; Henry Settak, 26. 



Front row, Theridge Jones, 26 
years: John Lewis, 25; Joseph Sciullo, 
25; James Kilroe, 25; Howard Birt, 
25; Johnnie Carter, 26; Chas. Sjogren, 
25: John Bigham, 25; Robt. 
Robitaille, 25. 

Middle row, M. E. Cannon, 27 
years: Carl A. Lewis, 26; Harold 
Peterson, 26: R. W. Patterson, 26; 
Roy B. Downey, 26; Ray Bessell, 26; 
Stanley Antosh, 27; Albert Babjak. 
27: Geo. Anderson, 26; Donald 
Edlin, 25. 

Back row, Raymond Jarvinen, 26 
years; Allen Jones, 26; Frank 
Capraro, 26; T. K. Underwood, 26; 
Dan E. Hartley, 26; W. H. Cunning- 
ham, 26; Merrill Calder, 26; Grover 
Bodiford, 26: James P. Hickman. 
27; Dominik Moretii, 26. 



Front row, Jos. Nicchirco, 35 years; 
A. N. Vickers. 39: Joseph Pluta, 35: 
Eugene Lamb, 36: Wesley Cory, 37. 

Back row, Paul Feige, 35 years: 
Floyd Stagmen, 37; Richard Abram- 
son, 35; Jach H. Maine, 37; Elias 
Ewing, 37; G. C. Vaughn. 35. 



a 

Three senior members of Local 993 
who received special plaudits at 
the meeting: Harold G. Jordahl, 
financial secretary, 49 years inember- 
ship: Albert Scheidigger, 47 years; 
and H. B. Reep, 47 years. 



J. W. Sharp is congratulated by 
Local 933 President Kenneth 
Berghuis upon receiving his 65-year 
membership pin. Also shown is In- 
ternational Representative Jack 
Sheppard, who presented the pin. 
and Wm. H. Brown, business agent. 
Sharp joined the Brotherhood on 
April 30, 1906 and rarely misses 
union meetings. 




FEBRUARY, 1973 



19 



FRESNO, CALIF. 

Members of Local 701 willi 25 
through 55 years of membership in 
the Brotlierhood were presented 
service pins at a ceremonial dinner in 
their honor, several months ago. 
Here are pictures of most of the 
honorees. Leonard Langenbuch, a 
60-year member, was uimble to 
attend. 

Especially honored were William 
Stoekle, holding the sytnbol of his 55 
years of service, and Claude Appleby, 
Leon Webster, and Clyde W. Clark, 
gathered around the 50-year sign. 

Joe Hausladen and Mrs. Hausladen, 
a 40-year member, are shown in one 
picture. 

The 35-year honorees are shown in 
one picture, witli three ^[•ives. These 
include, in foreground, Walter Locke; 
in center row, Fred J. Ebell, G. H. 
Hegqidst, and Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth 
Thompson: and in rear, E. H. Clack, 
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Zerlang, and 
Clifford Sherman. 

The 30-year members are shown in 
three photographs. In the first picture 
are W. E. Johnson, Vic Taylor. Clyde 
Bobo, Lester High, Pete Rago. Archie 
Johnson, and T. E. Gooden. In the 
second picture are William Gleim, 
Pete Rago, John Vang, Lloyd 
Woodward, and Sam Coffey. In the 
third, the first two men are 
unidentified; others are Jim Siegler, 
Pete Rago, and J. D. Howard. 

The 25-year members gathered for 
four group pictures (shown at the top 
of the opposite page). We regret that 
we do not have the names of 23 of 
those sliown. Identifications are as 
follows: 

In the first picture, front row, left 
to right, an unidentified member, Leo 
Weathers, William Bagwell, and 
George Enrich. Back row, left to 
right, Selso Gonzalas (unidentified), 
Arnold Popp (unidentified), George K. 
Brown (two unidentified members), 
and Elton Hance. 

In the second picture, front row, 
left to right, Andy Deveze, Barrel 
Harbert, Joe Collins, an unidentified 
member. Bill Bagwell, and George 
Enrich. In the back row, only George 
Mitchel, Viet Johnson, Arnold Popp, 
and Selso Gonzalas were identified. 



In the third picture, from left, are 
R. G. Fisher. Pete Rago, Carl Lang, 
Herbert Hamby, an unidentified 
member, George Hanoian, and still 
another tmknown. 

Finally, in the fourth picture, front 
row, left to right, Albert Gasink, Leo 
Wegley, Joe Collins, John Vang, 
George Enrich, and Marvin Hance. 
Back row, left to right, three are 
identified — Ron Cassle, R. G. Fischer, 
and Harry Enrich. 





20 



THE CARPENTER 



FRESNO, CALIF. (Continued) 




OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Local 1473 held its iiiuuiiil dinner 
'dance, last year, at the Blue Dolphin in 
San Leandro, Calif. Service pins ^■ere 
presented to several veteran members. 



Especially honored 11Y/5 Porter 
Fawcett. third from left, a 50-year 
member. Shown with him are: Jack 
Myers, president of the local union; 
General Rep. Clarence Briggs, Al Figone, 
financial secretary of the Bay Area 
District Cotincil; Joseph O'Siillivan. 
president of tite district council; and 
Anthony Ramos, financial secretary of 
the California State Cotincil of 
Carpenters. 



The 25-year pin recipients included: 
Front row, seated left to right, Clair 
Thyne. Porter Fawcett (50-years), Robert 
Abbadie, and Don Aldrich. Back row, 
Tom Coleman, Ed Donnell, Victor 
Roberts, Peter Schantz. Milt Tanner, 
James Sutton, Perino Vardaiiega, and 
James Donelson. 



The 30- and 35-year pin recipients 
included: Front row, left to right (all 
35-years of service), Holger Benson, 
Tony Fernandez. Porter Fawcett, C. A. 
Mcintosh, and Nels Swanson. Second 
row, left to right (all 30-years of service), 
L. W. McDowell, John Carman, L. G. 
Mele, Glenn Martin, C. A. Knutson. Ray 
Aro, Floyd Zaretzka, Chris Bossen. Chris 
Clark, Ivar Liindbcrg, and Clvde Smith. 



Tiflji'?^"";' jitj 




FEBRUARY, 1973 



21 




^ ' * 



/y^ 




d^Mm. 



J 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

On Friday evening. Octolicr 20. 
1972, the members of Carpenters 
Local 22 and their wives, numbering 
about 1500. attended a dinner at the 
Hilton Hotel in San Francisco, 
celebrating tite 90th anniversary of 
the local union and honoring 977 
members with 25 years or more of 
membersliip — totaling 31,368 years 
of continuous membership in our 
Brotherhood. 

Those honored nere: Lloyd Aarhus, 
Thomas P. Acton. Alfred Adams, 
yVilUam R. Adamson, Joseph Addiego, 
Ralph Alberigi, Ethan S. Allen, Winfred 
Allison, Martin .4/ipy, Ben Amaya, 
Joseph C. ,4naya. Axel .Anderson, Emil 
Andersen, Carl C. Anderson. Ole 
Anderson, Robert Anderson, Williain O. 
Anderson. Carl Anfinson. Manuel M. 
Apodaca, H. E. Aram, Manuel S. 
Aranjo, Albert Arala, L. .4rchinal, John 
Arnott, Kenneth Arntz. George Arras. 
Frank J. Aselio, N. W. Ashwonh, Leon 
H. Ayle. 

Frank Baber, Mario Baffico, Earl W. 
Bailey, L. F. Baker, Louis Balazs, Jr., 
George Balletto, Anione M. Bandarra, 
C. H. Barger, Frank E. Barger, John F. 
Barnes, Nathan Barnes, Leo Barrett, 
Harold Bartlett, Joseph Bartlett, Peter 
Basil, George Batha, Joseph Bawnaitn, 
George Baumgarlen, William R. Beam, 
Bart Beckman, Leslie E. Begin, Paul 
Belchar, Clinton H. Bell. O. S. Bell, 
Mario Beltrano, James G. Bemis, George 
O. Bendon, Anselm Benjamin. Robert 
Benson. Julien H. Bernier. Lello 
Bernardini, Frank E. Berg, Francis 
Bernie, Per B. Bertelsen, Raymond 
Bertils, Silvio Bessone, Emil Bettega, 
Theodore Bhend, Michael Biagini, Floyd 
Bible, Manuel Biedma, Julius C. Bishop, 
Stephen Bisio, Joseph D. Black, J. H. 



Blaedel. Stanley R. Block, Joint Bogiie, 
Sr., Secondo Boito, James A. Bolles, 
Carlo Bomben, O. Bonderud, Milron 
Booth, Carl Bording, William Brogen, 
Alex J. Borovkoff. Milton Bose, Edward 
Bourland, Louis C. Boyes, Ahin W. 
Brady, R. K. Brandemuehl. Arthur J. 
Branstrom. George Braitn. Leonard B. 
B ready, William H. Brewer, Melvin 
Bridwell, Carlton Lee Brown, James C. 
Brown, Lloyd J. Browit, Rollo Brown, 
T. H. Brown. Robert M. Brueck, Peter 
Bruno. R. P. Buchanan, N. S. BugUarello, 
Dale R. Barford. D. W. Burke, Thomas 
Burke, Howard L. Burns, Harold Burton, 
Ditaiie Busenbark, Benjamin Butler. 

Louis Cagle, Robert G. Cain, Alfred 
W. Cairns. Robert Call. George Callagy, 
Eli L. Calmels. Norman Cambra, Robert 
L. Catneron. Eugene Camgros. Joseph 
Camp. R. J. Campbell. Arthur A. 
Campos, Martin Cannon, John Caranlik, 
Roy Cardellini, Roland R. Carey, Frank 
E. Carlson. George S. Carlson, Rinaldo 
C. Carraro. Robert L. Carpenter, Frank 
.4. Castelan, Hinson Carter, J. H. 
Caruso, Nevin J. Cavero. Edwin E. 
Cary, Clifford C. Casey. Frank 
Castellano, B. W. Cebula. Vincent 
Ceccarelli. Amos Cendali, Jr., Ignacio J. 
Cervarich, Roy Chalslrom, Ivan C. 
Chapman, G. R. Clierry, Jobe Chiasson, 
John A. Chickosky. J. J. Christensen, 
Douglas Christian. Marvin B. 
Christenson. Joseph F. Ciatti. Cltarles A. 
Cirac, Ray Cirelli, C. A. Clancy. Frank 
Clark, L. M. Clark, Robert Cloney. 
Albert Cochelle. Frank J. Coen, John J. 
Coen, Bob Coffey, Alvin Cole, Melvin 
Cole, Robert F. Cole, Joseph Coleman, 
Earl W. Collins, Thomas F. Collins, 
Jim Connell, Alexander C. Cooper, 
Ralph Cornell, Louis Corsiglia, Pete 
Costanzo, Joseph Costello, Lawrence P. 
Costello, Alex L. Craig, Milton C. 
Creager, J. J. Creegan, Richard Crociani, 



Clinton J. Cronander, Donald Ciirtaz, 

Scott Dagley, Arthur Dablberg, 
Samuel Dahlberg. Edward E. Dahlstrom, 
Andrew Daiss, John Dake, Jr., Eugene 
Jack Dale, William Earl Dale, Jr., Carl 
Dallas, Clayton J. Dauphine, Walter 
Davalos, George T. Davidson, Ozel 
Davidson, E. E. Davis, Edgar G. Davis, 
Glenn Davis, Ira S. Davis. Roland B. 
Davis, Walter E. Davis, John Dawson, 
Jr., Quinto DeAntoni, Jack DeBarros, 
Edward M. DeBono, Leo L. DeCatnp, 
L. DeFanti. P. DeGrazio, Larry J. 
DelBncchia. Herman Deurloo. Charles 
R. Devereaax, A. DeYoung. Anthony 
Dichiera. Joseph DiVira, Robert Dias, 
Phillip Diaz, John Y. Dichian, Jr., 
Angelo J. Dichiera. Clyde F. Dietzen, 
Agoslino DiRegolo, Morris Domgard, 
Albert Donaghy, J. C. Donaldson. 
Alfred J. Dollosso. John Dorham. 
Jerome Dowdy, Hugh W. Dozier, C. H. 
Dresselhaus, William N. Drummond, 
.-Albert C. Dukes. Er\nii Dunaway. R. F. 
Duncan. Sr.. Jack Dtidley, E. H. Duncan, 
Robert F. Dunne. 

Joe Eberle. Eugene Egger. Lloyd 
Eiserman, Dave N. Flam. Bill Eldredge, 
Owen Ellis, George Emberton, C. 
Enevold, Robert E. Ensor, Ottavia 
Ercolino, Carl Eschler, Alfred D. Espino, 
George J. Etzel. 

Darald R. Fagley, Thomas Falconer, 
Howard R. Falk, Herman Falldorf, 
Charles Fallstrom, Egisto Fanti, Peter L. 
Felix, Victor Fellows, Michael Ferenc, 
Bob Ferguson, E. .4. Fessler. George 
P. Fessler, R. B. Feyling, Eric Fieber, 
Ray Finegan, Domenic Fiorello, Floyd 
M. Fiser. Louis Fit. Frank E. Fiispatrick, 
Daniel Flaherty, Joseph Flannery, 
Charles E. Fletcher, Sr., Robert Fletcher, 
James C. Fogelstrom, Hugo A. Fogde, 
Vincent Foley, Charles Foliotti, Robert 
O. Folkman, Harry Ford, Clyde W. 
Forsman, Emil Forsman, F. H. Foster, 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



Carl Franzeu, Charles S. Frederick. 
Russell Frederico, John T. Freeman. 
C. E. Frei, William J. Frizzell. 

W. E. Gale, James Callaway. Earnest 
Gallassi, Paul Gamhino. Virgil Gardner, 
Sr., Ralph Gatilr, Victor Gavron. F. P. 
Gehhard, Jr., Robert E. Georne, R. O 
George, Joe H. Germain, Adelard 
Geiiest, Priino Gesira, Philip Gestson, 
Walter Gbielmetti, George Giacomino, 
Joe Gianocca, W. T. Gihhs. J. Harris 
Giddings, Stephen I. Gilford. Frank 
Gilbert, John Giordano. Frank Girand, 
Elias Giske, Marvin Guddard. Jack M. 
Godsey, Ralph Goldenherg, Ray S. 
Gonsales, Trento Gori, R. S. Gowan, 
Leopoldo Gozzi, Ray Grant, Otis Z. 
Gray, LeRoy Griewe, James M. Grigg, 
William Graziano, Barney H. Green. 
Vernon Greenwood, Leslie Grill, .Arthur 
Grinde, Willicnn Grogaii, Clans Groth, 
Robert A. Grower. James D. Gniney, 

B. Giistafson, Earl Gnstafson. Stanley 
Gwartney. 

Jack Haapala, William F. Haecherl, 
Carl Hagen, Robert W. Haines, Alden 
Hall, Alvin A. Hall, A. R. Hull, Axel 
Hallberg, Herman Hallc/nist. .Albert E. 
Haitibelton, Charles Haitihelton. .Alfred 
Hamberg, John Hamilton, Richard G. 
Hamntel, Carl A. Hansen. H. Hanssen. 
Arnold Harold, James H. Harper. C. H. 
Hartman, Dan Harvey. A. Hustings. 
L. C. Hatlen, V. E. Haun. W. F. Hatiser. 
H. G. Hawley, Charles W. Haycock, 
James Heath, Stacey M. Heathcoek. 
Stephen Heckert. James F. Heffernan, 

A. G. Heglin, Toivo W. Helli. Coleman 
Hendon. Gordon C. Hendrickson. 
Giistave D. Hennig, Jr.. J. HenJiessy. 
Fred C. Hernandez, Lawrence Herndon, 
Henry Herbert, Bernahe Hernandez, 
William Hess. Gerald D. Hickman. R. D. 
Heitzman, Richard Hignera, Ralph Hill. 
Lloyd Hiller, William B. Hinkle, William 
S. Hodges, Ben Hoecker. Harris Hoecker, 
John Hoetn, William Hoem, Edward 
Holte, Anthony Holman. William D. 
Holster, Fred S. Horst, E. Horsiman. 
Gnnnar Horte, John Hovdal. .-Mian D. 
Howard, Jess Howard, Harold E. 
Howell, Arthur J. Howlett, L. L. 
Hnffaker, R. C. Hnffaker, Albert 
Hughes, Floyd O. Hughes, James E. 
Hull, William C. Hume, Frank .4. 
Hunsinger, Louis J. Hunt. Lloyd Hunter, 
William Hunter, George W. Husak. 
Ralph E. Hutchins, William .A. Hyers. 

Edward R. lorio, William J. Irwin, 
W. Isaacson, Walter Isaefj, Sam Izzo. 

Roland Jacks, Fred Jans, Emanuel 
Jenseit, Gordon Jensen, Ralph Jeirsen, 
Robert D. Jensen, Jose Jiminez. Eugene 
Johe. Lenard H. Johanson. Carl Johnson, 
Earl Johnson, Edgar G. Johnson, Glen 
G. Johnson, J. F. Johnson. Harold ,A. 
Johnson, John Johnson. LeRoy Johnson, 
Robert E. Johnson. Russell P. Johnson, 
Theodore Johnson. David C. Johnston. 
H. F. Johnston. Emil Joki. Halvtn- 
Jokstad, Dewey Jones, Edisoit W. Jones, 

C. H. Jordan, Donald L. Junkin. 
Elmo F. Kale, George Kalleg. Oscar 

Kallqnist, Frank Kammerer, Harry 
Kunewske, Erick Karell, William Karl. 

B. Franklin Kegg, Patrick Kelly. Harry 
Kehnan, John Kenison, Lyman Kenison, 
Melvin R. Kenney. Peter Kephart. 
Archie Kidd, Ernest G. Killgore. Ehnond 
P. Kerling, Durwood Kinder. Willis E. 
Kinter, Williaiti Kirner, y\ Klaes, Lee 
Klahn, Henry Klemm, Stanley Knight, 
Herman Koepff, John J. Koino, William 
Komo, Andrew Koval, Jr.. Robert 
Krohn, Ivan Kuchan, John Kuha, LeRoy 
H. Kuhn, Frank Kurpitisky, M, Kvaitime. 



George E. Labo, W. T. Lahli, Leonard 
Lahtinen, Robert Lull, Lester LaMar, 
Charles Lamb, Raymond A. Lamport. 
.Alfred Lancaster, John D. Lang, Alhin 
Larson, Eniil Larson, Gust Larson, 
Venter Larson, Wilbur B. Larson, 
Theodore Lauridsen, Roger Lawhorn, 

D. F. Lawson, Ed Lawrenz, Henry W. 
Lazzarini. H aider Lee, A. G. Lehman, 
Ernest E. Lehman, Abe Lehto, Alfred 
R. LeMar. Herbert Letin, N. D. 
Lenander, Philip M. Letoiirneau, Henry 
J. Levinski. Entile W. Lewis. Dave ■ 
Lewis, John H. Lewis, Henry N. Lind, 
Kenneth Kurt Lind, Roy Lind, Herbert 
G. Lindberg, Clifford Lindquist, Lennart 
Lindqiiist, Robert Lindquist, Robert V. 
Lindqnist. J. .A. Lingeman. Lawrence L. 
Linton. Joe Locatelli. George Wesley 
Lockard, W. J. Lo.scutoff, William M. 
Loswick, Joseph J. Loughran, Henry 
Van Love. Frank Liidwig. Carl Lund, 
Remo E. Luzzi. 

.Anthony Madden, Ernest Maffei, 
C. A. Major, Carl A. Mandel, Ed 
Mandt, Thomas Manton, Ralph L. 
Murchion, Michael John Marconi, 
Michael Markofj, Harry Markussen, .41 
Martin, Harry Martin, Hector Martin, 
John F. Martin, John P. Martin, J. A. 
Martinez, Modesto Martinez, Leo I. 
Martini, George J. Martisus. Donald E. 
Mason, Ernest Massoletti, Silvio V. 
Mas.mletii, Harry W. Matlock, Carlos 
R. Mattson, Howard W. Mattson, Oscar 
Mauden. A. L. Maurice. Vernon Mayta, 
Eugene Medina, Clarence Medley, Denis 
Mehigan, Ben M. Melcher, Matt .Melny, 
Robert Menzies, Jr., Paid Mericle, R. 
Miailovich, Walter Michael, John 
Middleweerd, .Antonio Midile, Chas. J. 
Mignosa, Harold Miller. James Miller, 
Phillip Miller. Walter E. Miller. Willard 
H. Miller, William G. Miller, Edward A. 
Moeller, Albert Moerman. Renaldo 
Montegari, J. P. Montgomery, Fernando 
Moreno, Leo Motet, Leo Morelton, 
Thomas Mueller, Frank Mullan, Thomas 
P. .Mullen. Harry J. Mullin, Dan W. 
Mullins. John Munson, Allan A. 
.Murdoch. W. Murdock. William 
Murphy. William T, Murphy, .Aurelio 
John Musante. Roland Musanle. 

Donald MacLean, C. O. McCamish, 
Lewis J. McDennott, William F. 
McDonagh, Eugene McDottough, 
Alexander McDonald, Frank McDonald, 
Merlon McDonald. Arthur McDougal, 
Patrick J. McGee. Jack C. McElrov. 
James O. McGuughy. Albert B. McKay, 
Leslie G. McKav, R. McKeever, D. U. 
McKell, J. Mckenna, J. W. McKinney, 
Frank McMahon. Clyde McNetl. 

David L. Nagel, Simon Nann, George 
Narlock, S. J. Nason, Peter Nave, Robert 
W. Nehel, Andrew Neenan, William B. 
Neff, Venter R. Neilsen, Chester Nelson, 
Edward F. Nelson. Harold N. Nelson, 
H. Nelson, her H. Nelson, Odell E. 
Nelson, Robert L. Nelson, Waller W. 
Nelson, S. .4. Nemeth, Sylvester F. 
Neumann. C. E. Newell, David Nicholas, 

E. J. Nielsen, Milton F. Nielsen, V. P. 
Nielson, Harold Nobles, Albert 
Nordstrom, Michael Novak, J. E. Niiitn, 
P. A. Nye. 

J. J. Oherlercher. R. F. Occhipinli. 
Richard Occhipinti, Peter G. Ochoa, 
Donald F. Odgers. Fred Oeverndiek, 
Leo Olbrvch, Melvin Olsen, Carl O. 
Olson, J. B. Olson, R. W. Olson, William 
Onick, Caesar Orsi, Carl W. Owen, 
Edward E. O^Brien, Terry F. O'Briett, 
John O'Connell. Robert J. O'Connell. 
Eugene F. O'Coimor, James O'Sullivan, 
Joseph O'Sullivan. 

Eilif Paasche, B. F. Pace, William H. 




LA GRANGE, ILL. 

On September 22, 1972, Waldo 
Ericksoii was presented with his 50- 
year pin at the La Grange Cummuiuty 
.Memorial Hospital. He was initialed 
Septeittber 1 , 1922. Making the 
presentation was Rudy Perisich, 
president. Local 1 128. Also attending 
was Frank J. Dyorak. business 
representative, and Richard Skoda, 
member of the local. Word was 
received that Brother Erickson passed 
away the following Monday, 
September 25, at the age of 70. 

He had been a fireman of the 
Western Springs. III., volunteer fire 
department since 1919. In 1933 he 
became fire chief and in 1970, fire 
marshal. 

Pictured left to right (all tnemhcrs 
of Local 1128) are Waif red 
Kohlstrom, 60-year ntember. Waldo 
Erickson, and Albert Liindin, 62-year 
member. 



Paczoch, L. H. Page, W. E. Pallas. Carl 
V. Palm, Bruno Paolinelli, Jesse G. 
Paramore, Ed. V. Parenti, John C. 
Pustorino, William G. Patrick, Edward 
S. Payne, John J. Payne, Steve Pavlich, 
William H. Peach. Connie Pearson, 
Charles J. Peart. William Pelster, C. H. 
Pemherton, Bruce A. Pendleton. Fred 
Pendleton, Guido Pera, Ronald Perkins, 
Joseph Peter, Ralph Peters. .Arvid 
Peterson. Earl G. Peterson. Roy 
Peterson, William D. Peterson. William 
E. Peterson. D. B. Phillips. D. O. 
Phillips Roy D. Phillips. Janws J. 
Picaso, C. A. Pierce, Augustino Pieretti, 
Paulino Pina. Robert Pioli, .Arthur Pisila, 
John J. Pittavnio, J. E. Pitman. Elton 
Poitz, Aristide Polino. .Mario Ponte, 
Biarne Pors. Frank Port mutt. Jr.. .Arthur 
Pomerenke, John J. Poppin, T. L. 
Prea.se, Charles Prielipp, Edward 
Proctor, Livio A. Puccetti, Mario 
Pucceeti, Eugene Pitcci. Clyde F. Puett, 
Eugene R. Purlell. 

Herbert C. Ouantz. Robert H. Qtiinn. 

Giacoino Raccaitello, Robert W. 
Radcliff. George R. Radoff, August 
Rahlves, Salvatore Rakele. I. B. 
Ramstead, Henry Randhahn, L. M. 
Randies, Alfonso Re, Honter G. Reddick, 
Timothy Reen, A. L. Reiithard. Maurice 
Reid. Robert H. Reid. W. Reinmy. 
Kenneth H. Revander, Foster Reynolds, 
Joltit Reynolds, William G. Rice. Frank 
Richard. Frattcis Richards. Bill 
Richardsott. Waldo Richardsoit. Max R. 
Richter. Alfred G. Rindal, John H. 
Roberts, Roy R. Roberts, .Aitdrew 
Robertson, Paul W. Robertsoit, A. H. 
Robinsott, Evait Robinson, George T. 
Robinsott, David E. Roche, J. Rockwell, 
Johnnie W. Rogers, Everett Rogers, R. T. 
Rogers, Walter Rogers, George Rohrs, 

Continued on next page 



FEBRUARY, 1973 



23 



SAN FRANICISCO, CALIF. 
Continued from preceding page 

Julio Romero, Frank Ronicke, O. 
Roniieberg. James C. Roofeiier, Maurice 
Rosaiio, Robert Rosemont, P. W. 
Roseiihaum, Clinton E. Ross, Sr., John 
Rossi, John M. Rndometkin, ,V. 
Riidometkin, Henry Rnf:geri, Raymond 
Riishina, Ivan E. Ryan, Eino O. 
Ryynanen. 

Alhin Saari. William Salih, Floyd 
Samples. Sterling O. Samples, Victor 
Sanderson, William Sandkulla, Vincent 
Sangervasi, George A. Sanguinetti, 
Angelo Santamaria, Walter Sarlin, 
Ahin Sarniento, J. Sass, W. E. 
Sattehnayer, V. M. Saukko, Clark 
Saxton, John Scaduto. Clifford E. 
Scanlon. Joseph Scarahosio, Raymond C. 
Schelegle, Herbert Schenk, A. 
SchUirmann, L. J. Schnapp, Fred 
Schneider, Herman Schneider, Henry 
Schiiliheiss, Jack Schiiltz, Irwin Schnltz, 
Milton Schupbach, George Schuster, 
Fred Schwarz, Helmer Seaberg, Vincent 
Seeno, Sam Sekols, Simon P. Selman, 
Henry Semeit, Abert P. Serio, W. C. 
Shafer, J. E. Sherrington, Charles 
Shields, Larry Shipman, William H. 
Short, Claude Shiiey, Chester M. 
Shumate. Pete W. Siliznoff. Jake V. 
Simoitich, Joseph F. Sinor. Ralph E. 
Sisson. Ole Sletwoll, Russell W. Sniale, 
C. R. Smith, Charlie Harold Smith, 
Clarence P. Smith, Dean Smith, James 



W. Smith, Leroy A. Smith, R. C. Smith, 
Robert Cole Smith, Samuel P. Smith, 
P. D. Snedaker, Joseph Soares, Edwin 
Soderhiud, Chris Sollid, D. If. Soloman, 
James A. Sorettsen, Joseph S. Sousa, 
Jack D. Spear, John F. Sperisen, C. W. 
Spiker, Philip Spitras, Sydney Spruit, 
Eric E. St. Denis, Alfred Staff, Joseph 
Staffy. .Morris Stein, Ralph G. Stein. A. 
Steinauer. N. G. Steiner. A. Sten, H. A. 
Stephens, Bryant H. Sterling, Charles R. 
Stich. Adroit B. Stormettt. Homer Fay 
Stout, Harry H. Strait, Howard P. Straw, 
Robert E. Strawther. A. T. Strickland, 
Frank Strnckmeyer, Rayttu^nd P. Stupi, 
William Sturla, Edward W. Suvanto, 
Tony Sukle, J. J. Sullivan, R. H. 
Sundquisl. Gunnar Svenningsen, Otto L. 
Suter, Charles Swaiko, Jack Sweett, 
Milton Sykes, E. Sylvester. 

Harold Taber. Charles H. Tndlock, 
Salvatore Tassone, Edward Tamraz, 
Harold David Taylor, Charles L. Terry, 
Jr., Griff Thomas, William Teiiher, 
Louis M. Thomas, Willy Carl Thorns, 
Claude Thompson, Cuba Thompson, 
Newton A. Thompson. James Thome. 
Paul S. Thorsteinsou. Albert J. Thrush, 
Gordon Thyreti, Aldo Tigri. Robert E. 
Tipton. George W. Tolley. Stephen Tom, 
Joe Traingale. Frank R. Trtinnels. 
Bernhard TuUinen. Enrique C. Trujillo, 
Parker E. Tucker. Melvin W. Turri, 
David G. Tyler. 

Henry Ute. 

Nat. F. Vaira. L. Vallans, George 



Vanderberg. Robert A. Vandevoir, A. B. 
Varner, Joseph Varrone, Carl Vedell, 
Kuute Vestre, Audio Vick, A. J. Vickers. 
John VoUen, Eugene P. Vollstedt. Oleg 
D. Von Korff, Louis Volpe, Vernon 
Viiolas. 

Martin Waddell, Edgar P. Wagers. 
C. IValdheim. Albert F. Walker. .August 
Walker. Martin E. Walker, Delhert .4. 
Wallace, Fred Ward, John F. Warda, 
Joseph Warda, Dale C. Warman, Paul 
Warner. Floyd Warnock, Earl F. Warren, 
Charlie Washam. Oscar E. Washam, 
William R. Watkins, Leroy Watson, 
Fwing Watt, John M. Watts. G. S. Way, 
Robert V. Waylett, Thomas R. Wengler, 
Joh}t Wetistrcnn. Elmer Westbrook, 
George E. Westjall. Cecil Westinan, 
John J. Wetsch, Albert White, Chester 
White, Edgar L. White, Guy John White, 
Harry Wiedenkojer, Reinhold Wiese, 
Charles W. Wilburn, Kenneth .A. 
Will ford. Jewell D. Williams. Randall 
Williams. Denzil S. Willis, Albert S. 
Wilson, Woodrow Wilson, William E. 
Wininger, Chester H. Winningstad. 
.Ammon Witmer, Matthew Wolfle. Edgar 
A. Wooden. Michael Woods. Thomas S. 
Woods, Lowell A. Wright, Richard F. 
Wright. William Wroe, Jack Wruble, 
C. D. Wrye. 

James R. York. 

H. G. Zabriskie, Victor J. Zakoinik, 
Peter R. Zanatta, Walter Zecker. 
Fred Ziakoff, Joseph Zielen, Thomas 
L. Ziiber. 




^™* 



..S"**^- ■ 




ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. 

At a special called meeting of Local 
531, Van Pittmati, Interimtiona! 
Representative and Patil Long, D.C.B.A. 
presented 25- and 50-year pins to the 
following members. Seated left to right, 
R. Anderson, R. Minella Sr., E. Co.x, 
E. Johnson, J. Moratin, W. Knecht, 
J. Kristian, C. Drolett. C. LeCry. 

Second row, J. Johns, A. Ferrone, 
G. Remaley, J. Coleman, M. DeBari, 
P. Souto, L. Heffern. L. Hamm. 
K. House, W. Johnsen, M, Kilbiirn. 

Third row, W. Highfield, G. Bennett, 
A. Lottnonen, W. Solay, J. Hoffses, 
J. Sanger, J. Marisko, H. Fallen, 
D. Anderson. 



Fourth row, dignitaries uiui officers 
who helped with the presetitation: 

B. Scoggins. warden. E. Wood, conductor. 
Van Pittman, LR., Paul Long, D.C.B.A., 

C. Bowman, trustee, L. Clester, B.A., 
W. Hart, president, M. Beck, trustee, 
C. Ganger, trustee. 




PETALUMA, CALIF. 

One of those 
honored by Local 
981 for his many 
years of service to 
the Brotherhood is 
Lyn Bryan, recent 
recipient of a 50- 
year service pin. 



24 



THE CARPENTER 




GOSSIP 



SEND YOUR FAVORITES TO: 

PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONSTITUTION 

AVE. NV/, WASH.. D.C. 20001. 

SORRY, BUT NO PAYMENT MADE 

AND POETRY NOT ACCEPTED. 



No Gnus Is Bad News! 

The lion and his mate were looking 
for food when they came on a group 
of six gnus. The lion quicky dispatch- 
ed the six with practiced slashes. Then 
he turned to his mate and proclaimed: 
"That is the end of the gnus. The 
time Is 6:29!" — hienry Kemjker, Em- 
poria, Kansas. 



TELL M U R UNION! 




Mum's The Word 

Said the lady of the house to the 
new maid: "When you're serving to- 
night, be sure not to spill anything." 

"Don't worry," reassured the maid. 
"I won't say a word!" 

UNION-MADE IS WELL-MADE 

The Eternal Triangle 

"I had a different date last night; 
went out with a couple of Siamese 
twins . . . sisters." 

"That's unusual! Did you have a 
good time. " 

"Well, yes and no! ' 

WORK SAFELY— ACCIDENTS HURT 

This Was No Waltz! 

An apprentice showed up on the 
building site swathed in bandages. 
When asked what happened, he said. 




"Well, my girl and I were dancing 
last night when her father came 
home. He really v/orked me over! 
You know hov/ deaf he is ... he 
couldn't hear the music! " — D. D. 
Domich, College, Park, Md. 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 

Daffynitions 

Army bugle — Muster piece 
Birth control — Family fewed 
Income tax — Status woe 
■Junk Yard — Abused car lot 
Lumberyard — Lath roundup 
Nursery — Bawl room 
Bible — A blest seller 

BUY ONLY UNION-MADE TOOLS 

Very Punny Story 

Two fraternity brothers from a 
Sigma Chi chapter, touring Sweden, 
bought a statue which was then erect- 
ed in the frat house garden. It is 
known as The Swede Art of Sigma 
Chi. 

R U COIN 2 D UNION MEETING? 

From Bath to Worse! 

Two hippies met in the woods. "Is 
there any place around to take a 
bath?" asked Hip No. I. 

"Well, I bathe in the spring," re- 
plied Bum No. 2. 

"I didn't ask when ... I asked 
where!" came back Crumb No. I. 

R U REGISTERED 2 VOTE.> 

Conservation Moves 

Big and bold on the bumper sticker 
was: "If you drive don't drink." 
In smaller type under it followed: 



This Month's Limerick 

There was a young girl in the choir 
Whose voice rose higher and 
higher 
One Saturday night 
It rose out of sight 
And now It's up in the spire. — John 
Freeman, L.U. 22, San Francisco. 



"You might hit a bump and spill 
some." 

That's in similar vein to the sign 
at the school crossing which said: 
"Slow down . . . don't hit a child." 
And in a childish scrawl beneath It: 
"Walt for a teacher." 

UNITED WE STAND 

Oarsman's Delight 

The disgruntled model at Miami 
Beach was complaining to her room- 
mate about her date of the night 
before. "Not only did the rat lie to 
me about the size of his yacht . . . 
he made me do all the rowing!" 

1 4 ALL— ALL 4 1 




Equal to The Pay 

The feminists who keep insisting 
that women ought to get men's wages 
forget what happens in married men's 
homes every payday. 

LIKE TOOLS, BE SHARP & SAFE 

Taking a Back Seat? 

When the movie actor went to the 
supermarket, the checker kept star- 
ing at him until she finally blurted: 
"Excuse me, but don't I know you 
from somev^here? " 

He smiled tolerantly and replied: 
"I think maybe you saw me at the 
movies." 

"That must be It," agreed the 
checker. "Where do you usually sit?" 

BUY AT UNION RETAIL STORES 

Twenty Years Late 

The elderly executive had returned 
from his first trip to Paris, "hlow did 
you like Paris, J.B.?" asked another 
executive. 

"Great," said J.B., "but I wish I 
had taken the trip 20 years ago." 

"Oh, yes," leered his friend, "when 
Paris was really Paris, eh?" 

"No," he sadly replied, "when J.B. 
was really J.B.!" 



FEBRUARY, 1973 



25 



IVlemhers Authors 






Songs from the Miners 
Dramatized in New Book 

■ Historians are in general agreement that nothing 
dramatizes revolutionary struggles more than the folk 
songs which develop as a natural outgrowth of deep 
feelings involved. If this is true, nobody in the nation 
is better equipped to analyze the continuing battles 
of working people struggling to achieve their place 
in the sun than Archie Green, a member of Local 
Union 1149, San Francisco. 

Archie Green has been a professor of English and 
of labor and industrial relations at the University of 
Illinois for a good number of years. Recently he re- 
signed as a full professor at the University of Illinois 
to accept a teaching assignment at the Labor Studies 
Center in Washington, D.C. — an educational arm of 
the AFL-CIO. 

Folk music is one of his first loves and, through 
years of study in this field, he has become one of the 
country's most respected authorities. 

His latest contribution to the origins and develop- 
ment of folk music is a scholarly book entitled Only 
A Miner. It deals primarily with the growth of 
folk songs among the nation s miners, as they strug- 
gled to organize and nurture a union capable of cop- 
ing with the fierce exploitation that existed for hun- 
dreds of years prior to the Civil War. 

No segment of the American labor movement has 
been beset by as much turbulence and strife as the 
efforts of the miners to build an effective and viable 
union. Bloodshed has been commonplace in many 
encounters with company police, hired assassins, and 
professional strike breakers. Arrogant employers and 
politically ambitious union officers have plagued the 
miners' organization for generations. As a result of 
the great struggles which have led to periodic up- 
heavals in the miners' union, a great body of protest 
songs has developed. Archie Green has traced them 
all back to their origins, and he has summarized the 
contributions these songs have made to the cause of 
the miners' union struggle for decent wages and safe 
working conditions. No one can truly appreciate the 
long and continuing fight which the nation's miners 
have carried on without reading Brother Green's 
book. Only A Miner. ■ 

ONLY A MINER by Archie Green. Copyright 1972, 
Published by University of Illinois Press, Urbana, 111., 
219 pp., $7'.50. 




Lure of Lost Treasures 
Inspires The Gold Hex' 

B There is hardly a man alive who has not dreamed 
of hunting and finding lost treasures in the sun or in 
the bowels of the earth. While 999 out of 1,000 are 
content to dream such dreams, a Brotherhood mem- 
ber. Ken Marquis of Local 944, San Bernardino, 
Calif., has spent a lifetime chasing the legendary bo- 
nanzas which flourish throughout the Far West. 

There is hardly a played-out mining camp in Cali- 
fornia, Arizona, New Mexico, and Nevada which 
does not have a legend of a lost mine or a buried 
treasure. Ken Marquis has chased most of them for 
years. 

Unfortunately, he did not find any of them. Now 
he has written a book entitled, Gold Hex. 

In it he tells of each of the legends which he 
has pursued diligently. To his credit, he is not sel- 
fish. For the benefit of his readers he spells out each 
of the legendary treasures and the hints or maps or 
other evidence which supposedly prove the existence 
of the treasure. For those with the time, the means, 
and the adventurous spirit to follow up the leads 
spelled out by Brother Marquis, the big strike may 
be just around the corner and over the next ridge. 

Few readers of The Carpenter probably will be mo- 
tivated to drop everything and head for the West 
by reading Brother Marquis's account of Eldorado, 
but for armchair adventurers it does afford some in- 
spiration for dreams which most of us dreamed in 
days gone by. ■ 

The GOLD HEX by Ken Marquis, Copyright 1972, 
Published by H. Glenn Carson Enterprises. Ltd., 801 
Juniper, Boulder, Colo. 80302. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



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Young Men Train 
In DC-Maryland 




Apprentice Frank Federici ponders a 
problem in class. 




Milton Hall, an apprentice, working 
on a cabinet in the workshop of the 
Maryland campus. 




A toolbox project nnderway. 

Job Training Aids 
Older Men's Status 

Two routes to higher pay for men 
over 45 are unionization and job train- 
ing, according to a study released re- 
cently by the U.S. Department of La- 
bor's Manpower Administration. 

Good health and voluntary job 
changing also help, the study suggests. 

In most occupations, the study indi- 
cates, organized workers do better by 
almost every measure — tenure, pay 
and pension coverage, for example — 
than the unorganized. 

The findings of the study are con- 
tained in a report based on a five-year 
survey of the labor market experience 
of men who were between 45 and 59 
when the survey began. 



APPRENTICE CONTESTS 
CALENDAR, FEBRUARY, 1973 

We are pleased to have received noti- 
fication from the following states and 
provinces of their intent to participate in 
the 1973 Internationa! Carpenters Ap- 
prenticeship Contest. This is. of course, 
only a partial listing and is subject to 
change. This calendar will appear in The 
Carpenter each month, showing addi- 
tional states and provinces and also 
changes or additions in the categories in 
which contestants will be entered. 







Mill 




Stale Carpenter 


Cabinet 


Millw 


Alabama 


X 






Arizona 


X 




X 


California 




X 


X 


Colorado 


X 


X 


X 


Delaware 


X 






Dist. of Col. 








& Vic. 


X 


X 


X 


Florida 


X 




? 


Illinois 


X 


X 


X 


Indiana 


X 


X 




Iowa 


X 


X 


X 


Kansas 


X 




X 


Louisiana 






X 


Maryland 


X 


X 


X 


Massachusetts 


X 


X 




Michigan 


X 


? 


X 


New Jersey 


X 


X 


X 


New York 


X 


X 




Ohio 


X 




X 


Oklahoma 


X 


X 


X 


Pennsylvania 


X 


X 


X 


Texas 


X 


X 


X 


Virginia 






X 


Washington 


X 


X 


X 


West Virginia 


.X 




X 


Wisconsin 


X 






British Col. 


X 






Ontario 


X 




X 


Total 


24 


14 


18 



New Journeyman at Oakland 

Graduation certificates were recently presented to two youny 
men in ceremonies at Oakland, Calif. Accepting journeyman 
certificates, left, were George Madrigal and James Milne (for 
his son, Gordon). Making the presentations were Local 1473 
President .Tack Myers and Financial Secretary .lack Kirkman. 




FEBRUARY, 1973 



27 




Do's and Don'ts When Using Cold Chisels, 
Punches and Other Struck or Hammered Tools 



■ All professional mechanics use 
cold chisels, punches, star drills, 
etc., for certain jobs. These are the 
use-related tools struck with ham- 
mers and other striking tools. Im- 
proper use of these tools can be 
very hazardous. 

If you examine a new cold chisel, 
for example, you will see that the 
head or hammered surface has a 
crown radius — it's not flat. Notice 
also that there is a generous bevel 
between this surface and the sides 
of the tool. This design directs the 
force of blows toward the center or 
body of the tool. If you use the 
proper hammer to strike the chisel 
it will have the same design charac- 
teristics. 



CROWN RADIUS <=—y—._^ -> BEVEL 



If you use a cold chisel, punch 
or rock drill with a mushroomed, 
battered or chipped head, you are 
cancelling out all the benefits of 
proper tool design. Still worse, you 
are courting accident and injury 
through use of a tool which should 
be discarded. Dullness also is bad. 
The angle and thickness of the cut- 
ting edges of tools are designed to 
give maximum cut and durability. 



When the cutting edge becomes 
dull, not only does the cutting ability 
decrease, but the durability is dras- 
tically reduced. Many failures are 
caused by dullness. 




Cold chisels are of several types 
— flat, cape, diamond point and 
round nose; the most widely used is 
the flat type. Cold chisels are de- 
signed for cutting and chipping cold 
metal (steel, cast and wrought iron, 
aluminum, brass, copper, etc.). 
They should never be used on stone 
or concrete. 



Center 



i 



Pin 



Dflft 



Hand punches are made in five 
popular patterns — prick, center, 
pin, rivet and drift. They are de- 



signed for punching holes in metal 
and other materials, marking metal, 
driving and removing pins and riv- 
ets, and aligning holes in different 
sections of metal. They should 
never be used on stone or concrete. 




CUTTING EDGES 

Star drills are designed for drill- 
ing holes in masonry (stone, con- 
crete, brick, etc.). They should be 
struck squarely with a heavy hand 
drilling hammer or sledge and the 
drill should be rotated after each 
blow. 



X 



:a 



/ 

HEAD 



Brick chisels are designed for 
scoring and cutting brick. They 
should be struck with a hand drill- 
ing or mash hammer — not a brick- 
layer's hammer, and they should 
never be used on metal. 

Here are the basic do's and don'ts 
which apply to the use of struck 
tools. 

1. Always wear safety goggles to 
protect your eyes. 



28 



THE C ARPENTE R 



2. Never use a tool with chipped, 
battered or mushroomed head. 

3. Never use a punch if point is 
dull, chipped or out-of-square. The 
point can be reground if properly 
done. 

4. Never use a nail hammer to 
strike cold chisels, punches, etc., 
since the face may chip and possibly 
result not only in damage to the 
hammer, but also an eye or other 
bodily injury. 

5. Use a ball pein hammer of the 
proper size, a hand drilling or mash 
hammer, or a sledge. The face of 
the hammer should be proportion- 
ately larger than the head of the 
struck tool. For example, a '2 -inch 
cold chisel requires at least a 1-inch 
hammer. 




6. Never strike with a hammer 
iiaving a loose or damaged handle. 

7. Keep all cutting edges sharp 
and properly ground lo the correct 
bevel. 

8. Hammer blows should always 
be struck squarely with the ham- 
mer face parallel with the surface 
being struck. Avoid glancing blows 
and over and under strikes. 



A very comprehensive booklet, 
"Proper Uses and Common Abuses 
of Striking and Struck Tools." con- 
tains detailed sharpening instruc- 
tions. Copies may be obtained by 
sending 250 to the Service Tools 
Institute, 331 Madison Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. 10017. 



for Spare Time or Fo/I Time 
Income, Here's How To Earn 



SHARPENING 




Here's a proven practical 
way to earn extra dol- 
lars in spare time^ 
to develop money- 
..„ , making re- 

pair business of 
your own. In- 
vestment is 
small. There's 
no overhead, 
no stock of 
goods to carry. 
No experience 
needed, no can- 
vassing. You do it 
with the famous 
Foley Saw Filer that au- 
tomatically sharpens all kinds 
of saws — and the Lawn 
Mower Grinder that precision 
sharpens all types of mowers. 



EARN UP TO $6 AN 
HOUR IN SPARE TIME 



Hundreds of people like yourself are making cash like 
this — $20 to $30 a week — right now in spare time. "My 
spare time saw filing business has made me $952 these 
first ten months" — says R. T. Chapman. Many have 
built a complete sharpening service with such year- 
around profits. You can too, simply by following the 
sure, easy Foley Plan. 



Get Free Book Now ''Money Making Facts'' 

This valuable book shows you how to start, how to get business from home 
owners, factories, carpenters, etc., and how to make profits fast. Mall coupon 
today. No salesman will call. 




I n Saw Filer 
. information. 



FOLEY MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

218-3 Foley Building. Minneapolis. Minnesota 55418 



I I Lawn Mower 

Sharpener information. 



[ ! Money Making 
Facts booklet. 



NAME_ 



ADDRESS- 
CITY 



.STATE- 



_ZIP- 



FEBRU ARY, 1973 



29 




?-SA 



IT ISN'T, UNLESS YOU HAVE THE I : CLIC LAPEL PIN ! 




Tools of the craft are repre- 
sented in the 1973 CLIC em- 
blem — the hammer, the plane, 
the logger's peavey, and the 
millwright's micrometer scale. 



The 1973 CLIC membership pin is just out. Like the other 
CLIC pins in your collection, it stands for good candidates for 
public office and good government. 

The political fact of life is this: You can't get laws which are 
fair to labor and to the working man and his family, unless you 
contribute to the campaigns of labor's friends in Congress and 
support the year-around program of the Carpenters Legislative 
Improvement Committee. Your $10 contribution to CLIC goes a 
long way . . . and it adds to your button collection with a shiny 
new gold emblem for 1973. Get your pin now! 



Carpei^ters Legislative iMPROVEMENT Committee 




LOCAL UNION NEWS 



i^M»iS-Ma!5a r«J,;.--:fci.- ,,::.. : ,a'.» ■ lst!^J I^Xrj!^JfS!»S>»S!^tSsfT- 



Peiiii State Cliarter 
For Housing Plan 

On September 2, 1972 the Pennsyl- 
vania State Council of the United Broth- 
erhood of Carpenters & Joiners of Ameri- 
ca was granted a non-profit charter as a 
corporation now known as Carpenters of 
Pennsylvania, Inc. 

The purpose of forming a corporation 
is to get into the housing field. The Coun- 
cil plans to build in the low and moder- 
ate-income housing field. It wants to im- 
prove the prevailing wage situation and 
also create more work. 

The secretary of the Department of 
Community Aft'airs for the Common- 
wealth of Pennsylvania was expected to 
present the certifying check to the Coun- 
cil, but he was on an inspection tour of 
the flooded areas of Pennsylvania at the 
time. 

Governor Milton Shapp sent his best 
wishes to the state convention and con- 
gratulated the Pennsylvania State Council 
for its progressive action. 

Roast-Pig Picnic 
For Lajolla Local 




At Pennsylvania charter ceremonies, left to right, Michael D. Banko, Jr., executive 
director. Carpenters of Pa., Inc.; Raymond Ginnetti, vice president, Carpenters of Penn. 
sylvania. Inc.; Frank Diehl, regional manager. Department of Community Affairs; 
George M. Walish, president, Carpenters of Pennsylvania, Inc.; Robert P. Argentine, 
secretary, Carpenters of Pennsylvania, Inc.; Robert H. Getz, vice president, Carpenters 
of Pennsylvania, Inc., and Charles Pumilia, director, Carpenters of Pennsylvania, Inc. 
Edward S. Goldstein is also a director of Carpenters of Pennsylvania, Inc., but was 
not present for the picture. 

Frank Diehl presented a $50,000 check to George M. Walisb, so that the Carpenters 
of Pennsylvania, Inc. could get started in the home-building field. 




Four members of Local 1358 carry the 
main dish to the picnic grounds. 

Members and their families of Local 
1358, La Jolla, Calif, recently enjoyed 
free roast-pig picnic; plus hot dogs, ham- 
burgers, games and prizes for the chil- 
dren. 

Earlier last year, at its awards ban- 
quet, Local 1358 presented Brotherhood 
wrist watches to 23 graduating appren- 
tices as well as 25-year pins to 23 mem- 
bers. 



Local 821 Members Meet Congressman 

Several members of Local 821, Springfield, N..I., gathered recently at the home of 
their Spanish-speaking representative, Fred Jimenez, iji Hillside, N.J. Neighbors and 
friends came in to meet the incumbent candidate for Congress, Joseph Minish, 11th 
District, New Jersey, who was victorious in the last general elections. 

Shown in the group are: Seated from left, Peter Pedicini, executive board member 
Local 821; and Daify and Fred Jimenez, Local 821 representative. Standing: Stan 
Ruzcyhi, union carpenter; Congressman Joseph Mijiish and Leo Isherwood, bus. rep., 
Essex County District Council. 



FEBRUARY, 1973 



31 



[■Lj Aluminum Box Mfg. 

Cusick, Wash. 99119 U.S.A. Phone (509) 445-2541 

Portable Tool Box for Carpenters 

This carpenter tool box is for the man who cares about his tools. 




Pat. No. 3549064 



Belts on Box for Climbing 



The tool box is made from 0.63 heavy gauge aluminum. The 
corners are heliarc welded for strength. It has double latches which 
can be padlocked and heavy duty fiberglass handle. 

It is designed for all carpenters. It holds a complete line of any 
major brand of hand tools. This tool box can be carried anywhere 
like a suitcase with tools staying in place. The back pack feature is 
for men working in high places, enabling them to use both hands 
for climbing. It is very compact and easy to use. 

Thjs box will give you years of service. All tools can be seen at a 
glance and easily removed, saving on tool losses. It is 14 in. wide, 
34 in. long and 4 in. thick. 

List of Tools This Box will Hold 



2 Hand Saws 

1 Hammer 

1 25, 50 or 100 ft. Tape 

1 6 to 16 ft. Tape 

1 Wood Rule 

1 Keyhole Saw 

1 Comb. Square 

Pencils 

Nail Punches 
1 Chalk Box 

1 6 or 7 in. Block Plane 
1 Plumb Bob 

Chisels 
1 24 or 28 in. Level 
1 2 ft. Framing Square 

All spaces for tools are clearly labeled. 



1 Sweep Brace 

Chalk Line 
1 10 or 12 in. Crescent Wrench 
1 Hatchet 
1 Side Cutter 
1 Vise Grip 
1 18 in. Pry Bar 
1 Noil Claw 
1 24 in. Extension Bit 
1 Expansion Bit 
13 Wood Bits. 1 in. to Va in. 
1 Bevel Square 
Screw Drivers 
1 Small Tin Snip 



r" 



Tool Box without Tools $38.50 □ 

1 Set Back Pack Belts 3.50 D 

Postage & handling 3.50 D 

Washington State residents add 5% sales tax O 

Total for order Q 

[71 I enclose amount in full. Date • 

I I Charge my account No 

□ BankAmericard □ Mastercharge 



Name. 



I 
I 

I Address. 

I 



City. 



State Zip Code . 



Unconditional 10-day money back guarantee. Guarantee for 1 year. 
Tool Box only. All orders shipped within 2 weeks parcel post. 
Mokes an excellent gift for Holidays & Special Occasions. Prices 
subject to change without notice. 



Local Chartered 
At Margate, Florida 

The charter of Local 1259, Margate, Fla., was installed by 
Representative J. E. Sheppard on December 5, 1972. 

He appointed temporary officers to serve until a formal elec- 
tion can be arranged. 

At the charter meeting, Sheppard explained the origin of the 
United Brotherhood and other unions. He explained to those 
present the benefits the United Brotherhood provided for the 
membership. 

He also advised those present that they are now a part of 
the Broward County Carpenters District Council and the Flor- 
ida State Council of Carpenters. 

Temporary officers named include: Joseph C. Witte, presi- 
dent; Arthur Steinweg, vice president; Michael Wilson, record- 
ing secretary; Lawrence McNeal, treasurer; Stephen Ball, con- 
ductor; Leroy Clemmons, warden; George Forester, trustee; 
and David Wallace, trustee. 




In the picture above, Florida State Organizer Warren Conary 
explains Brotherhood benefits to charter members of Local 
1259, as General Representative J. E. Sheppard assists in the 
presentation. Below, eight charter members of the Margate 
local union display their charter. 




NATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE 

Continued from page 12 

methods of social insurance to finance some kind of "across- 
the-board" medical care — National Health Insurance. 

"National Health Insurance would be universal and compre- 
hensive for all U.S. citizens regardless of race, religion or 
social status, provide cost and quality controls and built-in 
features for improving and expanding the health care delivery 
system, be equitably financed and fully prepaid, and maintain 
freedoms for both doctors and patients, he said. (PAI) 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



Officers of Montclair, N.J., Local Union 




The oflficcrs of Local 429, Montclair, N.J., assembled durin<; recent service-pin 
ceremonies for a picture. The group included: Front row. from left, Jim Moorman, 
member; .John Ward, recordijij; secretary; Joseph Camarista, delegate to pension 
welfare; Donald Swanson, trustee; Alex Swanson, president; Allen Ashley, Sr., 
trustee; and Allen Ashley, Jr., financial secretary. Second row, from left, an un- 
identified member; Edward Oleksaik, delegate to the district council; Chester Oleksaik. 
trustee; Dominick Donadio, delegate to the district council; William Rudinski, warden; 
John Crowley, conductor; and Sam Onello, treasurer. 

Officers of Local 1473, Oakland, Calif. 





The officers of Local 1473, Oakland, Calif., recently assembled for a group picture. 
They Include: Front row, from left, L. W. McDowell, treasurer; James Bamford, 
trustee; William V. Sanger, recording secretary; and Harry Strand, truslee; second 
row, William Marshall, business agent; Ralph Blair, vice president; Manuel Martinez, 
conductor; Jack Kirkman, financial secretary; Peter Schantz. warden; and Jack 
Myersy, president. 



Labor School Grads 

Two members of tlic Brotherhood 
were recently presented certificates for 
completion of their studies at the 21st 
Advanced Southern Labor School, held 
in Nashville, Tcnn., November 12-17. 
Participating in the one-week institute 
were Ronald Angell of Austin, Tex., and 
Sylvester Hicks, Jr., of Jackson, Miss. 

Barney Weeks, right, president of the 
Alabama Labor Council, presents certifi- 
cates to Southern Labor School students. 
Brotherhood Member Ronald Angell 
stands at left. 




>Nho e\se 
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to be a 



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FEBRUARY, 1973 



33 



SERVING THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY'S NEED 
FOR INFORMATION SINCE 1950. . . 



LABORaDlMATERIAL COSTS 



ESniMTDR k 



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DWOOD FRAME HOUSE CONSTRUCTION $2.25 

D CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY PRODUCTION MANUAL. $6.00 

D PRACTICAL RAFTER CALCULATOR $3.00 

DE-Z SQUARE $6.95 

D PRACTICAL LUMBER COMPUTER $2.00 

Your Name 

Address 

City State Zip 







^225 



223 Pages 

1 70 Big, Easy to understand Illustrations. 
Every step of construction covered. 

HUNDREDS Of VALUABLE TIPS 
(Modern — Practical Information on 
Building and Remodeling Residences. 



WtACTTCAL 
■ttTTED 



CORRECT 

RAFTER 

LENGTHS 

FOR 

EVERY 

SPAN 

AND RISE 



124 Pages 
3y2x7V2-$3.00 

The exact length for every common 
hip, valley and jack rafter. Every 
thing worked out to give you the 
correct rafter length to the nearest 
1 16". Every framing professional 
needs this time saver. 



COMPLETE BOARD FOOT 

TABLES 

AT YOUR FINGER TIPS 




124 Pages 

5Vzx8V2 



The board footage for all standard 
sizes and lengths of lumber from 1 
to 1000 pieces. The precise answer 
in seconds. 



64 PAGE 
BUILDING 
BOOK 
CATALOG 

WITH EVERY 
ORDER! 



L 



Total amount enclosed 

In California add 5% tai^ 
ALL SALES ON A 10 DAY 
FULL MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 



White Collar IVlove 
In California 

The California State Council of Car- 
penters has kicked off a drive to organize 
architectural and engineering staff em- 
ployees in its state by filing unfair labor 
practice charges with the National Labor 
Relations Board against a San Francisco 
architectural firm. 

Alleging that the firm of Hertzka & 
Knowles had threatened to blacklist and 
fire union employees, the Organization of 
Architectural & Engineering Employees, 
a Carpenter affiliate, asked the NLRB to 
set aside the results of a labor board elec- 
tion held December 6. In that election, 
by a vote of 14 to 11. the union was 
decertified as the bargaining agent. 

Prior to the election, the San Francisco 
Building Trades Council had voted ap- 
proval of strike sanction against the firm. 

The Carpenters Union decision to em- 
bark on a campaign to organize profes- 
sional employees connected with the con- 
struction industry represents a new de- 
parture from the traditional activities of 
the organization. 

The drive is being conducted under 
the auspices of the California State Coun- 
cil of Carpenters, AFL-CIO. and will be 
extended to Los Angeles and other urban 
centers, according to Anthony L. Ramos, 
state executive officer for the union. 

"There is, and should be, a natural 
alliance between the people who design 
and supervise construction and the people 
who build the building." Ramos said. "It 
is ridiculous that carpenters are earning 
nearly 50 percent more an hour than peo- 
ple with seven and more years of training 
working in architectural and engineering 
offices employing up to hundreds of em- 
ployees. The Organization of Architec- 
tural Employees, by affiliating with us, 
has asked for our assistance and we have 
committed ourselves to provide it." 

Testimonial Honors 
King of Local 1483 




More than half a century of faithful 
service as financial secretary of Local 
1483, Patchogue, N.Y., was acknowl- 
edged at a dinner-dance, November 10 
honoring Edwin L. King. King second 
from left, was congratulated by John 
Rogers, assistant to General President 
Sidell, while George Babcock, left, sec- 
retary-treasurer and general agent, Suf- 
folk County District Council, and Joe 
Tracz, right, look on. 



34 



THE CARPENTER 




DICTIONARY 



This is the 16th of a new feature series planned to keep you better 
informed on the meaning of terms related to collective bargainingf 
union contracts, and union business. Follow it closely, and your union 
membership will become more meaningful, and your ability to partici' 
pate in decisions which affect your future and security will be strength' 
ened. It was complied by the International Labor Press Assn,, and is 
used with permission. 



Sherman Antitrust Act — Passed in 1 890 to prevent business monop- 
oly. Courts misinterpreted the law and applied it against strikes. 
Unions were then fined triple damages for acts which were con- 
sidered in restraint of trade. 

shift: The stated working period for a group of employees, e.g., 
7 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

sliift differential: Added pay for second shift or third shift. 

shop committee: A group of union members named to handle griev- 
ances, negotiations and other management-union problems. 

shop steward: A union official who represents a specific group of 
members and the union in grievance matters and other employ- 
ment conditions. Sometimes called a committeeman. Stewards are 
usually part of the work force they represent. 

sick leave: Contractually-provided conditions under which employees 
are paid during illness. 

sit-down strike: A work stoppage in which employees report for 
work but remain idle at their job. This tactic was employed during 
the organizing surge of 1937-38 but was soon dropped. It is now 
explicitly forbidden by law. 

slowdown: Lessening of work effort by concerted agreement among 
employees, to force management concessions. This is sometimes 
used as an alternative to a strike. 

Smith-Hughes Act — A 1917 law providing basic vocational educa- 
tion, with federal grants to encourage the training of skills in 
agriculture, trade and industry. 

Social Security Act: National social insurance program, passed in 
1935, providing old-age and survivors benefits; public assistance 
to aged and blind and needy children; unemployment insurance, 
and disability benefits. 

speed-up: Management-directed system of increasing production 
without increase in pay. 

spendable earnings: Net earnings after deductions for taxes, etc., 
roughly parallel to take-home pay. 

split shift: Division of an employee's daily working time into two 
or more working periods, to meet peak needs, e.g., bus drivers in 
transportation rush hours. 

step-up: An automatic wage increase based on length of service. 

stock options: An arrangement whereby top management executives 
are rewarded, on top of salary, by option to buy certain amount 
of stock, usually much under market price. 

stock purchase plan: Company plan for purchase of stock by em- 
ployees, with or without employer contributions, at terms usually 
below market price. 




3 easy ^^ay5 to 
bore holes faster 

1. Irwin Speedbor "88" for oil elecfric drills. 
Bores faster in any wood at any angle. Sizes V4" 
to '/,6", S.98 each. %" to Vb" . $1.10 each. ""Ke" 
to 1", $1.15 each. 1 Ye" to 1 Vj", $1.70 each. 

2. Irwin No. 22 Micro-Dial expansive bit. Fits 
all hand braces. Bores 35 standard holes, Va" to 
3". Only $6.30. No. 21 small size bores 19 
standard holes, Ve" to IVi". Only $5.60. 

3. Irwin 62T Solid Center hand broce type. 
Gives double-cutter boring action. Only 16 turns 
to bore 1" holes through 1" wood. Sizes V4" to 
I'A". V4" size only $1.75. 

EVERY IRWIN BIT made of high analysis 
steel, heat tempered, machine-sharpened 
and highly polished, too. Buy from your 
independent hardware, building supply or 
lumber dealer. 

Strait-Line Chalk Line Reel Box 
only $1.50 for 50 ft. size 
fievf and improved Irv/in self-chalking desrgn. 
Precision mode of aluminum alloy. Practically 
damage-proof. Fits the pocket, fits y— . 

the hond. 50 ft. and 100 ft. sizes. Get y^r^*^ 

Strait-Line Micro-Fine chalk refills and / f^\ 

Tite-Snop replacement lines, too. Get ' * ^ 
a perfect chalk line every time. . ', 




Wilmington, 

Ohio 45177 ._^ 

every bit as good as the name 



LAYOUT LEVEL 

•ACCURATE TO 1/32" 

^REACHES 100 FT. 

eONE-MAN OPERATION 

Save Time, Money, do o Better Job 
With This Modern Water tevel 

In just a few minutes you accurately set batters 
for slabs and footings, lay out inside floors, 
ceilings, forms, iixtui'es, and check foundations 
for remodeling. 

HYDROLEVEL® 

... the old reliable water 
level with modern features. Toolbox size. 
Durable 7" container with exclusive reser- 
voir, keeps level filled and ready. 50 ft. 
clear tough 3/10" tube gives you 100 ft. of 
leveling in each set-up. with 
1/32" accuracy and fast one- 
man operation — outside, in- 
side, around corners, over 
obstructions. Anywhere you 
can climb or crawl! 

Why waste money on delicate Hjfi*'^ 
instruments, or lose time and ac- 
curacy on makeshift leveling? Since 19 
thousands of carpentei-s, builders, inside trades, 
etc. have found that HYDROLEVEL pays for 
itself quickly. 

Send chock or money order for §14.95 and 
your name and address. We will rush you a 
Hydrolevel by return mail postpaid. Or — buy 
three Hydrolcvcis at $9.95 each, postpaid. Sell 
two for $14.95 each and have yours free! No 
C.O.D. Satisfaction guaranteed or money back. 

FIRST IN WATER tEVEL DESIGN SINCE 1950 

DESOTO TOOL COMPANY 

P.O. Box G Ocean Springs, Miss. 39564 




FEBRUARY, 1973 



35 







L.U. NO. 7 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Aronson, Swan 
Hodgdon, John 
Johnson, Laverne 
Rusdahl, Herbert C. 

L.U. NO. 11 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Cronk, Loren P. 
Manzo, Joseph 
Marshall, George 
Talhon, August 

L.U. NO. 19 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Allard, George J. 
Brooks, Ben 
Bruner, Mason E. 
Crocker, Clarence 
Crow, Julius 
Dick, Charles 
Eusebi, Albert 
Faulk. Nix 
Franks, Michael E. 
Giles, William B. 
Girts, Harry A. 
Griffin, George 
Hoag, Richard L. 
Kavan, Frank 
Martin, William E. 
Murray, Clyde F. 
Norris, Howard 
Regnier, Louis J. 
Smith. J. B. 
Van Summer, Kenneth 
Wallen, Ben 
Woody, Robert E. 

L.U. NO. 33 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Amos, Floyd 
Brooks, Martin 
Gates. Charles 
Goldstein, Charles 
Lezents, Frank 
Lilly, Joseph 
Mott, James P. 
Roach, Frank 
Shea, Harold 
Taylor, Willie 
Williamson, Robert 
Zeuli, Patrick 

L.U. NO. 36 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Angella, Julius 
Clayson, John C. 
Magers, L. D. 
Mattson, Norman R. 
Minkin, Abe 
Reynolds, William 
Spanjersberg, Jack 
Swanson, A. M. 
Warn, Samuel A. 

L.U. NO. 47 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Brooks, Dan 
Cash, Paul 
Climer, Jerrel 
Geistdorfer, Gail 
Hackman, Lester 
Heiman, Joseph 
Reinhardt, George 
Rewald, Francis 
Rupp, WilUam H. 



Shryock, Harold 
Street, Charles A. 
Wagner, John A. 
Watson, William A. 

L.U. NO. 51 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Cabral, Joseph 
LaRosa, Paul 
Pacheco, Manuel 

L.U. NO. 53 

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. 

Maio. Frank 

L.U. NO. 55 
DENVER, COLO. 

Bayler, Fred S. 
Brooks, Dallas J. 
Metzger, Dan 
Pettit, Eugene H. 

L.U. NO. 61 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Cleveland, James E. 
Frazier, Myron 
Glenn, Ralph M. 
Johnson, Forrest D. 
Miller, Lester A. 
Poindexter, Samuel C. 
Vaughn, Grover C. 

L.U. NO. 64 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 

Gentry, A. P. 
Hartle, M. 
Hunsinger, C. 
Lloyd, Mitchell 
Mattingly, George 
Steen, John 
Tyler, Gwynn 

L.U. NO. 71 

FORT SMITH, ARK. 

Basham, George C. 
Watson, Charles C. 

L.U. NO. 72 
ROCHESTER, N.Y. 

Doran, John 
Frohm, Edward 
Onderecsko, George 
Pusateri, Cosimo 
Scheil, Albert 
Schmitt, Cornelius 
Schreiber, Richard 

L.U. NO. 90 
EVANSVILLE, IND. 

Baker, William R., Sr. 
Nash, John 

L.U. NO. 101 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Pitzer, Roy L. 

L.U. NO. 106 

DES MOINES, IOWA 

Alcox, Purl 
Bain, David 
Ball, Gregory 
Bechtel, Virgil 
Clay, Archie 
Cushman. Roy 
Enquist, John 
Fretty, Ole 



Gray, Gale 
Hines, Robert 
Knipp, Larry 
Larson, Fred 
Madsen, Bernard 
Meharry, Robert 
Mellin, Rick 
Nixon, R. V. 
Osborne, Richard 
Schamp. R. L. 
Stady, Earnest 

L.U. NO. 119 
NEWARK, N.J. 

Bauer, John 
Matoska, Chester 

L.U. NO. 132 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Kent, Robert B. 
Miller, Raymond O. 
Mulholland, John J. 
White, Thomas T. 

L.U. NO. 133 

TERRE HAUTE, IND. 

Duby, George L. 
Goble, Walter B. 
Myers, Charles E. 

L.U. NO. 134 
MONTREAL, QUE. 

Meunier, Charles 

L.U. NO. 169 

EAST ST. LOUIS, ILL. 

Skrabacz, John 

L.U. NO. 181 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Henrickson, Jorgen 
Johansen, Edwin 
Nedoba, George J. 
Peterson, Ancher Adolph 

L.U. NO. 200 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Ames, Russell 
Blose, Ned 
Owings, Harley 
Phelps, Leon 

L.U. NO. 226 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Allen, Andrew B. 
Weathers, Bruce 

L.U. NO. 246 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Fassler, Aaron 

L.U. NO. 249 
KINGSTON, ONT. 

Potts, Joseph C. 

L.U. NO. 253 
OMAHA, NEBR. 

Hoist, Carl P. 
Honcik, Walter, Sr. 
Hunter, Raymond E. 
Kripal, Jake V. 
Petersen, John. Jr. 
Swetala, Matthew 

L.U. NO. 257 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Jacoby, Paul 



Matheson, Hector 
Nouwt, Martin 

L.U. NO. 283 
AUGUSTA, GA. 

Green, Ray C. 
Meeks, Joseph Henry 
Redd, Isadore H. 
Stephens, Paul F. 
Stewart, Homer H. 
Wheehs, C. V. 

L.U. NO 287 
HARRISBURG, PA. 

Lester, Thomas L., Sr. 

L.U. NO. 329 
OKLAHOMA CITY, 
OKLA. 

Adkins, D. F. 
Beitz, Elmer W. 
Blake, Sam 
Butler, Lawrence 
Campbell, A. J. 
Casey. B. F. 
Dyer, Lawrence 
Fisher, Robert R. 
Forrester, Arthur L. 
Godwin, Edward 
Leath, William O. 
McLeod, Kenneth 
Nagel, Paul 
Reagan, Alva 
Sleeper, Alva Earl 
Snelgro, C. C. 
Sorrels, A. E. 
Turner, Edward 
Wilson, Bruce J. 
Whitten, I. T. 

L.U. NO. 335 
GRAND RAPIDS, 
MICH. 

Dawson, Walter 
Schultz, Lawrence 
Squires, Claude 

L.U. NO. 366 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Farr, Robert 
Johnson, Manfred 

L.U. NO. 373 

FT. MADISON, IOWA 

Pannenberg, Joe 

L.U. NO. 384 
ASHEVILLE, N.C. 

Setzer, H. E. 

L.U. NO. 403 
ALEXANDRIA, LA. 

Fuglaar, Norman 
Singer, Edward 

L.U. NO. 411 

SAN ANGELO, TEX. 

Dunn, John S. 

L.U. NO. 417 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Aberle, Ralph 
Aussieker, Marion 
Baerveldt, Harry L. 
Baerveldt, Louis 
Brewster, Roy R. 
Gittemeier, David F. 
Johnston, Aubrey J. 



Kircher, George 
Scheffing, John W. 
Stanfield, Edgar L. 

L.U. NO. 440 
BUFFALO, N.Y. 

Klewe. Frank 
Schifferle, Albert, Sr. 
Schultz, John 

L.U. NO. 507 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 

Green, John M. 

L.U. NO. 512 

ANN ARBOR, MICH. 

Haynes, Garnet 
Schneider, Carl 
Smeltzer, Chester 

L.U. NO. 558 
ELMHURST, ILL. 

Bracker, Paul 
Dederick, Leslie 
Zarbock, Gustave A. 

L.U. NO. 562 
EVERETT, WASH. 

Williams, Vern 

L.U. NO. 583 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Peik, Elmer C. 
Riepl, John 

L.U. NO. 626 
WILMINGTON, DEL. 

Brittingham, Milton W. 
Buckingham, Richard L. 
DeBonis. Carl 
Farrell, George B. 
Forrest, James M. 
Fuimara, James J. 
Galasso, Vito A. 
Higgins, Joseph F. 
Lane, James C. 
McDermott, James H. 
Medders, William H. 
Millar, Fred 
Spencer, John T. 
Turner, Wilson S. 

L.U. NO. 668 

PALO ALTO, CALIF. 

Leahy, Clarence P. 

L.U. NO. 701 
FRESNO, CALIF. 

Beecham, Ed 
Bingham, Howard C. 
Blasco, Stephen 
Bush. Thomas, Sr. 
Campbell, Robert O. 
Farnsworth, Ray 
Gainer, James F. 
Hausladen, Joseph 
Hickmond, OrviUe 
Hughes, O. S. 
Jensen, Peter C. 
Jones. Lawrence A. 
Jones, Tillman E. 
Johnson, William E. 
McElbannon, John B. 
Martz, William N. 
May, Claude H. 
Oberg, Harry F. 
Papazian, Paul 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



Reeves, George W. 
Rundstrom, C. T. 
Selby, Asa A. 
Serrato, Fermin G. 
Sparks, Ewell L. 
Speights, Carl C. 
Watson, Lester L. 
Webster, Henry L. 
Williams, John N. 
Ybarra, Charles W. 
Zing, Lester 

L.U. NO. 745 
HONOLULU, HAWAII 

Shigemura, Yoshito 
Yamada, Tadao 
Wischmann, David, Jr. 

L.U. NO. 787 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Johnsen, Eric 

L.U. NO. 808 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Crooke, Robert 
Doepp, George 
Frank, Charles F. 
Frank, Max 
Ford, Harvey 
Kohlhepp, John 
Martin, Camillo 
Maurer, Frank 
Olson, Otto M. 
Romano, Luigi 
Rung, P. 
Sibbert, Henry 

L.U. NO. 940 
SANDUSKY, OHIO 

Brandt, Alfred 



Rcinheimer, Louis J. 
Continued, next page 

L.U. NO. 948 
SIOUX CITY, IOWA 

Krom, Edward 

L.U. NO. 982 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Bartkowiak. Andrew 
Burle. Frank 
Steinkemper, John 

L.U. NO. 1074 
EAU CLAIRE, WIS. 

Belter, Gustave 
Gilgan, Fred 
Larson, Albert 
Shermo, Otis 
Suckow, Edward 

L.U. NO. 1114 
SOUTH MILWAUKEE, 
WIS. 

Kratt. Jacob 
Nelson, Carl 
Olsen, Cyril 
Robinson, Harlie 
Schneider, Goar 

L.U. NO. 1128 
LA GRANGE, ILL. 

Gustafson, Edwin 
Ziszik, Andrew 

L.U. NO. 1138 
TOLEDO. OHIO 

Bagley, Frank 
Hildinger, Robert 



Rober, Norman 
Rohrs, Henry 

L.U. NO. 1149 
SAN FRANCISCO, 
CALIF. 

Clements, V. W. 
Fine, David 
Hankins, Jack 
Linville, Perlo 
Loveen, H. A. 
Shepherd, Jack 
Sifford, Jerry 
Stephen, Ealey 
Testa, Charles 

L.U. NO. 1367 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Iversen, Ernest 
Kastleman, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 1394 
FT. LAUDERDALE, 
FLA. 

Kinnick, George 
L'Heureux, Claude 
Wilson, Earl 

L.U. NO. 1407 
WILMINGTON, CALIF. 

Adolphson, Folkc 
Beason, William 
Burgess, Harry W. 
McDonough, John 
Orozco, Santos 

L.U. NO. 1456 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Bentsen, Bjarne 



Berg, Melkior 
Dziadyk, John 
Eklund, Eric 
Hagstrom, John 
Murphy, Richard 
Neilsen, Lawrence 
Olsen, Fred 
Olsen, Tollef 
Sangesland, Erling 
Scadulo, Benny 
Scherman, Anders 

L.U. NO. 1518 
GULFPORT, MISS. 

Carroll, Oliver H. 

L.U. NO. 1599 
REDDING, CALIF. 

Leach, Fred, Sr. 
Neil, C. C. 

L.U. NO. 1635 
KANSAS CFTY, MO, 

Muder, William P. 

L.U. NO. 1708 
AUBURN, WASH. 

Connolly, John D. 
Gruder, Raymond 
Howard, Alfred E. 
Morgan, James 
Wilson. Lemuel 

L.U. NO. 1725 
DAYTON A BEACH, 
FLA. 

Kuhn, William 
Larsson, Knute 
Munsey, E. E. 



Owens, Robert 
Russell, Charles 
Shrapnell, John 
Tarr, Wilbur 

L.U. NO. 1805 
SASKATOON, SASK. 

Paproski, Leo 

L.U. NO. 1974 
ELLENSBURG, WASH. 

Patteson, John U. 

L.U. NO. 2073 
MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

Andersen, Burton 
Benning, Ralph 
DeWar, John 
Edwardsen, Albert 
Karsten, John K. 
Kendall, Ralph 
Knudson, Chris 
Michalak, Anthony 
Patzer, Charles 
Simonsen, Simon 

L.U. NO. 2471 
PENSACOLA, FLA. 

Miller, Morris B. 

L.U. NO. 2523 
MEMPHIS, TENN. 

Smith, John 

L.U. NO. 3127 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Licitra, Giovanni (John) 
Renda, Frank 






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FEBRUARY, 1973 



37 



QUALITY TOOLS THAT OUT-LAST THEM ALL 



Estwing 
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BELSAW POWER TOOLS 

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38 



THE CARPENTER 



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BLIND-HOLE ANCHOR 

A new "blind hole" or "'thru"' type 
anchor, developed by Precision Plastics, 
Inc., of Largo, Fla., provides a solid 
fastening for any type of wall or floor 
capable of supporting more than 100 
pounds. 

According to William LeMaster, gen- 
eral manager of Precision Plastics, pro- 
duction began early this year on the new 
"Sleev-Lok" anchors. The assembled 
anchor consists of a steel screw, a nylon 
sleeve and a polycarbonate, threaded 
cone. 

"Nylon grips better than steel," Le- 
Master said, "actually flowing into porous 
block or concrete. The split cone nut 
locks the screw in place, even when the 
screw is removed many times." 

The anchor comes in two sizes, 
V4"xl!4" and 1/4" xlVi". Only a 
masonry drill and a screwdriver are re- 
quired for installation. The assembled 
anchor is tapped into the drilled hole 
and locked by tightening the screw. Once 
installed, it will never loosen or twist. 

The "Sleev-Lok" anchors are patented, 
and other patents are pending. Tests by 
Pittsburgh Testing Laboratories are on 
file. The anchors were invented by Har- 
land McVittie, former owner and presi- 
dent of Spotkey Color Control Systems 
of Clarement, N.H., who is now a partner 
in Precision Plastics, Inc. 

Free samples and additional informa- 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 


Aluminum Box Mfg 


32 


Audel, Theodore 


39 


Belsaw Institute . 


33 


Belsaw Power Tools 


38 


BeLsaw Sharp-All Co 


11 


Chicago Technical College . . 


13 


Craftsman Book Company . . 


34 


DeSoto Tool Company 


35 


Eliason Stair Gauge Co 


33 


Estwing Manufacturing 


38 


Foley Manufacturing 


29 


Irwin Auger Bit Co 


35 


Locksniithing Institute 


15 


No. Amer. School of Drafting 


37 


No. Amer. School of Surveying 


39 


Stanley Power Tools Back Cover | 


Vaughan & Bushnell 


14 







When the screw is tightened, the split 
cone nut expands the nylon sleeve, lock- 
ing the anchor in place. 



•^ 




\ 



The assembled anchor consists of a 
steel screw, a nylon sleeve and a threaded 
cone. Also shown is a wall bracket. 



tion are available by writing to Precision 
Plastics, Inc., 1500 East Bay Drive. 
Largo, Fla. 33540. 

PATIO DOOR PACKAGE 

A literature package that includes a 
colorful brochure entitled "Patio Doors" 
and a four-page "Installation Guide" 
complete with detailed specifications and 
product information is offered by Geor- 
gia-Pacific Corp. 

Installation instructions and detailed 
illustrations include: preparing the rough/ 
masonry opening to accommodate either 
a 2-panel or 3-paneI reversible patio door, 
assembling the door parts, positioning 
fixed and sliding panels, and adjusting 
the meeting rails, sills and jamb sides to 
fit on-site installation. 

To complement the 2-panel and 3-panel 
door models available in 6, 8, 9 and 12- 
foot opening sizes, the wood or aluminum 
patio door units are shipped complete 
with a hardware package and weather- 
stripped screens with adjustable nylon 
rollers, top and bottom. Each model 
comes in %-inch tempered insulated 
glass. 

Patio door literature package is avail- 
able by contacting a local G-P repre- 
sentative or G. S. Nelson, Georgia-Pacific 
Corp., 900 S. W. Fifth Ave., Portland. 
Ore. 97204. 



Women in Work Force 

Continued from page 6 

Things are not as bad as they were in 
ancient Rome, however, she says. One 
woman mathematician in the days of the 
Caesars was stoned to death because she 
was able to teach algebra to males. 



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39 



IN CONCLUSION 



Denying Welfare 

to Needy Strikers 

Defies All 

Principles of 

Fairness 

IN THE LONG RUN, 

INCREASES GAINED BY 

STRIKERS HELP FINANCE 

AID TO LESS FORTUNATE 



■ Does the family of a man in prison rate more 
consideration than the family of a man on strike? 
This is not merely an academic question. A fed- 
eral regulation that would allow states to deny 
welfare to needy families of strikers is under con- 
sideration by the Department of Health, Educa- 
tion and Welfare. 

The injustice of such a regulation hardly needs 
elaboration. A man on strike is a taxpayer tempo- 
rarily placed in financial straits by his efforts to 
improve the lot of his family and his craft. He will 
resume paying taxes once the strike is settled, 
and the amount of taxes he pays will be increased 
in proportion to the additional wages won through 
strike action. 



Basic to the whole question, however, is the 
axiom that need and need alone should govern 
eUgibility for welfare. Any departure from this 
principle is unacceptable in an enhghtened social 
order. 

To argue (as some reactionaries do) that grant- 
ing welfare to needy families of strikers would pro- 
long strikes is patently false. Welfare benefits are 
no substitute for union wages, and it is only union 
members who go out on strike. 

The whole question of welfare reform is high on 
the Congressional agenda. 

Every effort aimed at welfare reform during 
recent years fell fiat on its face. The omnibus bill 
passed by the U.S. House of Representatives last 
year, under the title of H.R.-l. was doomed to fail- 
ure when the Senate failed to act. 

THE SHEER COMPLEXITY of the welfare 
situation makes it extremely difficult to develop a 
viable and meaningful welfare reform package. 

Recently, Henry J. Aaron, a Senior Fellow of 
the Brookings Institution, published a short book- 
let entitled. Why Is Welfare So Hard to Reform? 
In his study, Mr. Aaron points out that in many 
instances current welfare procedures are encour- 
aging recipients to stay on welfare, or at least 
they are not encouraging recipients to hunt for 
jobs. Point by point, Mr. Aaron indicates how the 
current system exerts subtle pressures upon welfare 
recipients to maintain the status quo. 

In part, the Aaron study points up: 

• Most states allow recipients of cash assistance 
to keep only one-third of earnings over $360 — 
a kind of tax rate of 66-2/3 percent. Thus a recipi- 
ent who works a week at the 1972 minimum wage 
keeps not the $64 earned but only $21.33 ($64 
less a reduction in welfare payments of $42.67) 
plus certain work-related expenses. 

• Occupants of federally assisted housing must 
pay more for their housing as their income, includ- 
ing public assistance, rises. This seems fair enough 
at first glance; but, like the decline in welfare pay- 
ments, it is a form of tax on new disposable in- 
come. Low-rent public housing tenants face an 
additional hazard; a small increase in earnings can 
lead to a complete loss of benefits, since in some 
cases they must move out if their income reaches 
a certain level. 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



• Eligibilty for Medicaid is determined on an 
all-or-nothing basis in states without a program for 
the medically indigent. If a family's income is low 
enough and it meets other criteria, it receives free 
medical care; if its income rises $1 above the eligi- 
bility threshold, it loses all benefits. According to 
Aaron, "For a family with income near the eligi- 
bility threshold and with large medical bills, this 
'notch' can turn a rise in hourly earnings into 
financial disaster, and it can make a decision to 
work longer hours a kind of financial suicide." 

• For most welfare families the cost of food 
stamps rises about $3 for every $10 increase in 
net income — a 30 percent implicit tax. Regardless 
of income, welfare recipients remain eligible to buy 
food stamps with a bonus value of at least $288 
a year. This feature worsens the notch effect — 
the sudden loss of benefits — when eligibility for 
welfare is lost. 

Under the shortcomings pointed out by the 
Aaron study, welfare costs can only continue 
mounting. 

Mr. Aaron argues that incentives ought to be 
developed so that welfare recipients who make an 
effort to help themselves could improve their lives 
by retaining a more reasonable percentage of their 
earnings. 

Above all, there should be some serious consid- 
eration given to making use of sliding scales of 
assistance rather than maintaining rigid maxi- 
mums, which tend to discourage welfare recipients 
from seeking income from work. 

For example: If a recipient of welfare is just 
below the cutoff point necessary to make him eli- 
gible for Medicaid, it would be uneconomical for 
him to earn a few more dollars which would put 
him above the cutoff figure and. thus, make him 
ineligible for Medicaid. 

THE SAME HOLDS TRUE for subsidized 
housing, food stamps, etc. In such situations, a 
premium is actually put on not working. To expect 
humans to work when work would be a losing 
financial proposition is asking too much even on 
the lowest rung of the economic ladder. 

Certainly I am no expert in the field of welfare 
or social engineering, but it seems reasonable to 
me that there ought to be measurable rewards for 
working. 



While the problem of welfare reform may be 
a complicated one, it is not insoluble. I hope that 
the new governments in both the United States and 
Canada can address themselves effectively to the 
problems of helping the poor help themselves, 
which is the most effective and lastingly important 
kind of help. 

Certainly denying welfare to workers who are 
placed in need temporarily through strike action 
is not a contribution to welfare reform. Strikes are 
the ultimate weapon by which union workers raise 
their income to the point where they can not only 
provide decent living conditions for their own fam- 
ilies but also help, through tax dollars and commu- 
nity fund contributions, to provide for the families 
of those who have no work. ■ 




FEBRUARY, 1 973 




Model 76 
$68.40 



No chatter. No rough edges. Less blade breakage. 
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and V2" steel, aluminum, brass and other metals. 
An oversized fan directs its powerful air blast to- 
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P.S.: made by the same Stanley 



If that's not enough reason to buy a Stanley, con- 
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28560. helps you do things right 

that makes the finest hand tools. 



STANLEY 



The 



MARlCH 1^73 



iHL 




Official Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA • FOUNDED 1881 




The stormy March has come at last. 
With wind, and cloud, and changing skies; 
I hear the rushing of the blast. 
That through the snowy valley flies. 



-William Cullen Brvant 






GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Herbert C. Skinner 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

William Konyha 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D.C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 
Charles E. Nichols 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



Secretaries, Please Note 

If your local union wishes to list de- 
ceased members in the "In Memoriam" 
page of The Carpenter, it is necessary 
that a specific request be directed to the 
editor. 



In processing complaints, the only 
names which the financial secretary needs 
to send in are the names of members 
who are NOT receiving the magazine. 
In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. Members who die or are sus- 
pended are automatically dropped from 
the mailing list of The Carpenter. 



First District, Patrick J. Campbell 

130 North Main Street 

New City, Rockland Co., New York 

10956 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

1 30 Mountain Avenue 
Springfield, New Jersey 07081 

Third District, Anthony Ochocki 
18400 Grand River Avenue, 
Detroit, Michigan 48223 

Fourth District, Harold E. Lewis 
2970 Peachtree Rd., N.W., Suite 300 
Atlanta, Ga. 30305 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
2800 Selkirk Drive 
Burnsville, Minn. 55378 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bltll 
Glenbrook Center West — Suite 501 
1140 N.W. 63rd Street 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73116 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, M. B. Bryant 

Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 

Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 

2418 Central Avenue 

Windsor, Ontario, Canada 

Tenth District, Eldon T. Staley 

4706 W. Saanich Rd. 

RR #3, Victoria, B. C. 




William Sidell, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



„„... „ , „ _! am ■■ mm mi wm 3SS ssx wm mm mss ^m imt wmi i 

PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: FilUng out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine, which requires 
six to dght weelcs. However, this does not advise your own local union of 
your address change. You must notify your local union by some ofiier 
method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



8£ 



NAME. 



Local No. 

Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS. 



City 



State or Province 



ZIP Code 



THE 



(§/A\[S[?aH]^ 





VOLUME XCIII 



No. 3 



MARCH, 1973 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Editor 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

President, Labor Talk Trade Deficits 2 

New England Carpenters, and Management Create Jobs 5 

Safety Report 10 

Keep Your Cutting Tools Sharp 32 

Opponents of No-Fault Insurance Switch Tactics 36 

Wood Framing Could Ease Energy Crisis 39 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 4 

CLIC Report Charles Nichols 8 

Organizing James Parker 1 2 

Canadian Report Morden Lazarus 14 

Service to the Brotherhood 17 

Plane Gossip 25 

Local Union News 26 

We Congratulate 28 

Apprenticeship and Training 30 

Your Union Dictionary, No. 17 34 

What's New? 35 

In Memoriam 37 

In Conclusion William Sidell 40 



POSTMASTERS, ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER. Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E., Washington, D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20* in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

Harbingers of spring are every- 
where, or will be soon: changing skies 
and high winds, the advent of the an- 
nual kite-flying season, the surge of 
sap in sugar maples, the breakup of 
ice freezing over the river. 

"Spring has many American faces," 
the poet Archibald MacLeish once 
observed. "There are cities where it 
will come and go in a day and coun- 
ties where it hangs around and never 
quite gets there." 

Spring this year will arrive officially 
March 20 at exactly 1:13 p.m. EST. 
At that moment, named the vernal 
equinox, the sun seems balanced right 
over the equator. 

It stalks northward across the land 
at about an average of 15 miles a day. 

Across the country, spring starts 
"bustin' out all over" long before 
June. In early March the alkaline flats 
around Palm Springs, California, be- 
come fields of purple sand verbena, 
and wild lilac blooms in the Holly- 
wood hills. 

Dogwoods accent more than 800 
azalea varieties brightening up the 
South, Johnny-jump-ups speak of 
spring in the Pacific Northwest, 
cherry blossoms in Washington. D.C.. 
violets and fiddlehead ferns in New 
England, dandelions everywhere. 

NOTE: Readers who would like copies 
of this cover vumarred by a mailing label 
may oblain them by sending lOi in coin 
to cover mailing costs to the Editor, The 
CARPENTER, 101 Constitution Ave., 
N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001. 




\. 



iK.!lPK' 




Jobs and Devaluation 



PRESIDENT, LABOR 
TALK TRADE DEFICITS 




President Nixon as he discussed foreign 
trade and economic controls with the 
AFL-CIO Executive Council at Bal 
Harbour, Fla., last month, Secretarj- of 
Labor Peter Brennan is seated at far left 
and AFL-CIO President George Meanj- 
is at right. General President William 
Sidell participated in the discussions as 
a member of the Executive Council. 



By Alexander Uhl 

Press Associates, Inc. 

■ As the AFL-CIO Executive 
Council met last month and pressed 
for action against job losses, there 
were strong signs that the Nixon 
Administration is beginning to mod- 
ify its strict "free trade" policies. 

Stunning reverses in the 1971 
trade balance leading to the Ad- 
ministration's devaluation of the 
dollar by ten percent have been 
accompanied by Administration 
concessions that monetary policy 
is not enough to solve the foreign 
trade imbalance. Power to change 
tariff rates, if not quotas, may be 
necessary to meet the trade crisis. 

Highly significant of expected 
shifts in Administration policy was 
the private visit in council meeting 
rooms of Secretary of the Treasury 
George Shultz and Secretary of State 
William Rogers with AFL-CIO 
President George Meany, Secretary- 
Treasurer Lane Kirkland, Legisla- 
tive Director Andrew J. Biemiller 
and Research Director Nathaniel 
Goldfinger. 

Although details of the discus- 
sion were not revealed, the subject 
was Nixon trade policy and the 
kind of legislation that the Admin- 
istration is preparing to present to 
Congress. 

The talks came at a time when 
the AFL-CIO Maritime Trades De- 
partment, also meeting in Florida, 
urgently called for a measure to 
revise American foreign trade policy 
so as to protect American industry 
and jobs. 

The MTD Executive Board called 
for control of American multi-na- 
tionals which have been exporting 
American capital and technology in 
increasing amounts for private 
profit; an end to the export of U.S. 
oil refineries and legislation that 
would require a minimum of 50 
percent of imported oil to be car- 



THE CARPENTER 



ried on American flag vessels. 

In a report called "U.S. Multi- 
nationals: The Dimming of Amer- 
ica," the MTD declared that cur- 
rency speculations by gigantic mul- 
tinational corporations and banks 
was responsible for the recent 
weakening of the U.S. dollar on the 
world monetary market, leading to 
a ten percent devaluation by the 
Nixon Administration. 

The MTD report charges that 
while the U.S. economy has been 
declining despite some recent gains, 
American-based multinationals 
"have forged a business empire that 
rivals the gross national product 
of Japan with more than 78 billion 
dollars invested in overseas plants 
and equipment." 

"This great exodus of American 
production to overseas plants has 
led economists, labor leaders and 
even some far-sighted businessmen 
to wonder whether we are witness- 
ing the dimming of America," the 
report said. 

"It is a trade of American jobs 



for jobs in France, Australia, 
South Africa, any place in the 
world," said the report. "It is a 
trade of exports and a healthy bal- 
ance of trade surplus for imports 
and a balance of trade deficit. It is 
a trade of balance of payments 
deficit and a dollar that is still shaky 
despite devaluation. It is a trade of 
the skills and livelihood of Ameri- 
can workers for the stock dividends 
of a privileged few." 

In a series of resolutions the 
MTD board charged that while 
major American oil companies are 
planning no expansion of refining 
capacity in the U.S., they have "in- 
creased their foreign base refining 
capacity at the expense of our econ- 
omy and security." 

The board strongly urged the 
Congress to "immediately imple- 
ment a program designed to elimi- 
nate America's dependency on 
foreign sources for refined oil prod- 
ucts and to encourage growth of 
the U.S. refining capacity." 

In an analysis of the state of the 



American economy, the MTD 
board declared that while the year 
1972 showed a slight decrease in 
unemployment and in the inflation 
rate, the developments were "more 
than offset by booming corporate 
profits, inequitable wage controls, 
a deterioration in our balance of 
trade, and a growing monetary 
crisis." 

"The nation is truly at a cross- 
roads in 1973," the board said. 
"America can take control of its 
destiny — seize the initiative to pro- 
vide a good life for all Americans 
and secure freedom of action in 
the international arena. But to do 
this, bold new programs are 
needed." 

The MTD called for new policies 
to solve pressing social problems — 
hunger, disease, poverty, lack of 
social services and pollution, and 
concluded that the "long overdue 
tax reforms that close loopholes for 
corporations and the rich can pro- 
vide the money to deal with these 
problems." ■ 





VVhUe various AFL-CIO groups held their winter meetings in 
Florida, last month, Brotherhood representatives met jointly 
with representatives of the Plumbers and Pipe Fitters (upper 
left) and representatives of the Electrical Workers (upper 



right) to discuss jurisdictional matters among their unions. 

Meanwhile, the AFL-CIO Maritime Trades Department, 
(shown in session below) issued its report on multi-national 
corporations and foreign trade. 




MARCH, 1973 





ROUNDUP 



LABOR WELCOME FOR POWs-AFL-CIO Pres. George Meany has called on the federation's 
state and local central hodies to join with other community groups in welcoming 
home the U.S. prisoners of war being released in Southeast Asia. 

He cautioned central todies to show consideration in their welcome plans 
for the family situation and the physical and mental conditions of those 
returning. 

"Not to he forgotten," Meany urged, "is the family which may be notified, 
after years of waiting, that their hopes have been dashed." 

Meany expressed confidence that the state and local labor movements "will 
be able to demonstrate the sincere gratitude of the nation and citizenry in 
a generous and sympathetic manner." 

NLRB SOLICITOR-John C. Miller, 46, has been named solicitor of the National Labor 
Relations Board. He replaces Robert J. Wilson, who was appointed regional 
director of the NLRB's Minneapolis office. 

Miller recently had served as minority associate counsel for labor on the 
House Education & Labor Committee. He had previously served the NLRB on the 
general counsel's staff and as a supervisory attorney-advisor for Board Member 
Howard Jenkins, Jr. 

TRADE BILL VITAL— There is still time to save the nation's manufacturing industry 
from disaster if the flood of imports can be effectively regulated, Rep. James A. 
Burke (D-Mass.) declared at a recent Washington luncheon. 

The solution to the mounting trade deficit, Burke warned, would be found in 
the worn-out "free trade" policies of past decades. 

The trade agreements of the 1960s did not stem the erosion of American 
industries or properly compensate workers who lost their jobs as plants were . 
shut down, he said. 

1972 CONTRACT SETTLEMENTS— Wage increases in the first year of major union contracts 
signed in 1972 declined to an average of 7 percent, compared to the 11.6 percent 
average first-year rise posted in 1971, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported. 

BLS said wages over the life of the settlements increased an average of 
6.4 percent a year, down from an average of 8.1 percent rise of agreements 
in 1971. 

Construction industry settlements showed the sharpest declines from 1971 
levels, the bureau said. First-year wage gains dropped to 6.6 percent from the 
12.6 percent average rise a year earlier. Wage increases averaged over the 
life of the contract slowed to 5.9 percent from, last year's 10.8 percent average 
rise . 

NEW MEDIATION DJRICTOR-President Nixon has named W. J. Usery, Jr. Director of 
the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. Usery, who has been Assistant 
Secretary of Labor for labor-management relations, will succeed Curtis Counts 
in the mediation post. The 50-year-old Mr. Usery has been the Administration's 
chief trouble-shooter in labor-management relations. He joined the Labor 
Department in 1969. Before that, Usery was a grand lodge representative of the 
International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers. 



VIOLENCE NOT 'EXTORTION'— Striking workers who resort to violence cannot be charged 
with extortion and prosecuted under the Hobbs Act, the U.S. Supreme Court has 
ruled. 

The Justice Department had attempted to show that in a Louisiana strike 
the strikers had resorted to violence to "extort" higher wages from the employer. 
In a 5-to-4 decision, the High Court dismissed the case. 

4 THECARPENTER 



NEW ENGLAND 
CARPENTERS, 

MANAGEMENT 
CREATE JOBS 

THROUGH 
WOODWORK 
PROMOTION 





Arthur Lengel, roving representative of AWI in New England, describes 
his successes and failures in meeting with architects, specifications writers, 
and local and state agencies. 



■ A decade of "hard (and soft) sell" is 
beginning to pay off handsomely for the 
woodworking shops of New England. 
Members of the Architectural Woodwork 
institute, New England Chapter, met last 
month, in Boston to assess the year's 
work. A total of $5,171,000 in contracts 
was shown, on display charts, and mem- 
bers present reported hundreds of thou- 
sands of dollars more. 

AWI, New England, is the founding 
chapter of an organization which now has 
10 such chapters and 400 active members 
across the United States. It is in many 
chapters an alliance of Brotherhood local 
unions and district and state councils with 
owners and operators of woodwork 
plants, designed to promote the use of 
architectural woodwork. Operating on 
small budgets, AWI chapters do much to 
create employment in their area of the 
craft . . . through practical union-man- 
agement cooperation. ■ 



The pictures to the right, left, and below, 
show Brotherhood leaders of New Eng- 
land and shop owners and managers 
during the recent annual meeting of 
AWI, New England chapter, in Boston. 
Former General Treasurer Peter Terzick, 
shown below with Frank Maloney of Lo- 
cal 624, was one of the founders of the 
organization, along with Cedric Thomp- 
son and Francis Barry. 





Ji',1 I . 



VlfOOD ADDS BEAUTY, QUALITY 
TO NEW ENGLAND STRUCTURES 

.... thanks fo labor-management promotion 



■ Members of the New England Chap- 
ter of the Architectural Woodwork Insti- 
tute stimulate architects and builders to 
include wood in their construction plans 
(see page 5). but it takes the skilled hands 
and know-how of union millmen and car- 
penters to turn their ideas into reaUty. 

On these two pages are five examples of 
scores of such architectural-wood projects 
throughout New England which can 
trace their origins directly to the promo- 
tional activities of New England AWI and 
especially to its "man on the road," Art 
Lengel. 

An important point to remember about 
these projects is the amount of man hours 
of work it brings to the Brotherhood. The 
wood window-alls at MIT (shown at right), 
for example, required 8.000 hours of shop 
labor and 3,600 hours of site labor. Mid- 
dlesex County Courthouse (below) will 
require before completion. 34,580 hours 
of shop labor and 34.000 hours of site 
labor. 

Even bigger projects are in the mill. 
More than S800.000 in millwork will go 
into five current jobs — the Science Cen- 
ter at Harvard University. Cambridge. 
Mass., Mt. Auburn Hospital at Concord, 
Mass.: the Academic Center, Tabor Acad- 
emy, Marion, Mass.; Emerson Hospital, 
Concord, Mass.; and Salem Hospital, 
Salem, Mass. These jobs total 41,000 
hours of shop labor and 63.000 hours of 
site labor. 

The return on state and local union 
contributions to AWI's ""Alliance for 
Wood" is truly gratifying. For approxi- 
mately $15,000 invested annually in craft 
promotion through AWI. Brotherhood lo- 
cals and councils of New England get 
hundreds of thousands of dollars in 
steady and stimulating work. ■ 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY COURT- 
HOUSE. Cambridge, Mass., fea- 
tures beautiful hardwood paneling. 
At right. Ole J. Sundby. Local 40, 
installs oak panels in a court re- 
porter's box. At far right, Peter 
Savje, also of Local 40, installs 
Flame Spread 25 walnut paneling 
in an 8th floor courtroom. 









"**•* ' jtlWiHwmfc jWy. >»> n « i» lt «1rrf «^^ 



THE ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING BUILDING at Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, Cambridge, .Mass.. has floor after floor of attractive, custom- 
made «indowalls of .African mahogany, stained black and manufactured by a 
Boston firm employing Brotherhood members. 




THE CARPENTER 




T^^^f,^ ©'Y^,fVVi 




THE BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, one of the oldest and most respected in the countrj, recently opened a new addition 
with paneled reading rooms (below, riglit), a paneled director's office (below, left) and a Boston Room (above, right), where 
strictly Bostonian items are displayed. 





LEONARD-MORSE HOSPITAL, Natick, 
Mass., shown under construction below, 
features wood at many entrances, including 
the diagonally-laid strips coveruig doors to 
the loading docks and storage facilities. 



Si«^^^- 



GRANBY HIGH SCHOOL hi Granby, Connecticut, above, has 
wood shingling on exterior walls, plus architectural wood at doors 
and windows (shown above) and in school corridors and class- 
rooms. 




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ggagjaMggi^.. ' 


nnilini 


1 L 
3 B 
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■ .■ 


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ai 



Congressmen Meet Brotherhood 
Leaders at Capitol Hill Reception 



It has become a tradition with 
each new Congress that the Unit- 
ed Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America welcomes 
the new Congressmen and Sena- 
tors with a special reception on 
Capitol Hill. 

CLIC (the Carpenters Legisla- 
tive Improvement Committee) 
once again arranged the gather- 
ing, and Brotherhood leaders 
were introduced to the new solons 
by the Brotherhood's Legislative 
Advocate, Jim Bailey. 

This year, the Brotherhood was 
joined in welcoming the Con- 
gressional newcomers by legisla- 
tive representatives of the Interna- 
tional Union of Operating Engi- 
neers and the Laborers Interna- 



tional Union of North America. 

The reception was held in the 
Rayburn House Office Building at 
the close of a daily session in late 
January. 

One important aspect of the 
gathering was the opportunity it 
gave to Brotherhood leaders to 
discuss with the new legislators 
the Brotherhood's views on mat- 
ters to come before the 93rd Con- 
gress. 

Many of the new Congressmen 
came to Washington with support 
from CLIC in the general elec- 
tions, last November. They were 
grateful for the opportunity af- 
forded by the reception to ex- 
press thanks for CLIC endorse- 
ment and aid. 





CLIC Director Nichols with Cong. John 
McFall of California and Cong. William 
Lehman of Florida. 




.Tack Curran. director of legislative ac- 
tivities for the Laborers; CLIC Director 
Nichols. Legislative Advocate Bailey, and 
Bill DLxon of the Laborers. 




Jim Gary of the Operating Engineers, 
Cong. Charles WUson of Texas, CLIC 
Director Nichols, and Frank Hanley of 
the Operating Engineers. 




Ne« L'.S. Senator Dick Clark of Iowa 
with Laborers President Peter Fosco and 
CLIC Director Nichols. 



New Congressman Fortney Stark of California; General President William Sidell, 
Brotherhood Legislative Advocate Jim Bailey, House Minority Leader Gerald Pord 
of Michigan, and CLIC Director Charles Nichols. ' 




House Speaker Carl Albert of Oklahoma 
talks with General President Sidell. 



8 



THE CARPENTER 



Gotcha 
CLIC Button? 




Tools of the craft are repre- 
sented in the 1973 CLIC em- 
blem — the hammer, the plane, 
the logger's peavey, and the 
millwright's micrometer scale. 



Every member who makes a $10 
membership contribution to the 
Carpenters Legislative Improve- 
ment Committee gets a blue and 
gold lapel button bearing the 
CLIC emblem, shown in a great- 
ly enlarged version above. Get 
your button now! 

A copy of our report filed with the 
appropriate supervisory officer is (or 
will be) available for purchase from 
the Superintendent of Documents, 
United States Government Printing 
Office, Washington, D. C. 20402. 



Labor Calls on Administration 
To Fulfill Housing Promises 



In a strongly-worded statement, the 
AFL-CIO Executive Council has called 
upon the Nixon Administration to ful- 
fill its promises to rebuild the cities 
and furnish adequate housing. It de- 
plored the Administration's impound- 
ing of much-needed funds for hous- 
ing. 

The full statement is as follows: 

The AFL-CIO has long supported 
and worked toward the goal of a "de- 
cent home for every American family." 
The Federal government embraced 
this goal in 1949 when Congress en- 
acted the Taft-Wagner-Ellender Act. 
Congress reinforced this commitment 
in the Housing Act of 1968 when it 
set forth specific goals and schedules: 
26 million units, including 6 million 
units for low- and moderate-income 
families, to be built within the decade 
from 1969 to 1978. The AFL-CIO 
has always supported Federal eflforts 
to provide adequate housing for Amer- 
ica's families and the AFL-CIO de- 
clared its support for the new ten- 
year program. 

In the past four years, this Admin- 
istration has repeated the promise that 
the cities of America would be rebuilt 
and that all families would be given 
the opportunity to live in standard 
housing. This was a welcome promise 



in light of the continuing deterioration 
that was occurring in America's cities 
and the ever-growing number of house- 
holds which found themselves unable 
to afl^ord decent housing without some 
help from the Federal government. 
But on January 8th of this year, the 
departing Secretary of the Department 
of Housing and Urban Development 
announced a massive moratorium on 
subsidized housing and community de- 
velopment programs. 

Effective January 5th, three days 
prior to the public announcement, all 
new commitments were stopped for 
public housing, rent supplements, 
multi-family rental housing, home- 
ownership housing, water and sewer 
facilities, open space activities and 
public facility loans. 

Housing was dealt a double blow — 
not only were direct housing assist- 
ance funds impounded, but the funds 
needed to provide facilities and serv- 
ices supportive of non-subsidized, as 
well as subsidized, residential develop- 
ment were cut off. In July, the model 
cities and urban renewal programs, 
representing the biggest commitment 
to inner-city revitalization ever made 
by the Federal government, are sched- 
uled to meet a similar fate. 

The national commitment to a "de- 
Continued on page 39 









1590 
1631 
1694 


Washington 
Washington 
Washington 


90.52* 
16.84* 
40.00* 


1613 


Newark 

NEW YORK 


39.00 


454 
1595 


Philadelphia 
Conshohocken 




CLIC Contributions 


125.00 
10.00 










1972 Contributions received 


1831 


Washington 


14.48* 


398 


New York 


208.00 




VERMONT 




between 12/16/72 and 


2/ 15/73 


2311 


Washington 


34.16* 


374 


Buffalo 


10.00 


590 


Rutland 


7.00 














700 


Corning 


11.00 








Local 


City & State 


Amount 




IDAHO 




1757 


Buffalo 


17.00 




VIRGINIA 










609 


Idaho Falls 


28.00 


2161 


Catskill 


65.00 


1665 


Alexandria 


8.00 




ALASKA 






ILLINOIS 






OHIO 






TEXAS 




1343 


Fairbanks 


60.00 


























58 


Chicago 


376.00 


1180 


Cleveland 


5.00 


753 


Beaumont 


20.00 


906 


ARIZONA 

Glendale 


4.00 


341 
1922 


Chicago 
Chicago 


10.00 
6.00 


1750 


Cleveland 

OKLAHOMA 


14.00 


1184 


WASHINGTON 

Seattle 


5.00 




CALIFORNIA 






INDIANA 




943 


Tulsa 


31.00 


*Thls represents the 1% 


payroll 






2548 


Peru 


1.00 




■*T^ Twn^ Tfi ■» 7T *r A ^Tw 




deduction of the fuUtime Offi- 


162 


San Mateo 


6.00 


3228 


Winchester 


31.00 




PENNSYLVANIA 


cers 


and Business Representa- 


710 


Long Beach 


11.00 








321 


Connellsville 


12.00 


tives 






1109 


Visalia 


3.00 




MASSACHUSETIS 














1570 


Marysville 


20.00 


49 


Lowell 


9.50 


1973 Contributions 










1752 


Pomona 


12.00 


111 


Lawrence 


21.00 


CALIFORNIA STATE COUNCIL OF LUMBER AND 










193 


North Adams 


40.00 


SAWMILL WORKERS CONVENTION (January) ....$ 


550.00 




COLORADO 




444 


Pittsfield 


11.00 


TEXAS STATE COUNCIL LEGISLATIVE CONFER- 




55 


Denver 23.00 
CONNECTICUT 


1654 


MICHIGAN 

Midland 


5.00 


ENCE (February) . 
LOCAL UNION NO. 








1,020.00 




1701— TONAWANDA, NEW. 


1941 


Hartford 


14.00 




NEW JERSEY 




YORK, has the distinction of 


being 


the first Local to 





DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

132 Washington 33.68* 

1145 Washington 16.84* 



455 Somerville 15.96* 

781 Princeton 40.00 

1107 N. Plainfield 200.00 

1489 Burlington 80.00 



make returns for 1973 campaign. The amount of the 
contribution was $ 20.00 

NOTE: The complete listings for the year 1972 will be shown in 
the April issue 



MARCH, 1973 



SAFETY REPORT 

Did Your Employer 
Post 1972 
Summary? 

Employers were reminded at the be- 
ginning of 1973 by the U.S. Department 
of Labor that they must complete and 
post their annual simimary of job deaths, 
injuries, and illnesses in their establish- 
ments by January 31. 

The federal job safety and health law 
requires every covered employer with 
one or more employees to complete 
OSHA Form 102 — "Annual Summary of 
Occupational Injuries and Illnesses" — 
by the end of January. 

The form must be posted in work- 
places no later than Feb. 1, and left 
posted until March 1. 

"It should be placed where other no- 
tices to employees customarily are posted 



to ensure all employees see it," a Labor 
Department spokesman said. He cau- 
tioned that the law provides penalties 
against persons who knowingly falsify 
the summary. 

"During February, OSHA inspectors 
checked for posting of the summary 
during their compliance inspection visits. 
Failure to post the form results in the 
issuance of a citation," he said. 

OSHA rules exempting from record- 
keeping those employers with fewer than 
eight employees were not effective until 
Jan. 1. 1973. "This means all employers 
must complete the summary form for 
1972," the spokesman explained, "but 
many will be exempt next year." 

Two Industry Firms 
Seek OSHA 
Variances 

The Department of Labor has an- 
nounced that several companies are seek- 
ing variances from federal job safety 
and health standards. Among them are 
two in our own industry: 



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LEATHER GRIP 





Estwing 

NAIL HAMMERS 

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GRIP 



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Choice of original leather grip or Estwing exclusive nylon-vinyl cushion 

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Estwing Tools are sold by leading hardware and building supply dealers 
everywhere, 

ESTWING SAFETY GOGGLES 

Always wear Estwing Safety Gog- 
gles for utmost eye protection 
when using hand tools. 

ONLY $1.85 




Soft, comfortable, flexible. 



Estwing 



Mfg. Co. 



Dept. C-3. 2647 8th St. 

ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS 61101 



Formatop, Inc., of Campbell, Calif., 
requested a variance from federal stand- 
ards requiring that hand-fed rip and 
crosscut table saws be guarded by hoods 
and furnished with spreaders which pre- 
vent the saw blade from binding. If 
granted, the variance, with certain limi- 
tations, would allow the company to use 
the saws without guards when cutting 
particle board, plastic, and small wood 
pieces. Copies are at OSHA offices in 
San Francisco. 

Boyertown Planing Mill Company, 
of Boyertown, Pa., requested a variance 
from regulations that adequate washing 
facilities be provided in or adjacent to 
every toilet room. If granted, the vari- 
ance would allow continued use of men's 
washing facilities now located approxi- 
mately 40 feet from the men's toilet fa- 
cilities. Copies are at OSHA offices in 
Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. 

OSHA Compliance 
Training Courses 

The Labor Department has announced 
its 1973 timetable of training courses to 
assist voluntary compliance with job 
safety and health rules. 

Four courses last year proved so suc- 
cessful that 29 week-long sessions are 
planned in 1973 at the Occupational 
Safety and Health Administration 
(OSHA) Training Institute near Chicago. 

The voluntary compliance training 
course provides guidelines for develop- 
ing systematic inspection procedures co- 
ordinated directly with existing OSH.A. 
safety and health standards. 

Those eligible for the courses, which 
begin Feb. 5. are: employer representa- 
tives, representatives of trade associa- 
tions, employee organizations, insurance 
companies, local safety councils, local 
chapters of professional safety and health 
societies, and college and university in- 
structors. 

No fee will be charged for the course, 
but living costs, travel and other expenses 
are the responsibility of the student. 
Classes will be held to a maximum of 
25 students. 

1973 SESSION DATES 
Mar. 5-9 Jun. 25-29 

Mar. 12-16 Jul. 9-13 

Mar. 19-23 Jul. 16-20 

Mar. 26-30 Jul. 23-27 

Apr. 2-6 Jul. 30-Aug. 3 

Apr. 9-13 Aug. 6-10 

Apr. 23-27 Aug. 27-31 

Apr. 30-May 4 Oct. 15-19 

May 7-11 Oct. 29-Nov. 2 

May 14-18 . Nov. 12-16 

May 21-25 Nov. 26-30 

Jun. 4-8 Dec. 3-7 

lun. 11-15 Dec. 10-14 

Course registration forms are available 
from: 

Registrar 

U. S. Department of Labor 

OSHA Training Institute 

10600 W. Higgins Road 

Rosemont, Illinois 60018 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



Lifflibei: Metal. Concrete. 
Worm-drive Skilsavroots 
throogh almost 



anything. 




Powerful 13 amp 
motor delivers power v , 
for most demanding cut- ^* . 
ting jobs. % High-torque, worm- 
drive gears mean fast cutting of lumber, metal, 
stone, tough compositions. % Total ball bear- 
ing construction for long, trouble free life. 
Air flow hood directs cool air over gear case 
and cleans line of cut. % Extra strong foot of 
heavy gauge ribbed steel steadies saw for ac- 
curate cutting. 



Be sure you're getting high quality alloy 
or carbon steel. Insist on genuine Skil 
saw blades. 

Substitool keeps you on the job if 
we keep your saw in our shop for repair. 
Register with Skil as a professional tradesman 
when you purchase a Skilsaw worm-drive saw 
or other Skil tool covered by the Skil Substitool 
program. 

And if we ever have to keep it in our shop for 
service we'll lend you a Substitool free. 



® 



Nobody was ever sorry he bougtit the host there is. 




anmn 




^iC 



Brotherhood Passes 1957 Peak 

in Membership, 
Launches Major Organizing 

Effort for 1973 



Every member has an interest in organizing the unorganized. 

To keep you up to date on activities in the Brotherhood's 

expanding organizing program, we plan to publish 

periodical articles in THE CARPENTER. 



■ Director of Organizing James A. 
Parker advises that, in the field of 
organizing, the Brotherhood's rec- 
ord for 1972 is one in which every 
member can take pride. According 
to the records of General Secretary 
R. E. Livingston, we closed out 
1972 with the largest membership 
since 1957! • It is the goal of your 
Organizing Department, with the 
cooperation and assistance of all 
of our officers and members, to 
make 1973 an even more successful 
year from an organizing standpoint. 

General President Sidell notes that 
this increase in membership not only 
reflects greater effort on the part of 
the General Executive Board, the 
General Representatives and our 
organizing staff, development of 
new procedures and organizing tech- 
niques by the Organizing Depart- 
ment, but also to a large degree 
reflects increased interest for orga- 
nizing the unorganized on a local 
level. We extend appreciation and 
congratulations to the officers and 
members who, through their interest 
and efforts, contributed to our mem- 
bership gains. 

Organizing the unorganized is a 
matter of primary concern to Gen- 
eral President Sidell, your resident 
General Officers, General Executive 
Board Members and the Department 
of Organization. We believe that 
every member also has an interest 
in organizing the unorganized. 



Membership is the muscle of 
our organization. Consequently, the 
wages and conditions negotiated for 
our membership is largely deter- 
mined by how well our industn,' or 
area is organized. Therefore, the bus- 
iness of organizing the unorganized 
is a vital function of our organiza- 
tion, deserving of the interest and 
concern of every member of our 
Brotherhood. The continued interest 
and cooperation of all officers and 
members in organizing the unorga- 
nized workers is solicited. 

There are a number of residential 
organizing campaigns in progress at 
present across the States and Prov- 
inces of Canada but there is a need 
for greater emphasis on organizing 
residential construction carpenters. 
Our best estimates indicate that we 
have only about 25 to 30% of the 
residential carpenters organized. 
Construction Councils and Local 
Unions should survey their areas to 
determine the extent of organization 
on residential work in their respec- 
tive areas and if this work is not 
organized for our members, a con- 
certed organizing program should be 
considered. The Organizing Depart- 
ment will lend assistance in the plan- 
ning and launching of local organiz- 
ing programs. However, to be suc- 
cessful, there must be a genuine 
interest for organization on a local 
level — coupled with the full support 
of the local officers and members. 

Considerable progress is being 



made in organizing industrial work- 
ers employed in mills, shops and 
factories throughout the United 
States and Canada. Our industrial 
membership showed an increase of 
almost 5.0% in 1972. It is estimated 
we have a potential of over one mil- 
lion additional members in the in- 
dustrial field and over a half million 
potential in the residential field. 
Your Organizing Department will be 
putting greater emphasis on orga- 
nizing the unorganized in both the 
industrial and constnaction fields. 
We solicit the cooperation of all lo- 
cal unions and councils in orga- 
nizing the unorganized. 

The Tally Sheet 

The UBC was successful in the 
following Representation Elections 
conducted by the National Labor 
Relations Board: 

® Employees of Diamond Inter- 
national's plant at Red Bluff, Cali- 
fornia. 

• Employees of Hynes & Howes 
Homes, New Wind, Illinois. 

• Employees at Alpine Cabinet 
Company in Tinmath, Colorado. 

• Employees at Frank Paxton 
Company in Fort Worth, Texas. 

• Employees at Low Cost Forms, 
Inc., in Laurel, Mississippi. 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



• Employees at Bellgrade Lum- 
ber Company, Cary, Mississippi. 

• Employees at Tiffany Conway, 
Inc., Conway, Arkansas. 

• In a representative election at 
CONCHEMCO, INC. (Westchester 
Homes), Wichita, Tex. 

We would like to commend Ben 
Catterton, Business Representative 
Baltimore District Council and one 
of his assistants for bringing the elec- 
tion at Petersen Moore, Inc., to a 
successful conclusion. 



Rep. James Dolan Dies In Auto Accident 



Representative James Dolan was 
involved in an auto accident on 
Highway 29 near Warrenton, Va. 
on Wednesday. February 14, 
1973. On the evening of the 15th 
of February Representative Dolan 
succumbed to injuries sustained in 
the accident. Leo Decker, organi- 
zer in the Washington, D.C. area, 
was also in the car, but sustained 
only minor injuries. 



Dolan was born July 15, 1926, 
and was initiated into Locai 2031, 
Brooklyn, N.Y., on October 7, 
1951, while employed in the ship- 
yards there. 

He joined the General Office 
staff on November 22, 1965. He 
was very capable, and the Broth- 
erhood will greatly feel the lo.'.s of 
his talents. 



Jobless Pay Overhaul 
Now Up to Congress 

It's up to Congress to bring about the 
"sweeping changes'" needed in the na- 
tion's unemployment compensation sys- 
tem, the AL-CIO Council said at its 
recent winter meeting. 

The states had their chance — and 
failed. 

More than three and one-half years 
ago, the council noted, Pres. Nixon asked 



the states to raise ma.ximum jobless ben- 
efits to two-thirds of the average state 
weekly wage in covered employment. He 
called on the states to act within two 
years in order to avert the need for 
federal action. 

"With the exception of a handful of 
states," the council said, the request to 
raise benefits "has been shamefully ig- 
nored." 

The benefit level proposed by the 
President has been enacted only in Ar- 
kansas, Hawaii, Utah, the District of 



Columbia, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, 
Puerto Rico and Wisconsin. But the 
maximum benefit is less than 30 percent 
of the average wage in five states, and 
less than 50 percent in 22 states. Three 
out of five workers are employes in 
states where a worker receiving the 
average wage will get less than half his 
lost wage if he loses his job. 

The council termed the various ex- 
tended benefit programs enacted by Con- 
gress "grossly inadequate" during periods 
of continued high unemployment. 



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MARCH, 1973 



13 




ANADIAN 



Federal and Provincial 
Governments Move to 
Prevent Land Speculation 



Few matters of consumer concern 
have been making more headlines in 
the last few months than housing. 

Everything about housing has made 
the news, enough news to fill books. 
In fact whole books on the subject 
have appeared in the last few years, 
first the Hellyer report, then the Lith- 
wick report (6 volumes!), followed by 
the Dennis report, which was such 
a hot potato that the government re- 
fused to print it. So the researchers 
did ... at their own expense. 

What makes housing so newsworthy 
is that there is not enough of it at 
prices people can afford, and too many 
highrise apartments have been built. 
Many people can't get used to high- 
rise living. They prefer their own 
home. 

Last year was a record year for 
residential construction, but still the 
demand is there, prices are going up. 

Prices are on the rise, not because 
of construction costs, but because of 
land costs which have become a na- 
tional scandal. 

In every urban area developers and 
speculators have bought up vast acre- 
ages and are holding on to make 
money, which many are now doing. 

The Metro area of Toronto has the 
highest land costs on the North Amer- 
ican continent. They went up 507c 
in the last year to $17,000 to $20,000 
for an average housing lot. 

Peculiarly enough, the developers 
have been blaming government for the 
rise! They claim that the governments 
— provincial, although the federal gov- 
ernment has shared the blame — are 
not servicing enough vacant land. If 
the government(s) would put in the 
services for a surplus of lots, the extra 
supply would keep prices down. 

But well-informed critics of land 



speculation have said that the only 
long-term answer is public land banks 
— the purchase by the government of 
substantial acreages around all urban 
areas before the speculators can get 
hold of it. 

This is what the federal government 
has decided to do. It is going to sup- 
ply $500 million in the next five years 
for land purchases in cooperation with 
provincial and municipal governments. 
The Ontario government has already 
asked for $93 million to buy up about 
25,000 acres north east of Metro To- 
ronto. The B.C. government has asked 
for $75 million. 

Real estate men say that land prices 
around Ottawa and Vancouver are 
also going to escalate. 

The federal government is also 
going to subsidize lower income fami- 
lies who want to buy homes. Up until 
now. only rental housing has been sub- 
sidized. The objective of the new 
policy is to enable a breadwinner 
earning as little as $100 a week to 
buy a home at a monthly cost of 
only $90 including interest, principal 
and taxes. 

This is also likely to be a good 
year for residential construction. 

Major Bargaining 
Year in Construction 

This will be a major bargaining year 
for construction. Over 300 pattern- 
setting contracts are involved, of 
which 229 are in the province of 
Ontario, 27 in Alberta, 24 in Nova 
Scotia and 10 in New Brunswick. 
Bargaining in Quebec takes place on a 
provincewide basis. 

Ontario is aiming toward province- 



wide bargaining but not more than 
a quarter of the management groups 
have been cleared by the Ontario 
Labor Relations Board. 

The Canadian Construction Asso- 
ciation is looking for ways to improve 
relations in building trades bargaining 
and invited a senior union representa- 
tive to address their convention in 
Saskatoon in February. 

James McCambly, executive secre- 
tary of the advisory board of the 
Building Trades unions in Canada, 
told the delegates that a reduction of 
tensions would be of mutual benefit 
but that representatives of 200,000 
construction workers would not buckle 
under if contractors organize "with 
the object of beating unions". 

A joint labor-management confer- 
ence is scheduled for March 6 and 7 
in Ottawa to see if a meeting of minds 
can be achieved on the industry's 
problem areas. 

To Be World's Tallest 




A cloud-piercing 1.805 foot CN Tower 
is beiiifi built at Toronto's waterfront. 
Sclieduled for completion in 1974, it 
»ill be the tallest self-supporting struc- 
ture in the world. 

It will reach a third of a mile into the 
sky from 10 acres of parking around 
its base. 

The estimated cost is $21 million and 
it is expected to provide a total of a 
thousand jobs. 

The Tower will feature a six-story 
Sky Pod at the 1,100 foot level and be 
topped bj a 305 foot mast. 

Its sponsors, Canadian National Rail- 
ways, promises that it «'ill be one of 
the engineering and architectural won- 
ders of the world. 

For comparison the famous Eiffel 
Tower in Paris is 984 feet high. 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



Commercial Building 
Expected to Rise 1 0% 

Commercial and industrial construc- 
tion is expected to increase this year 
by a margin of over 10%. 

Non-residential construction lagged 
in 1972 compared with residential con- 
struction, which showed an 18% in- 
crease. 

But market expansion and better 
profits last year is encouraging busi- 
ness to expand plant and equipment 
this year. 

As much as the federal authorities 
fear inflation, they now fear unem- 
ployment more. 

Deliberate contraction of construc- 
tion which dampened the industry in 
1970 and 1971 is very unlikely to be 
government policy now . . . not with 
a minority government hanging on for 
its life. 

Gap Between Rich 
And Poor Unchanged 

Another report on incomes shows 
that the gap between rich and poor in 
Canada has not narrowed in the last 
25 years. 

Dr. Andre Raynauld, chairman of 
the Economic Council of Canada, says 
that various measures aimed at income 
redistribution such as taxes and gov- 
ernment expenditures have had little 
result and have even increased in- 
equality in some areas. 

The latest income study shows that 
the richest 20% of family units get 
45% of total income while the bot- 
tom 20% get 4.3%. 

Incomes in the United States ap- 
pear to be more equally distributed, 
said the ECC chairman, but not by 
much. 

Buildings Go High 
In Metro Toronto 

About the fastest rate of construc- 
tion increase on the North American 
continent is still taking place in the 
Metro Toronto area. 

The 56-story Toronto Dominion 
Centre was followed by the 60-story 
Commerce Court, and this is now 
being exceeded by a third bank struc- 
ture, a 70-story Bank of Montreal 
building across from the other two. 

The B of M project is going to 
take up a whole city block of prime 
downtown property, but it is going to 
be upstaged by the billion dollar CN- 
CP project at the lakefront. 

MARCH, 1973 



This joint project by Canada's two 
major railway systems is known as 
Metro Centre. 

The kingpin of the development is 
to be the CN Tower, a $21 million 
Canadian National Railways commu- 
nications, radio, television and obser- 
vation tower of magnificent propor- 
tions. 

At 1.805 feet, it will be the world's 
highest structure. In comparison, the 
Ostankino Tower in Moscow is 1,748 
feet, the World Trade Center in New 
York is 1,727 feet, the Empire State 
Building 1.472 feet. 

Ground for the structure is already 
being cleared, and construction will 
employ a thousand men. 

Metro Centre will also include a 
new railway station, a covention cen- 
ter, a new symphony hall and 1,500 
apartment units. 

Construction Flaws 
In Growing Number 

Whether homes are being built too 
fast or by incompetent builders, home- 
buyers have been complaining more 
than ever before of serious delays and 
flaws in construction. 

The federal agency, Central Mort- 
gage and Housing, has been meeting 
with the building industry to resolve 
the problem. 

H. W. Hignett, CMHC president, 
is working on a plan to give buyers 
the kind of warranty or guarantee 
which go with a TV set or an auto- 
mobile. 

He suggested some form of insur- 
ance against failure to complete a 
house or to make good the warranty 
and against subsequent structural fail- 
ure or unsatisfactory performance. 

Federal urban affairs minister Ron 
Basford said that the legislation pro- 
posed would protect buyers against 
shoddy workmanship and fiy-by-night 
builders. 

Another form of protection would 
be unionization of the homebuilding 
industry, but maybe they haven't 
thought of that. 

Manufacturers Head 
Sees Continued Inflation 

Inflation may get worse before it 
gets better, said the president of the 
Canadian Manufacturers Association, 
just a few days after the president of 
the Canadian Chamber of Commerce 
said that inflation in Canada has not 
reached a critical stage. 

But both were against wage and 
price controls. 



15 




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16 



THE CARPENTER 



A gallery of pictures showing some of the senior members of the 
Brotherhood who recently received 25-year or 50-year service pins. 



DENVER, COLO. 

Carpenters Local 2249 recently held 
a dinner honoring all its 25-year 
members and their ladies. Pins were 
presented to the new 25-year members 
by Edward Rylands, president of 
the District Council of Denver 
and Vicinity. 

The picture shows all 25-year 
members attending the dinner and 
the officers. 

First row, Robert Christian, Tom 
Miller, Perry Callicatt, James Mc- 
Dermott, Earl Stone, Fred Pndilla, 
William Martin. 

Second row, Ralph Zimmerman, 
LeRoy Clark. 25 year member and 
president of Local 2249. 

Third row, Stephen Hall, Forrest 
Crouse, business representative of 
Local 2249, Samuel C. Reynolds, 
James Pooley, Philip Winburn, Floyd 
Hitchcock, financial secretary of 
Local 2249. 

Those members honored but unable 
to attend the dinner were: Roy Berg, 
General Representative of Colorado; 
Zacharlich Boles; Darrell Brooks; 
David Charyonia; Donald Colburn; 
Jeff M. Cox, Sr.; Floyd Hardy; 
Orville Jones; Eugene Phillips; Harry 
Rill; Charles Schmiicker; Roy 
Townsend; and Robert Unnerstall. 

HIALEAH, FLORIDA 

William Oliver, business 
representative of Local 727; presented 
25-year pins recently to members. 

Front row, left to right, Charles W. 
McNulty, E. H. Palumbo, Daniel 
Pompi, Harold Puthoff, Russell W. 
Schenck, Charles L. Sperry, Helmuth 




DENVER, COLO. 




HIALEAH, FLA. 

Neilsen, and Larry Scott. 

Back row, left to right, Paul J. 
Cafacob, Frank Fischer, Austin 
Foster, Chris Giannone, Marion 
Gustafson, A. L. Henry, Marvin 
Hood, Glen Hughes, Emile Janelle, 
Richard Monaghan, and Homer 
Morrow' 

UNION, N.J. 

The following members of Local 
1209 have received their 25- and 
50-year pins. 50-year pins; Alex 
Berlin, George Miekle, and John 
Uhrin. 

25-year pins; Peter Barone, Paul 
Bella, John Clark, James Flaherty, 
John Galiney, George Gross, August 
Hartmann, Leo Jsherwood, Walter 



Kissel, James Robertazzi, William 
Sierchio, Patrick Sodano, James 
Stefanik, Murdock Stevenson, and 
James Ward. 

A special award was made to John 
A. Frank for 61 years of service, 

OLEAN, N. Y. 

Local 546 of Olean, recently 
held a dinner at the Castle Restaurant 
honoring Peter Sheeser for serving 
18 years as its president. Others 
honored, shown in the picture, were, 
left to right: Joseph Pagano, Dunkirk, 
business agent, Edward Heit, Olean, 
25-year member, Mr. Sheeser, 
Sam Ruggiano, Syracuse. General 
Representative, and James Wilber, 
Olean, Local 546 president. 




UNION, N J 



it». . 'A. ^C'tAt , ::S'ji^' iL,'.j! t 



OLEAN, NY. 



MARCH, 1973 



17 




CHICAGO, ILL. 

Local I held a special meeting 
recently to honor tliose members who 
completed 50- and 25-years of 
membership. 

In the picture above a 50-year 
membership pin is presented to 
Hormidas LaPierre by Executive Vice 
President of the Chicago District 
Council, Fred A . Mock, with 
President of Local 1 Earl W. 
McLennan standing between them. 

The group picture below shows: 

First row, left to right: Hormidas 
LaPierre, 50-years, and the following 
are all 25-years: Richard S. Anderson, 
Louis Bierwirth, Ben Ceglarek, Ernest 
Ceglarek, Stephen Czulak, Robert J. 
Forton, Donald E. Goebelt, and 
Stanley J. Giizik. 

Second row: Victor O. Herman, 
Elvin H. Johns, William E. Jordan, 
William A. Keslin, Harry A. Knock, 
John Kunowski, Joseph Maggio, 
Henry Oster, and Clarence Rudolph. 

Third row: S. J. Silianoff. Lewis W. 
Simmons, Arthur F. Sron, Ralph 
Steubner. Albert Stirn. William 
Tiefenthal, John Tracy, Warren Trout, 
and L. Van Mersbergen. 

Fourth row: Casimir Vrasic, 
Trustee; Walter Bielak, Warden: John 
Coughlin, Conductor: Kenneth J. 
Kinney, Recording Secretary; Earl W. 
McLennan, Business Representative, 
and President; August Vollmer, Vice 
President; James J. Garnett, Trustee; 
Norman M. Erickson, Trustee; and 
Richard Garnett, Financial 
Secretary-Treasurer. 

The following members with 50- 
and 25-years membership were unable 
to attend: 

50-years: John J. Collins, John A. 
Ekdahl, William H. Holgate, Paul A. 



MEDFORD, ORE. 



Local 2067 held a pin-presentation ceremony, last year, and honored 
19 of its senior members. They are shown in two accompanying photographs. 

In the picture above. Local 2067 President D. W. Bowling, center, 
presents pins to the following: Harley Harper, James Hartgraves, James 
Thompsoti, Don Burns. David Brabbin, Lou Caldwell, Everett Burwash, 
Henry Keplinger, Amos Mc Daniel, Martin Jorde, and Lawrence Burnett. 

In the picture below, from left, are Paul Patton, Walter Martin, Jack 
Gaza, Milo Morey, Local President Bowling, Woody Mahan, Bill Bittle, 
George Emmett, and Anthony Kanclier. 








■^f*99^'Sf<V^t^ '^f s'o^v '-. _■- 



Hughes, Godfrey L. Johnson, Carmelo Hitzman, Mathias P. Huberty, C. E, 



Locascio, Harvel Maze and Albert F. 
Renter. 

25-years: Thomas F. Bagge, Joseph 
Briody, Wilbur Bruty, Raymond 
Burke. William J . Divis, James R. 
Duffy, Mitchell Gajda, Frederick G. 



Jasinski, Theodore E. Jolinson, 
William J. Nelsen, Edward Rizzuto, 
Michael Rysso, Edward L. Schwab, 
Stanley J. Soha, Edward A. Stevens, 
Edward Von Laven, and Alex 
Wojciitch. 



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STILLWATER, OKLA. 

STILLWATER, OKLA. 

Local 1686 recently held a special 
dinner meeting with members' families 
as guests to honor the members of 
the Brotherhood with 20 years 
or more of continuous service. G. A. 
'Pete' McNeil, General Representative 
of the Oklahoma District, Moore, 
Okla., presented the awards. 

Pictured, standing, left to riglit, are 
Kermit L. Castleberry, secretary- 
treasurer of the Oklahoma State 
Council of Carpenters, Muskogee, 
Okla.; G. A. McNeil, and Henry 
C. Cawood, business representative, 
20 years. Other members and pin 
recipients are seated, left to right, 
Clarence Waite, 30 years; Bert 
Hejduk, 30 years; Leroy Craig, 25 
years; Robert Cox, 25 years; Horace 
Ware, Jr., 30 years; and Bob Gripe. 



Second row, Donald Taylor; Cecil 
Metcalf, 30 years; Herman King, 25 
years, Clarence Maxwell, Leverne 
Smitli; Clarence Rice. 

Third row. Buddy Gripe; Robert 
D. Sloan, president; C. C. McDonald, 
30 years, recording secretary; 
Reinhardt Klein; Earl Sharpton; 
Frank Carr; Raymond Tracey; 
Charles Ritter, trustee; Samuel 
Mitchell, trustee. 

Fourth row, Leon Coonrod, Victor 
Testerman, Gary Blair, Tilford 
Blair, and Frankie Bowman. 

Other members honored but not 
present were John Heusel, 45 years; 
Wilbur Johnston, 20 eyars; Lee 
Vickers, 20 years; Edward Hejduk, 
20 years; Paul Lasiter, 25 years; and 
J. H. Goodlier, 30 years. 



BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 

At the Animal Old Timer's Night 
Dinner-Dance held recently by Local 
115, the following men were honored: 
Front row, seated, receiving 50-year 
pins, from left to right, Alvin 
Knecht and Raymond Watson. 
Brother Watson traveled from Florida 
to receive his pin and attend the 
dinner-dance. Back row, from left, 
Robert McLevy, business 
representative; Peter Scinto, chairman 
of the affair; Arthur Williamson. 
Louis LaChioma; Charles Rideg; 
Charles Bayusik; Otto Brauer; Albert 
Rusatsky; Charles Kellogg: Ivan 
O'Brien; Carl Fagerholm; A ntonio 
Frazao; Silivio D'Ulio; and Thomas 
Newman, president of Local 115. 



BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 




MARCH, 1973 



19 



\Aame^ 



SALINAS, CALIF. 

Carpenters Local 925, Salinas, 
honored its 25 and 50-year members 
at a recent pin-presentation dinner. 
Acting as master of ceremonies 
was Wayne Pierce, General Represen- 
tative. Guest speaker of the evening 
was Al Figone, recently retired 
secretary of the five Bay Counties 
District Council. Pierce and Figone 
presented pins to members attending. 

Because he was unable to attend, W . 
Frank Butler received his 50-year 
pin from Derrel Ross, president 
of Local 925. at a special presentation 
at the Carpenters Hall. Brother 
Butler has since passed away. 

In the first picture, (1) left to right. 
Derrel Ross, president of Local 925 
and business representative Harry 
Koue. 53-year member of Local 925 
(all 53 years were as a member 
of Local 925. Salinas); Al Figone, 
recently retired secretary, 5 Bay 
Counties District Council; and Wayne 
Pierce. General Representative, 
United Brotherhood. 

In the smcdl picture (2) are W. 
Frank Butler. 53-year member of 
Local 925, since passed away, and 
Derrel Ross, president and business 
representative of Local 925. 

In the third picture (3) left to right. 
Front row, are Rudolph Kershing, 
John C. Pryer, Walter Johnson, 
Kenneth W. Boles, Frank Suinrall, 
Harry Koue, 53-year member; Al 
Figone, retired secretary five Bay 




District Council; Tout Green, 
Herman Childers, David T. Craddock, 
James G. Sumrall. and Paid Duke. 

Back row. Fowler Clinton. Robert 
Temmermand, Walter Gryczan, 
Miles Fort. Arthur Bernard. 
W. W. Reedy, Raymond G. Pi Ion, 
Cloyd Thompson, and Paul Mazzuca. 

In the next picture, (4) 

Front row, Wayne Field, Roger 
L. Monroe. Jr.. Elmer Wasson, 
Gerlin L. Robison. Richard T. 
Peaslee, James P. Juncker, Nick P. 
Mascovich, Virgil Fransen, Alfred 
Jeska. and Julio Duron. Center row, 
Riifus F. Robinson, Lambert Hazelaar, 
W. L. Kincade, George Maddox, 
Joseph W. Kassing, and Johnny 
Nielson. Back row, Louis Rhodd. 
Charles Young, James T. Reese, C. H. 
McCollum, Frank Barago, V. W. 
Liindquist. Howard C. Jolmson, 
John Simmons, C. F. Simmons, 
Edward Young, and Montelle Miller. 

The 25-year members unable to 
attend the banquet included; Lewis 
Ball. Lyle Beardslee. Billy Beleu, 
Robert Benoit, Roger Benoit, Onis 




Bradley. Murrel Clark, Garvin Crites, 
Ernest Darnell. Mi I ford DeWitt, 
George Duke, Cecil Griffith, Henry 
Hornshy. Boyd Hubbard, Ben Jordon, 
Robert Kjolsing, Lee Long, J. R. 
Loudermilk. George McCafferty, 
Theodore Meeker, Fred Milloway, 
Russell Moline, Glenn Neal, Joseph 
Pereira, Antonio Sanchez, S. O. 
Smalley. Jess Smith. William Smith, 
Karl Stearns, Warren Tietz, and 
Dewey Usrey. 





sa^S'^" :««. 








THE CARPENTER 




25-YEAR MEMBERS 




35-YEAR MEMBERS 



LONGVIEW, TEX. 

Carpenters' Local 1097 , Longview, 
recently held a dinner party and 
service pin presentation. 

In the top picture are members 
receiving 25-year pins. Front rotv, 
left to right, A. C. .Shirley. Texas State 
Council of Carpenters. Fred 
Crawford, W. O. Davis, H. G. 
Allen, Joe C. Smith, Sr.. E. C. Wynn. 
Guy Patterson, H. J. Harper, W. H. 
Hill, Raymond Combs, J. E. 
Nicely, and Billy J. Merritt. 

Back row, left to right, Austin 1. 
Allen, John W . Gregg, William Bass, 
R. T. Patterson. Robert Huckaby, 
Lloyd Moore. L. C. Bowden, Mack 
W. McCollum, Travis W. Castle, 
and J. D. Creamer. 

In the second picture are members 
receiving 30-year pins. Front row, 
left to right, A. C. Shirley, Texas 
State Council of Carpenters, W. A. 
Whiteside. W. H. Dobbins, W. A. 
Austell, O. L. Rulledge. W. S. 
Rutherford. Robert L. Bass, C. T. 
Sypert, A. R. Rainey. Verlin Nicely, 
J. W. Grigsby, Conrad Morgan, E. H. 
McKinley. and Buster H. Moon. 

Back row, left to right, E. L. 




40, 45-YEAR MEMBERS 



Harvey. B. M. Downs. C. W . Davis. 
W. E. Stephenson, Rev. L. K. Brashier, 
J. M. Rutledge, I. W. Arnold. A. M. 
Fonville, G. L. Grider, A. R. Helm, 
M. E. Jordan, Buster Ferguson, and 
Colly Heim, Jr.. business 
representative. 

In the third picture are members 
receiving 35-year pins. Front row, left 
to right. E. C. Mc A I pine, Guy 
Wickersham. Van B. Griffin, J . W. 
Gentry, George M. Mitchell, 
C. T. Sypert, President. 

Back row, left to right, A. C. 



Shirley. Texas State Council of Car- 
penters. D. D. Pliler. Gid McDonald, 
R. L. Thompson, Ed Leaverlon, 
N. F. Graves. J. O. Thompson, 
W. W. Utzman, Jr.. G. A. Dowdeii, 
and Colly Heim. Jr., business 
representative. 

In the final picture, left to right, 
A. C. Shirley, Texas State Council of 
Carpenters: Clarence E. Hill. 40- 
year pin; C. H. Leach, 40-year pin: 
D. L. Brown, 45-year pin: C. T. 
Sypert. president: and Colly Heim, 
Jr., business representative. 



MARCH, 1973 



21 



/ '^ 





WATERBURY, CONN. 

Members of Local 260 recently 
held an award dinner dance at 
Waverly Inn, Cheshire, Conn., 
honoring members with 25 through 66 
years of membership in the United 
Brotherhood. 

In the first picture, (I), beginning at 
left: Edward Yezierski, business 
representative, Local 260; Joseph 
Mariano, 55-year member; Francis 
Rinaldi, president. Local 260; and 
Arthur Davis, International 
Representative. 

(2) Over 50-year membership, from 
left: John Hulstrunk, 54 years; Joseph 
Mariano, 55 years; John VonHorsten, 
53 years; John Phillips, 57 years; and 
Joseph Cipriano, 56 years. 



(3) From left to right, first row, 
Edward Yezierski, 26 years. Business 
Representative: Frank Washes, 33 
years; Richard Morrissey, 26 years; 
Edward Ketchledge, 26 years; Elmer 
Phillips, 35 years; John Sexton, 29 
years; Stanley Petro, 29 years; Joseph 
Castagna, 35 years; and Lawrence 
Blanc, 25 years. Second row: William 
Begley, 36 years; Vincent Wisausky, 
28 years; John Simmons, 25 years; 
Joseph Witek, 26 years; Anthony 
Pilla, 29 years; Rocco Triano, 26 
years; Andrew Kapfer, 31 years; 
Arthur Zorn, 33 years; M. Raymond 
Dorval, 25 years, Financial Secretary; 
and Matthew Kaminski, 35 years. 

(4) Left to right, first row; George 



Graham, 26 years; John leronimo, 32 
years. Vice President; Louis Kosko, 
37 years; James leronimo, 31 years; 
Carlo Cocchiola, 35 years; Earle 
Cooper, 26 years; Joseph lecture, 33 
years; Charles Stauffer, 33 years; 
Harold Lane, 29 years; and Arthur 
Hassinger, 33 years. Second row: 
Theodore Grieder, 33 years; William 
Triano, 27 years; Gustave Gohs, 36 
years; Ovila Pineault, 27 years; 
Nicholas Minuto, 30 years; Isaia 
Bernabi, 26 years; Donald Mancini, 
26 years; Elmer Wood, 30 years; 
Alfonse Alencynowicz, 26 years; John 
Arnold, 26 years; and Leander 
Bernier, 34 years. 





22 



THE CARPENTER 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 

During 1972 Millwrights Local 102 
held its first pin presentation 
ceremony at the Bartalini Hall- 
Carpenter Local 36 in Oakland. 
Service pins were presented by A. A. 
Figone, secretary of the Bay Counties 
District Council of Carpenters, and 
General Representatives Clarence 
Briggs and James Curry. 

The accompany pictures show the 
following: 

(1) W. K. Paris, receiving his 60- 
year pin from General Representative 
Briggs. 

(2) General Representative James 
Curry receiving his 25-year pin front 
General Representative Briggs. 

(3) Ray Green, business representa- 
tive, retired, receiving his 25-year pin 
from General Representative James 
Curry. 

(4) Ray Green received special 
recognition from the members of 
Millwrights Local 102 in appreciation 
for his years of service as business 
representative. The presentation was 
made by A. A. Figone, secretary of 
the Bay Counties District Council of 
Carpenters, who has since retired. 

(5} Members of Millwrights Local 
102 who participated in the cere- 
monies are shown in the big picture. 
They include: W. K. Paris, 60-year 
pin; George Zierman, 35-year pin; 30- 
year pins were presented to: Sam 
Beavers, W. R. Black, W. A. 
Letchworth, D. H. Masterson, F. M. 
Pennington, William Rich, Luther 
Shockey and Roy Staton, Sr. 25-year 
pins were presented to: Manuel 
A villa, Carl Bremer, Walter Chapman, 
Charles Hartman, Chester Kirkman, 
George Bangs, Paul Woofter. James 
Curry, Ray Green, William Hill, 
Robert Miller, Van Morgan, Charles 
Nelsson, John Onstott, Otis Rainey, 
Sidney Salyer, Charles Staton, William 





Winford, Charles Bowles, Joseph 
Bellorado, Reginald Colby, James 
Curtis, D. L. Franklin, Manuel 
Gomes, Wilbur Hieb, Neil Hon, 
David Lewers. John McFarlane, John 
Miller, Herman Norris, John Presler, 
Carlo Rizzato, A. J. Tennier, and 
Leland Wolford. 

Those who were unable to attend 
were: J. D. Jensen, 35-year pin; 
Herbert Coleman, Gerald Malchus, 
Ivan Rawlings, William Dishmon, 
John Ackerman, Kai Bonnez, Ed 





Hedlund, William J. Kerner, Clyde 
Moreland, Paid Peterson, A lois 
Sabrowske, James Clarke, A. J. 
Steele, Graver Lott, H. L. Smith, 
John Baker, George Brookshire, Fred 
Crackles, Joseph Klier, Odie Lewallen, 
A . Cordeiro, David Edwards. William 
Rickard, Nels Sandstrom, Virgil 
TiiUis. Harold Aronson, Cecil Dell, 
Kenneth Parker. Robert Pike, James 
Pollock, and A I Walhood received 
service pins which were mailed. 




MARCH, 1973 



23 




ENCLEWOOD, COLO. 

Local 15S3 recently held a 25-year 
membership dinner. Honored tvere 
the following: 

First row, left to right, William 
Bradbury, Wolfe Popp, Samuel 
Harris, Robert Chamberlain, Edward 
Rylands, Ralph Leensvaart, Leonard 
Nelson, Albert Schwindt, and 
Robert Crogan. 

Second row, left to right. Perry 
Sethaler, Delbert Shockey, H. V. 
Cochran, Eden Di Tiillio, John Rilko, 
Forest Huff, Stewart Moore, and 
Max Martinez. 

Third row, Robert Litke, Harry 
Wetzel, Alfred Becker, Doyle Fayles, 
Glen Evans, Ed Harritt, Marvin 
Nitengale, Marshall Blanchard, W. 
A. Homrighausen, Wilfred Mumford, 
Henry Dierks, William H. Benns, 
Roy Barnhill, and Doyle Green. 

PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

At a special awards night held by 
Local 921, 21 members were 
honored for their long and faithful 
service to the Brotherhood with 
presentation of 25-year pins by 
International Representative John F. 
Burns. Seated, from left to right, 
is Everett W. Bennett, Jr., Alexander 
Perreault, Norman L. Hartford, 
Francis R. Butler, Frank R. Allen, 
Joseph Boucher. Standing, from 
left to right, Willard J. Hodge, 
William E. Pinkham, Richard F. 
Racicot, Charles H. Fall, Norman 
W. Towle, Edward J. Welch, John 
N. Schoch, Frank D. Gillespie, 
Saverio M. Giambalvo and Int. 
Rep. John F. Burns. Not present 
were Everett W. Beede, Ralph 
Dunlop, David A. Phillips, Charles 
H. Remick, Roland L. Sylvester 
and George G. Towle. 




LYNN, MASS. 

Hari-y Ohlson, former business representative of Local 595, was honored 
during a recent testimonial dinner at the Kowloon Restaurant in Saugus, 
Mass. Members with 25 years of service were also honored. Seated, from 

left, Edwin Sidlivan, Elmo E. Landry and Theron Johnson, financial 
secretary. Standing, from left, Richard P. Griffin, International Representative; 
Harry Ohlson, former business representative; Walter Miclialchuk; Harvey 
Bray, Toastmaster; William Kiernan; Joseph C. Blinn; Edward DiPietro; 
wd Wilfred Leach, president. 



PORTSMOUTH, N.H. 




24 



THE CARPENTER 




GOSSIP 



SEND YOUR FAVORITES TO: 

PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONSTITUTION 

AVE. NW, WASH., D.C. 20001. 

SORRY, BUT NO PAYMENT MADE 

AND POETRY NOT ACCEPTED. 

A Batter Education 

Who says kids don't learn anything 
from television? Nowadays when a 
teacher asks a first grader what one 
and one are, chances are the kid 
answers: "One ball and a strike!" — 
Frank Myslivecek, L.U. 15, Hacken- 
sack, N.J. 

R U REGISTERED 2 VOTE? 




Not An Easy Choice 

After he had finished examining his 
old friend, the doctor said: "Charley, 
I can't find much wrong with you. 
I'd recommend, however, that you cut 
out about half of your love-life. " 

"That's okay with me," replied the 
oldster. "Which half would you sug- 
gest; the talking about it or the think- 
ing about it?" 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 

Grave Problem 

The wife knew she had only a few 
hours to live. She called her husband 
to the bedside and said: "I know you 
and mother have never gotten along. 
But, as a special favor to me, prom- 
ise that you'll ride to the cemetery 
with her!" 

The husband reluctantly replied: 
"Well, all right . . . but it's gonna 
spoil my whole day!" 




Mr. Pert Sez: 

It's smart to never give first im- 
pressions a second thought. 

The fastest way to rise above the 
crowd is to buy a pair of elevator 
shoes. 

UNIONISM STARTS WITH "U" 

No Cause for Alarm 

The family had moved into a new 
neighborhood. Shortly thereafter the 
six-year-old daughter announced to 
her mother that the little boy next 
door wanted to know where she came 
from. "And what did you tell him?" 
the mother asked with apprehension. 

"I told him the truth," replied the 
little qirl, "that I came from Pitts- 
burgh!" 
UNION DUES-TOMORROWS SECURITY 

Medically Relieved 

"I have a confession to make," 
shyly said the new bride to her groom 
at their first breakfast together. "I 
suffer from chronic asthma." 

"Thank heaven!" exclaimed her 
new husband. "Last night I thought 
you were hissing me!" 

1 4 ALL-ALL 4 1 

Horse /Maneuvers 

The old cowhand surveyed the 
dude and laughed, "How come you're 
only wearing one spur, pardner?" 

And the dude replied, "I believe 
If one side of the horse Is put into 
gear with that spur, the other side 
of the horse will follow." 



This /Month's Limerick 

There once was a hip crocodile 
Who grinned as he'd walk down an 

aisle. 

They said he was weird 

'Cause he w^ore a long beard, 
But when called "Beaver!" he'd tooth- 

Ily smile! — Mary Qualne, War- 
wick, R.I. 



Scrambled Facts 

It Is better that things go In one 
ear and come out the other than It 
Is that they go In one ear, get scram- 
bled between the ears, and come out 
of the mouth. 

WORK SAFELY-ACCIDENTS HURT 

Some Stool Pigeon! 

The old maid had called the police 
to complain that the man In the 
apartment across the air shaft left 
his windowshades open and walked 
around in the nude. The policeman 
answering her call looked over the 
situation and then replied: 

"Lady, it's obvious that you 
couldn't possibly be offended. Why, 
from your window, you can't even 
see the man's head!" 

"Oh yeah?" oh-yeahed the little 
old lady, "You didn't stand on the 
stool!" 

UNION-MADE IS WELL-MADE 




One Reason for Long Hair 

The delicate young man with 
shoulder-length tresses was worried 
about his girl friend's father's pos- 
sible reaction to him dating the 
daughter so often. 

"Don't be silly!" reassured his girl 
friend. "Daddy doesn't mind us be- 
ing alone together. He thinks you're 
another girl!" 

ALWAYS C D UNION LABEL 



Not Out-maneuvered 

Blonde: "I'd like to see the cap- 
tain of this ship." 

Steward: "He's forward, ma'am." 
Blonde: "So what? I still want to 
see him!" 

R U COIN 2 D UNION MEETING.' 



And Gave Her Awl? 

She was only a carpenter's daugh- 
ter, but It was plane to see she was 
completely on the level! — John Free- 
ma'n, San Francisco, Local 22. 



MARCH, 1973 



25 




LOCAL UNION NEWS 



Local 225 Member, 
Council Coordinator 

The AFL-CIO Appalachian Council at 
Charleston, W. Va., has announced the 
appointment of David Wayne Carroll of 
Atlanta, Ga., as council field coordinator 
for the State of Georgia. Carroll, 26, is 
a graduate of Roosevelt High School and 
attended West Georgia College in Car- 
rollton. 

The council is a labor-administered, 
Federally- funded, manpower-training 
program operating in 12 states from 
Pennsylvania through Mississippi. Work- 
er-training programs involve cooperation 
among labor, industry, the U. S. Dept. 
of Labor, the U. S. Dept. of Health, 
Education and Welfare, and local Em- 
ployment Security offices. Carroll's du- 
ties include job development, the struc- 
turing of training programs, and liaison 
work among employers, employees, and 
other parties involved. 

Carroll is a member of Local 225 in 
Atlanta. 



Oldest West Coast Local Marks 90tli Year 







Local 35 of San Rafael, Calif., held a 90th Anniversary Banquet last year. The 
local union is justly proud of its record as the oldest local union of Carpenters con- 
tinuously in existence on the West Coast and the 10th oldest in the United States. 
Among the celebrants, left to right, were: Wayne Coen, Guido Mariani, Ray Good- 
ness. L. L. Pat Miller, Roby Thomas, Willard Scovill, Francis Baptisto, Mile Andrews, 
and Charles Rentz. 

Members and Officers of Local 512 



WORKING DAZE 




"Boy, there's a gal I could really 
fall for!" 



NATIONAL SAFETV COUNCIl 






MfimlwTs aoid oltifers of Locul 512, "i psilanti, Mich., were photographed at an awards 
banquet held recently. Shown in the picture, front row: Lawrence Gorton, Clyde 
Clark, Robert E. Harrison, and Lige Hoskins, business representative. Back row: 
Anthony (Pete) Ochocki, 3rd District Representative, John W. Martin, local president; 
Carl Brumbaugh, William LaVoie, F. Ray Gilbert, business representative, Theodore 
Fordyce, Leiland Terwilliger, Willard Bredernitz, Leonard B. Zimmerman, General 
Representative. 



The Dorze people of Ethiopia believe 
that well-fed builders erect better houses, 
National Geographic says. While one of 
their thatch-and-bamboo huts is under 
construction, they ply the craftsmen with 
delicacies. 



NOTE TO CORRESPONDENTS: When sending photographs to The Carpenter for 
publication be sure to identify everyone shown in group pictures, starting with the 
front row and reading from left to right. Please write as legibly as possible. Give 
local union and district council titles when appropriate. Please indicate if you would 
like to have certain photographs returned. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 




Concrete Constructors Form National Society 

Concrete-construction contractors from all over the United States assembled in San 
Diego, Calif., January 28-Febriiary 1, to erect forms for the American Society of 
Concrete Constructors — a new management group interested in the advancement and 
promotion of cast-in-place and precast concrete. The conference explored problems 
facing the industry today and placed strong emphasis on labor-management relations. 

John Rogers of the Carpenters second from left above, was a panelist with John 
Hauck, secretary-treasurer of the Plasterers and Cement Masons, William Dixon of 
the Laborers, and others on the subject of labor-management relations. 

Those shown in the picture above are: Gerald Crisimo, contractor representative of 
Youngstown, O.; Rogers; Dixon; and Harry Martinez, vice president of the Plasterers 
and Cement Masons. 



Several Remember 
The Water Wheel 

We have had several enthusiastic re- 
sponses to our advertisement in the 
January issue of The Carpenter request- 
ing someone to build a model of the 
original Waterwheel-Powered Grist Mill. 
However, the first offer came from the 
School of Central and Western Indiana 
Carpenters' Joint Apprenticeship Com- 
mittee, and we accepted it. 

The Apprenticeship Department of the 
U.B.C. & J. of A. would like to thank 
each of the following who offered to 
build a model of the Waterwheel: 

Franklin Davis, Miami, Florida 

Kelly Donato, Warren, Rhode Island 

Clarence Halcomb, Local Union 637, 
Hamilton, Ohio 

Edgar E. Helsby, Local Union 36, 
Oakland, California 

William Kudler, Local Union 359, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Walter I. Noll, Local Union 1497, 
East Los Angeles, California 

A. C. Payne, Local Union 55, Denver, 
Colorado 

John W. Sandberg, Local Union 15, 
Hackensack, New Jersey 



Protecting America offers|two opportunities foisa real future 




ORVILLE PIERCE 
(LaPuenle, Calil.) 
■'While in Ifaining I 
earned J200 and I now 
tiavc a mobile 
whtch I operate 




spar 



tir 



en 



joyed Ihe course and 
Ihink It was the bes' 
instruction one can gel 
in this field ■■ 



HORACE H. ALBRIGHr 
(Brookhaven. Miss.) 
"... average about 
$4.00 per hour. 1 think 
the whole course was 
the greatest, the best 
instructor and when I 
retire ... am going lo 
do locksmith work full 
time. Thank you." 



W. M RAGSOALE 
(Conyers Ga ) I think 
the Locksmithing Insli' 
tute IS doing a Ime |ob 
training people tor the 
locksmithing trade. I 
now do all Ihe lock re- 
pair fo( the County High 
School, with a pleasing 
increase m salary." 



OCKSMITH 




Newspaper headlines tell the story. 

Pick up a paper any day. Burglary, house- 
breaking, vandalized fiomes - — no wonder 
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fore And there are moreTiomes, more -stores 
and factories, more hotels, more cars, and 
more people. And that means more keys 
and locks. 

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From the start you get practical experience 
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e. 
Don't you owe it to yourself to get the facts 
today? The card below won't even cost you 
postage No salesman will call. You and you 
"' "" - - -■ - decision based on the 





•^ Earn as much as $10 an hour — or more. 

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write his own ticket. Earn as much as he 
wants to work, Earn in his spare time, in a 
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position with someone else, Earn in almost 
any part of the country he wishes to live. 

Learn at home — earn as you learn. 

Let Locksmithing Institute show you abso- 
lutely free how you can qualify for this en 
citing, action field. The information card 
below will bring you full details about the 
fast, easy course that trains you by "doing" 
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can learn at home, in your spare time, even 
while you hold down your present job. See 
how Ihe key-making machine and complete 
set of tools included with the course can 
put you in business earning money right 
while you are learning. 




LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE 

Division of Technical Home Study Schools 
Dept. 1118-033, Little Falls, New Jersey 07424 



> MAIL COUPON TODAY! No Salesman will col 



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A rocent FBI crime roporl showed that a 
burglary is being coramlttcd every 15 
s-'condfl in the UnitL-d Stntcs. Right now, 
one of the most rapidly-expanding indus- 
trii-s in thL' U.S.A. ia thu home and busint-sa 
sd'curity field. As crime increases, demand 
for home and business protection expands 
with it. The need has never been greater. 

Yet, surprisingly, you need no particular 
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edge. Alarm systems operate on very low 
voHagea which are not dangerous and do not 
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Train in your own home, at the hours 
you choose. Leasona— ckarly written for 
study at home — cover all types of installa- 
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For full information on all the opportuni- 
ties in this expanding fiild, mail coupon 
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SECURITY SYSTEMS 
MANAGEMENT SCHOOLS 

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-Zip- 



MARCH, 1973 



27 




PailfflU 




000 



. . . those members of our Brotherhood who. in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to pubHc oifices. have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "stood 
out from the crowd." This month, our editorial hat is off to the following: 



PUBLIC SERVICE AWARD— Carl Reiter. re- 
tired assistant executive secretary of the 
Carpenters" District Council of Greater 
St. Louis, was honored February 19 by 
the Home Builders Association of 
Greater St. Louis with their coveted 
"Public Service Award." 

One of the guest speakers at the spe- 
cial dinner honoring Reiter. Globe- 
Democrat financial editor Ted Shafers, 
also cited the Carpenters' District Coun- 
cil, its members and leadership, as one 
of the community's outstanding labor 
organizations. 

Leonard Keim. president of the St. 
Louis Home Builders Association, in 
presenting the award to Reiter. toid the 
storj' of how, as a new, young builder, 
he had had a "run in" with Carl Reiter 
after he was on his new job only a few 
weeks. 

"That was my first introduction to 
anyone in organized labor,'' Keim said, 
"and since that day I have measured 
every labor man I meet by the standards 
Carl Reiter set." 

Another builder, in introductory re- 
marks for one of the two guest speakers, 
stopped in his introduction to comment 
that all the home builders haie had a 
fine relationship with Carl Reiter and 
the entire Carpenters' organization. "If 
we had the same relationship with all 
the unions as we have with the carpen- 
ters, we would all be a lot happier,"' 
he said. 

UNITED FUND AWARDS— The Carpenters' 
District Council of Greater St. Louis, 
Mo. was singled out for plaudits at the 
St. Louis United Fund Campaign 
Awards Luncheon held in St. Louis re- 
cently. 

The Council was praised for achiev- 
ing its "Fair Share Goal," while Ollie 
Langhorst. executive secretary-treasurer, 
was cited for his role as co-chairman of 
the Construction and Building Trades 
Division of the fund drive. Under his 
leadership and that of co-chairman Fred 
Weber, president of the Fred Weber 
Construction Co., St. Louis, the Con- 
struction and Building Trades Division 
exceeded its goal by 121 percent. 



The Council and its staff worked 
throughout the agency's annual month- 
long campaign last fall to help the 
United Fund raise almost S14 million, 
which was 101 percent of the campaign's 
goal. The St. Louis United Fund serves 
over 100 community agencies. 



POLITICAL BOOSTER— Marvin E. Taylor, 
business representative of Local 387, 
Columbus, Miss., for the past 22 years, 
has been a political "activist" in his sec- 
tion of the Deep South. 

As area chairman for the AFL-CIO 
Committee on Political Education dur- 
ing the general elections, last November, 
Taylor led his group of union political 
workers through several successful cam- 
paigns in the Second Congressional Dis- 
trict of Mississippi. The district fielded 
nine Democratic candidates for Con- 
gress, plus one Republican and one In- 
dependent. The COPE committee inter- 
viewed the candidates and recommended 
David Bowen. It then worked hard for 
his successful election to the 93rd Con- 
gress. The Second District stretches 
from the Alabama line to the Mississippi 
River, comprising 16 counties. Bowen 
won every one by a 2 to 1 margin. 

Taylor has been vice president of the 
Mississippi AFL-CIO for 10 years and 
president of his building trades council 
for 12 years. 




Leonard Keim, Home Builders president, eighth from left, presents the St. Louis 
Home Builders' award to Reiter. .4mong the several hundred guests at the dinner 
meeting February 19, were Mrs. Reiter. Ollie Langhorst. the District Council's chief 
executive officer, seventh from left, the staff of the Carpenter's District Council and 
Floor Layers Local 1310. 



UNITED FUNDI 





Expressing the thanks of organized labor for their outstanding support of the St. 
Louis United Fund are Greater St. Louis Labor Council officers, Secretarj -Treas- 
urer James Meyers (8th from left) and President Oscar Ehrhardt (12th from left) 
congratulating Council Executive Secretarj -Treasurer Ollie Langhorst. Also present 
at the "thank you" luncheon were Council staff members, from left. Director of Or- 
ganizing Bill Field, Floor Layers Local 1310 Business Representative Joe Pijut, 
Council Representatives Larrj Daniels (Director of Jurisdictional Research). Fred 
Redell, Leonard Terbrock. Don Brussel, Ed Thien, (Meyers. Langhorst), Assistant 
Executive Secretarj -Treasurer Pleas Jenkins, Jim Rudolph, (Ehrhardt), Pat Sweeney, 
Hermann Henke, retired Financial Secretarj Irv Meinert and .Mike Heilich. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



Swearing-Iii Oak 




The Brotherhood's Soulhwcst Organiz- 
ing Director, Gervis Simmons, Jr., is 
dwarfed by this giant willow oak, largest 
living specimen on record in Texas. It 
stands 90 feet high near the National 
Homes Mobile Home Plant at Owen- 
town, Tex., near Tyler. Many members 
of Local 2863 employed by National 
Homes have been sworn into the Brother- 
hood beneath this giant tree, according 
to Simmons. 



LEARN 

from 
NEW BOOKS 

STAIRWAY CONSTRUCTION 




$3.50 



Even with no previous experiencp you will be able 
to build a good stair the first time. Complete detailfd 
instructions are given on how to lay out. cut and build 
various types of stairs. It saves its cost on the first stair 
you builii- 

HOUSE CONSTRUCTION DETAILS $14.95 V 

A large book with 2500 illustrations. Every step in 
house construction is explained and illustrated. Exact 
working guide to every detail from foundation to finish. 
Conforms to modern practice and building regula- 
tions in all parts of the country. 

MODERN CARPENTRY $7.96 □ 

This big book of 492 pages and 1400 illustrations 
gives detailed information on all aspects of construction 
from foundation to completed house. It contains basic 
instruction for the apprentice and is a fine reference book 
for the experiencei! carpenter. 

WRITE FOR FREE CATALOG— many books, 
tools, and other items. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 

Full refund if tiook is returned in 10 days. All items 
postpaid. Washington state residents add sales tax. 
Send check or money order to: 

DOUGLAS FUGin ENTERPRISES 

11347 N.E. 124th St., Kirlcland, Wash. 98033 



ORDER TODAY 

Name 

Address 

City 

State Zip Code 



Need More Money? Want to Be Your Own Boss? 

Start Saw Sharpening 

AxBusiness Of Your Own 



, .af4^» 



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Vou can sharpen con.binaUon^^.P 
and crosscut) cufcma^^ ^^^^^^^^ 
saws, hand f;"^' " feet job every 
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IrTining The precis on^rol^^Uy'. A 
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IN YOUR SPARETIME 



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^ practical way — start your 

* own money-making sharp- 

ening business — No selling 
or canvassing — No experi- 
ence required. You can do it 
automatically with Foley Saw 
Filer orLawnM o wer Sharpener. 

Beginners EARN 
^3 to '6 an Hour 

People, just like yourself, all over the 
United States are making extra cash^ 
.$20 to .$30 a week — right now in their 
spare time. "My sparetime saw filing busi- 
ness has made me $952 these first ten 
months," says R. T. Chapman. Many 
start part-time, find it so profitable that 
they build year-round service business. 
You can, too, simply by following easy 
Foley plan. 

Town of 150 Supports 
Profitable Business... 

Here's the story from Dick and Jo Ann Koester 

after being in business less tban a year. "We 

have acquired another Foley Saw Filer and for 

the past two months we have been in full-Lime 

operation. As we live in a small town of 150 

population in farm area we use our ti-uck to 

pick up saws in five nearby towns. With a 

family to support and plans for building to 

our house we had to pick up a business fast 

and already sharpen an average of 15-20 

saws a day. Business for the future looks even 

belter as good machine filing is our best 

advertising." 

CASH for Sharpening 



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Booklet Tells How! 

Free Book "Money Making 
Facts" shows just how you 
can start at home in spare 
time. Small investment — 
time payments if desired. 
Get this booklet — study it! 
Send coupon today. No 
salesman will call on you. 



Mowers 



Every neighbor 
with a lawn needs 
his lawn mower 
sharpened at least 
once a year. No 
experience is 
needed to start — 
anyone can oj:*-''^ 
erate and turn 
out professional 
jobs. All opera- 
tions are handled 
(juickly, easily 
and accurately. 




Foley Manufacturing Co., 318-3 Foley BIdg. 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55418 

Send Free Booklet on Z^ Saw Sharpening Business 
□ Lav;n Mower Sharpening 

Name 



City_ 



_State_ 



_Zipcode_ 







Minority Ratio 
At Ail-Time High 

Minority groups' participation in the 
skilled construction crafts is at an all- 
time high with 8.1 percent of the crafts- 
men now coming from such groups, 
the AFL-CIO Building and Construc- 
tion Trades Department announced here. 

A report made to the Department's 
executive council meeting here by a 
Joint Apprenticeship Committee of the 
Department and the AFL-CIO Metal 
Trades Department showed that 13.2 
percent of all Federally-registered ap- 
prentices in the construction trades are 
non-white. 

Secretary-Treasurer David Turner of 
the Sheet Metal Workers and Reese 
Hammond, research director of the Op- 
erating Engineers, who made the report 
on behalf of the committee, said that 
there currently are about 265.000 non- 
whites among construction craftsmen. 

Building trades unions and minority 
groups, they said, have increased non- 
white participation in construction ap- 
prentice programs by 56 percent in the 
three years since BCTD adopted a spe- 
cific program to open up new oppor- 
tunities for minorities. 

The report also showed that youths 
from minority groups are being brought 
into apprentice training at an increasing 
pace. In the first half of 1972, 20 per- 
cent of all apprentices enrolled in the 
building trades came from minority 
groups. 

Turner and Hammond also emphasized 
that an overall ten percent growth in 
the number of non-whites in the con- 
struction trades in the past three years 
occurred during the period when con- 
struction unemployment was running at 
a high rate of about ten percent an- 
nually. 

The report reviewed a number of in- 
dividual minority-hiring programs. It 
noted that a two-year-old Journeyman 
Outreach program is now active in 72 
cities. An older Apprenticeship Out- 
reach program, it said, is in operation 
in 116 cities. 

However, the Joint Apprenticeship 
Committee made it clear that progress 
in minority hiring does not justify any 
resting on laurels. 



Graduating Apprentices In Clifton Heights 




Graduating apprentices of Local 845, Clifton Heights, Pa., were presented a gift 
check in honor of their achievement. Happy recipients are shown above. Left to 
right: Joseph Seefeldt, business representative; Douglas Quigg, financial secretary; 
Graduate Joseph Clark; Award Night Chairman Thomas Moran; Graduates Robert 
Spangler and Frederick Rode; Richard O'Driscoll, assistant supervisor of the Carpen- 
ters Health and Welfare Fund of Philadelphia and Vicinity-; and Graduate Cacell 
Braxton. 

Not pictured, but receiving checks were: James Grundy, Anthony lannucci, Richard 
Izzo, Michael Keenan, Kenneth Laudadio, Charles McCatferty, James Quinn, Joseph 
Manely, and Robert Walker. 



Chain Saw Safety' 
Is Company Film 

"Chain Saw Safety", a 2I-minute color 
motion picture, is now available for loan 
from McCuUoch Corp., a leading manu- 
facturer of chain saws. 

The film was produced because of the 
manufacturer's recognition of its respon- 
sibility for training in safe, efficient use 
of its products, according to Will Rusch, 
administrator, public affairs. 

Produced for McCulloch by Motion 
Pictures for Industry, Pasadena, Calif., 
"Chain Saw Safety" is the newest film 
of its kind in the industry. 

In addition to its emphasis on safe 
operation of chain saws, the film illus- 
trates proper handling of the tools for 
increased production and the avoidance 
of work environment hazards to the 
chain saw operator. 

The film was produced with the inten- 
tion of being of interest and instructional 
benefit to professional chain saw users 
and to those who have never used the 
tools, as well. 



"Chain Saw Safety" applies to all 
phases of chain saw user training, includ- 
ing logging, heavy construction, tree 
maintenance, forestry and pulpwood pro- 
duction. 

It also underlines the bounty of trees 
as a multiple-use, renewable natural re- 
source. 

Rusch has invited prospective viewers 
of "Chain Saw Safety" to contact him 
at McCulloch Corp., 6101 W. Century 
Blvd., Los Angeles, Ca. 90045. 

Minimum Goal 

For Vet Placements 

The Labor Department has set a mini- 
mum goal of 1.4 million jobs and train- 
ing placements for Vietnam-era veterans 
for fiscal year 1973. Last year the De- 
partment found jobs or training slots for 
1.3 million veterans, exceeding the goal 
by 30 percent. About 600,000 men and 
women are expected to be discharged 
from service this fiscal year. 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



APPRENTICESHIP CONTESTS 
CALENDAR, FEBRUARY, 1973 

We are pleased to have received noti- 
fication from the following states and 
provinces of their intent to participate in 
the 1973 International Carpenters Ap- 
prenticeship Contest. This is, of course, 
only a partial listing and is subject to 
change. This calendar will appear in The 
Carpenter each month, showing addi- 
tional states and provinces and also 
changes or additions in the categories in 
which contestants will he entered. 







Mill 




State Carpenter 


Cabinet 


Milinright 


Alabama 


X 






(April 27-28) 








Alaska 


X 






Arizona 


X 




X 


(written test, 


April 9 


16: man 


pulative, 


May 26) 








California 


X 


X 


X 


(June 21-22-2 


3) 






Colorado 


X 


X 


X 


Connecticut 


X 






Delaware 


X 






Dist. of Col. 








& Vic. 


X 


X 


X 


Florida 


X 




X 


(May 10-11-1 


2) 






Idaho 


X 






(May 4-5) 








Illinois 


X 


X 


X 


(May 23-24) 








Indiana 


X 


X 


X 


Iowa 


X 


X 


X 


Kansas 


X 




X 


Louisiana 


X 




X 


Maryland 


X 


X 


X 


Massachusetts 


X 


X 


X 


(May 18-19) 








Michigan 


X 




X 


Minnesota 


X 






Missouri 


X 


X 


X 


(May 16-17) 








Nebraska 


X 




X 


Nevada 


X 






New Jersey 


X 


X 


X 


New York 


X 


X 


X 


(June 4-5-6) 








Ohio 


X 


X 


X 


(May 16-17) 








Oklahoma 


X 


X 


X 


Oregon 


X 


X 


X 


Pennsylvania 


X 


X 


X 


Rhode Island 


X 


X 




Tennessee 


X 




X 


(May 4-5) 








Texas 


X 


X 


X 


(April 26-27) 








Utah 


X 






Virginia 


X 






Washington 


X 


X 


X 


West Virginia 


X 




X 


Wisconsin 


X 






Wyoming 


X 




X 


British Col. 








(Can.) 


X 


X 




Manitoba, Winn. 






(Can.) 


X 






Ontario (Can.) 


X 




X 



Total 



40 



19 



27 




These 

FREE BLUE PRINTS 

have started thousands toward 

BETTER PAY AND PROMOTION 



That's right! Men who sent for these free 
blue prints are today enjoying big success 
as foremen, superintendents and building 
contractors. They've landed these higher- 
paying jobs because they learned to read 
blue prints and mastered the practical de- 
tails of construction. Now CTC home- 
study training in building offers you the 
same opportunity, at a cost of about 
$3.00 a week! 



LEARN IN YOUR SPARE TIME 

As you know, the ability to read blue 
prints accurately determines to a great 
extent how far you can go in building. 
What's more, you can learn plan reading 
with the Chicago Tech system of spare- 
time training in your own home. The trial 
lesson will show you how. You also learn 
all phases of building, prepare yourself to 
run the job from start to finish. 



CASH IN ON YOUR EXPERIENCE 

Since 1904 building tradesmen and be- 
ginners alike have won higher pay with 
the knowledge gained from Chicago Tech's 
program in blue print reading, estimating, 
foremanship and contracting. Through 
step-by-step instruction, using actual blue 
prints and real specifications of modem, 
up-to-date buildings, you get a practical 
working knowledge of every building de- 
tail — a thorough understanding of every 
craft. And as a carpenter or apprentice, 
you already have valuable experience that 
may let you move up to foreman even 
before you complete your training. 

Don't waste a single day. Start prepar- 
ing right now to take over a better job, 
increase your paycheck and command 
greater respect as the "boss" on the job. 
Find out about Chicago Tech's get-ahead 
training in building. Send for your free 
blue prints and trial lesson — today! 



APPROVED FOR VETERANS 



CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE 

TECH BLDG., 2000 MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO, ILL. 60616 

I 



FREE 

BLUE PRINTS 

AND 
TRIAL LESSON 

Send for your free trial 
lesson now. See how sim- 
ple it is to learn blue print 
reading the CTC way. All 
information sent by mail. 
No salesman will call. 

MAIL COUPON TODAY 



Chicago Technical College New G.I. Bill] I | 

C-145 Tech BIdg., 2000 S. Michigan Vefs check here | | 

Chicago, Illinois 60616 

Please mail me Free Trial Lesson, Blue prints and Catalog. 
I understand there is no obligation — no salesman will call. 



Name _ 



.Age. 



Address, 



Citv. 



. State _ 



. Zip . 



Occupation _ 



MARCH, 1973 



31 



KEEP YOUR CUTTING TOOLS SHARP 

Tips on the Proper Grinding of Cold Chisels, Punches and Axes 



■ Every do-it-yourselfer as well 
as the professional mechanic will at 
some time use a cold chisel, punch 
or star drill in some non-woodwork- 
ing operation. Too often the cut- 
ting edge is dull and/or chipped 
and, in the case of hand punches, 
the point is chipped or out of 
square with the axis of the tool. 
Such tools are not only inefficient 
but can be dangerous to the user. 

The angle and thickness of the 
cutting edges of tools are designed 
to give maximum cut and durability. 
Here are the basic rules which ap- 
ply to the grinding of all tools: 

1. The tool must be returned to 
its original shape. 

2. All cracks and spalls must be 
removed. 

3. The grinding temperature 
must be kept low. 

4. A medium or fine grit wheel 
should be used. 

5. Wheel direction should al- 
ways be away from the cut- 
ting edge towards the body of 
the tool. This positioning of 
the tool directs heat travel 
away from the cutting edge. 

Always wear safety goggles to 
protect your eyes. 

The average user may want to 
refer to a new tool to determine the 
original shape, and should remem- 
ber that many cracks cannot be 
seen by the naked eye. If the grind- 
ing temperature is not controlled, 
the hardness can be taken out of 
the area immediately around that 
which is being ground; more im- 
portantly, a hard, brittle surface 
(untempered martensite) can be set 
up which is very susceptible to frac- 
ture. 





Diomond Point 



Cold chisels are generally hard- 
ened about 1 Vi inches b^ck from 
the cutting edge and about % inch 
back from the head. Grinding 
should be kept well within these 
limits. The correct bevel may vary 
from an included angle of 55 to 90 
degrees, depending upon the mate- 
rial to be chiselled. For all-around 
use, 70 degrees is a good compro- 
mise; for soft metal, as low as 55 
degrees; for hard steel, as high as 
90 degrees. 





Always look for the Brotherhood's union 
label on tools, equipment, and products 
of the trade. Negotiate a union label 
clause in your next contract. 



When sharpening, the chisel 
should be held at the desired angle 
and moved across the face of the 
wheel. Pressure of the chisel against 
the wheel must not be strong 
enough to overheat and draw the 
temper from the chisel. The facet 
should be uniform and straight back 
from the cutting edge, but slightly 
convex across the width of the 
chisel. Dip in water frequently to 
avoid overheating. 

Other commonly used metal- 
working chisels are Round Nose, 
Diamond Point and Cape. Sharpen- 
ing instructions are the same as for 
flat cold chisels except that bevel 
angles are as illustrated. 



The working end of pin and rivet 
punches and blacksmiths' backing 
out punches should be ground flat 
and square with the axis of the tool. 
The point of center punches should 
be ground to an included angle of 
60 degrees; prick punches, to an 
included angle of 30 degrees. Ro- 
tate the tool when grinding a punch. 
Many householders have an axe or 
hatchet, and since the above sharp- 
ening instructions must be modified 
for these non-metalworking tools 
the following procedure should be 
followed: 

Grind slowly on a wheel kept 
very wet — Do Not Use A High 
Speed Drj' Grinding Wheel. Care- 
less grinding will ruin any axe either 
by destroying the temper through 
heat caused by friction or by mak- 
ing the edge too thin. If a file is 
used for sharpening, be sure that 
all scratches are removed with a 
whetstone or hone. When regrind- 
ing, start 2 or 3 inches back from 
the cutting edge and grind to about 
Vi inch from the edge. Sharpen the 
remaining Vi inch with a hone or 
whetstone. Work for a fan-shape, 
leaving reinforcement at corners for 
strength. See cross-section illustra- 
tions for the "right" and "wrong" 
ways to shape an axe edge in grind- 
ing. Double-bevel hatchets should 
be ground with a straight bevel as 
shown in "B". ■ 

































k 






A 


- 












\ 






/\ 




A 






\ 






\ 

c 


— 


/ 


\ 






\ 






\ 






B 




— 









A very comprehensive booklet, "Proper 
Uses and Common Abuses of Striking 
and Struck Tools." contains detailed shar- 
pening instructions. Copies may be ob- 
tained by sending twenty-five cents to 
Service Tools Institute, 331 Madison 
Aveiuie, New York. N.Y. 10017. 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



New Chevrolet . 
A very strong argument for replacing 

your old pickup. 




1973 Chevrolet Cheyenne Super Pickup 



A 73 Chevy pickup is loaded with 
strong arguments in its favor, and 
yours. There are new double-walled 
hood and fenders. The pickup box is 
specially primed. You get a roomy new 
cab, an easy new ride, authoritative 
new handling. Also on the standard 
eguipment list: power front disc brakes 
on ^A- and 1-ton models, rust-fighting 
full front wheelhousings, Load-Control 
rear leaf springs. Available: power 
steering, Turbo Hydra-matic, 4-wheel 
drive, a big new 454 V8 and a tough 
new dual-rear-wheel model (10,000 
lbs. GVW!). A 73 Chevrolet is so many 
ways improved, you have to drive 
one to believe it. Convince yourself 
at your Chevrolet dealer's now. 




Chevrolet 



Buildin g a better wa y to serve the U.S.A. 



-new comforts, and your own private quiet zone. 



Over 58% of Chevrolet's 1957 model trucks are still in use. No other 
make has even half, based on official industry records. Evidence of how 
well Chevrolets are designed. How well they're built. And how well they 
serve the U.S.A. 

c 
12 

o 











819% 


85 6% 


894% 


93 4% 
■ 


95 1% 
■ 


95 6% 
■ 


94 8% 
■ 


99 3%^ 

1 






74 2% 


74 7% 


■ 


■ 


■ 


■ 


■ 


■ 


■ 


■ 




65 7\ 


■ 


■ 


■ 


■ 


■ 


■ 


■ 


■ 


■ 


■ 


58 5% 

1 


59 8'. 

1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 

1957 


1 

■58 


1 

■59 


1 

•60 


1 

•61 


1 

62 


1 

63 


1 

•64 


1 

•65 


1 

■66 


1 

■67 


1 

68 


1 

1969 


Model Year 




















L Poih & Co 1 



The Cost of Living 

$ .28 1 mouse 

2.00 1 dozen tissue culture tubes 
6.00 100 disposable hypo- 
dermic needles 
7.00 1 gross of miaoscope slides 
15.00 Food and care of 1,500 

mice for 1 day 
20.00 1 dozen glass flasks for 

chemical studies 
25.00 6 months' supply of 

rubber gloves 
30.00 1 electric stirring motor 
45.00 Steam pressure sterilizer 
80.00 Laboratorj" flowmeter 
90.00 Blood cell calculator 
150.00 1 egg incubator 
180.00 Cost of culture medium for 
maintaining human tissue 
transplant for 1 year 
1 lead radiation shield 
1 instrument sterifeer 
Isotope scanner 
Mouth rebreathing ap- 
paratus and nebulizer 
1 microvolt ammeter 
Maintenance of 1 cancer 
patient in a research bed 
for 3 weeks 
Scholarship to tiain 1 
cytotechnologist 
2,000 millicuries of 
radioactive iodine 
50 units of human blood 
1 x-ray tube 
1 heart-lung machine 
Double beam giating 
spectrophotometer 
For development of radio- 
active d]-ugs which will 
destroy cancer cells with- 
out harming normal cells 
Gamma ray counter 
1 water phantom for 
radiation dosage studies 
1 half-gi'am of cobalt 60 
To identify industtial 
chemicals which may 
cause cancer in humans 
Preparative ultracentrifuge 
1 year's supply of Swiss- 
Webster mice for 1 
institute for use in chemo- 
therapy studies 
1 electron miaoscope 
For 1 grant to study the 
role of hormones in cancer 
1 high-voltage, total-body 
radiation insti'ument 
Salary support of 1 
research professor 
for a lifetime 
100 postdoctoral training 
fellowships for 1 year 
Expenditures for 1 year 
for a major cancer 
research center 



200.00 
200.00 
300.00 
350.00 

500.00 
600.00 

750.00 

1,000.00 

1,500.00 
2,800.00 
3,000.00 
4,000.00 

6,500.00 



8,000.00 
10,000.00 

10,000.00 
13,600.00 

15,000.00 
42,000.00 



50,000.00 
70,000.00 

125,000.00 

750,000.00 

900,000.00 
11,600,000.00 



When we first started asking 
for money for cancer research, 
more mice were being Oij-ed than 
people. 

But today, there are over 
one-and-a-half-milhon happy, 
healthy people walking around who 
are living proof that many cancers 
can be cured. 

And as long as research 
progress grows according to your 
dollars, we won't stop asking. 

Because our costs have truly 
become the cost of living. 

We want to wipe out cancer 
in your lifetime. Give to the ■, 
American Cancer Society. ^ 

"Hus space contributed by ihi: Publmher as a Public Service. 




DICTrONARY 

This is the 1 7th of a new feature series planned to keep you better 
informed on the meaning of terms related to collective bargaining, 
union contracts, and union business. Follow it closely, and your union 
membership will become more meaningful, and your ability to partici- 
pate in decisions which affect your future and security will be strength- 
ened. It was complied by the International Labor Press Assn., and is 
used with permission, 

s 

stoolpigeon: A man planted by the employer in a union to spy and 

report back. 
stoop labor: In agriculture, work requiring stooping, bending, 

kneeling. 
straight time: The wage rate paid for hours worked during the 

normal period prescribed by union contract or by law (see average 

straight-time earnings). 
strangers: Labor term for outsiders. 
straw boss: A group leader or assistant foreman, often one who has 

no formal title or permanent status. 
stretch-out: As used by management, a term for malingering; as 

used by labor, an increase in work without comparable increase 

in pay. 

strike: A concerted work stoppage, designed to pressure manage- 
ment to agree on contract terms, or to correct an unsettled griev- 
ance, or to recognize a union as collective bargaining agent. 

strike authorization: A strike vote which invests a designated group 
— union officers, executive board, negotiating committee, etc. — 
with the right to call a strike on a given issue. 

strike benefits: Payments by union to members on strike; a flat 
sum or graduated according to family needs, 

strikebreaker: A person who accepts employment in place of a 
striker, or organizes a back-to-work movement. 

strike notice: Formal notice to employer or appropriate government 
agency of impending walkout. 

strike vote: A decision, at a union membership meeting, by secret 
ballot or voice vote or show of hands, to determine whether to 
go on strike. The voting procedures in unions are now regulated 
by the Landrum-Griffin Act, 

struck work: Goods produced by strikebreakers; or goods produced 
by a firm not on strike, for the use or relief of a struck company. 

subcontracting: Work farmed out to another employer. If done to 
evade bargaining with a union, it is an unfair practice under federal 
law. 

subsistence allowance: Payment for such expenses as meals, hotel 
and transportation, while traveling for the employer. 

substandard rate: Rate below established plant or occupational 
minimum, federal or state minimum laws, or prevailing levels of 
wages in the area. 

superseniority: Seniority above length of service, for stewards, shop 
chairmen, etc. to insure their continued employment. 



34 



THE CARPENTER 



' \ ,,11 i ' t, ,f . l! 




# ill 1/ 
A J ill' ^' ' 



i 111 i i -I ! i ! 






m 

ill 1 )]s!Oir!'i.ii lUii 



lis n 



DOORS OVER CARPETS 




A handy device packaged for profes- 
sional carpet installers is currently avail- 
able. It's called "Hold-A-Door", and it 
installs easily and quickly as a guide for 
sliding doors, ending the problem of the 
alignment and positioning of sliding 
closet doors over a carpeted floor. 

Made especially for use on carpet, it 
replaces the typical block of wood solu- 
tion to the positioning of sliding closet 
doors with a system of precise adjust- 
ment to the thickness of any door and 
the variation in carpet tuft or other ir- 
regularities in the floor. 

Using wire cutters or pliers the legs 
of "Hold-A-Door" can be positioned into 
the carpet and fastened in place. No 
cutting of carpet or wood block build-up 
necessary. 

For further information contact: E-Z 
WAY HOME PRODUCTS. P. O. Box 
712, 12365 South 970 East. Draper, 
Utah 84020, (801) 571-4050. 

WALL FASTENER 

A new idea in wall fasteners has 
been introduced by Hollymatic Corpora- 
tion. Park Forest, III. The new .'\nchor- 
Matic (TM) com- 
bines nylon body 
with metal bolt 
and cross-bar pro- 
viding easy instal- 
lation and supe- 
rior holding pow- 
er. 

The nylon body 
with hollow shaft, 
including a metal 
cross-bar, is placed 
in a 5/16-inch pre- 
drilled or punched hole in panelling or 
wallboard without hammering. When 




the bolt is inserted and its end comes 
in contact with the horizontal cross-bar. 
it "rides" bevel, thus turning the cross- 
bar parallel to the wall. 

When the bar is parallel, the bolt end 
enters the threaded hole in its center, 
pushing the bar out of the molded niche 
it occupied when inserted. 

As the bolt is tightened, the cross-bar 
is drawn securely against the wall's inner 
surface. Unlike most metal fasteners, the 
Anchor-Matic can be removed as easily 
as it was installed. 

Two sizes are currently available: 
Type A for Vs to %-inch wall thickness; 
and Type B for ¥s to %-inch wallboard. 

Inquiries can be addressed to lohn 
Ittersagen, Special Products Manager, 
Hollymatic Corp., Park Forest, 111. 
60466. 

WASHER-FASTENER 

Sample packets containing a selection 
of eight different styles of its RaBott-' 
sealing washer-fastener combinations are 
available from El- 
co Industries, Inc., 
Rockford. III. 

No matter what 
the drive torque or 
angle of insertion, 
these washer-fas- 
tener combinations 
will seat properly 
and achieve effec- 
tive, long-lived 
sealing every time. 
The design key is 
the fastener head's 
convex underside 
or radial bottom that produces a ball- 
joint or swivel action on the mating 
washer for equal pressure distribution. 

Each RaBot sample has either a Vi- 
inch or ?8-inch metal and neoprene 
washer; the neoprene assures tougher 
service and greater resistance to ozone 
deterioration. When torqued, only a thin- 
line of neoprene shows, giving visual 
proof of proper seating. 

The hex washer-head samples are 
cadmium plated 0.0003 in. and include 
the following fastener sizes and point 
styles: With the '/2-inch RaBot washer — 
V4-14 X % No. 12 head, AB Tapping; 
12-14 X % AB Tapping: 12-14 x 1 Teks/ 
2; and 14-10 x 1 metal-to-wood screw. 
With the ?'8-inch RaBot washer — V4-14 
X % Teks/3; 12-14 x V-i Teks/3; 12-14 
X 1 Teks/2; and 12-14 x IVi Teks/3. 

RaBot is ideal for roofing applications 
and for securing sidewall and can be 
combined with self-drilling or tapping 
type fasteners to meet a variety of on- 
site tasks. 

For a sample packet of RaBot sealing 
washer combinations, write EIco Indus- 
tries. Inc.. 1 1 1 Samelson Road, Rockford. 
111. 61101. 



PLEASE NOTE: A report on new prod- 
ucts and processes on this page in no way 
constitutes an endorsement or recom- 
mendation. All performance claims are 
based on statements by the manufacturer. 




Planer- Molder- Saw! 




Now you can use this ONE power feed shop 
to turn rough lumber into high- value mold- 
ings, trim, flooring, furniture . . . ALL pop- 
ular patterns. 

RIP... PLANE... MOLD... separately or all 
at once by power feed . . . with a one horse- 
power motor. Use 3 to 5 HP for high speed 
coininercial output. 

LOW COST. . .You can own this money mak- 
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Send coupon today 
I 1 

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I. 943|y| Field BIdg., Kansas City, Mo. 64111 
I Send me complete tacts on the t^ULTI- 
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THE THIRD HIIHD 
0F1PIIHEUH6MIUI 



Take all llie guesswork out of aligning 
and marking corner panels with our kit 
ol rugged aluminum off-set jigs and 
marking gauges, 
increase your speed 
and accuracy as you 
scribe perlecl pan- 
els mari\(:d for a 
"presscdin" fil. 
I'unel IjypancI in- 
slriitlions inciuded 
for inside and out- 
side corners and tor 
llii: location ol cut- 
outs. Designed tor 
plyivood panels of 
' 1" or less. I'.ilonted U.S.A. 

OrrSEI JIGS FOR ROUTERS 

A Cutlii-Place method ol filtins; inside corner 
panels. Ttie router takes the place of the 
marking guage or scriber and precisely cuts 
over 90"i> of an 8 It. panel. Any router can be 
adapted lo these jigs. Cut-in- Place kits are 
designed lor plywood panels of ' 2 " or less. 
D Offset jigs and marking guages, 

59.9.5 Postpaid. 
D Cut-in-Place jigs for your router. 
S6.95 Postpaid. 
C.O.D. orders: you pay poslage and charge?, 
Salisfactjon gunraniccd or money refunded. 

For rush orders please add 50g 
PANELING SPECIALTIES CO. 
Three Lakes, Wisconsin 54562 




MARCH, 1973 



35 



MY SPARE TIME HOBBY 
MAKES ME , ^. 

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CASH PROFIT ^ 1 







START YOUR OWN SPARE TIME BUSINESS. 

You can turn your spare time into 
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Your Own Cash Business with no 
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while you are still working at your 
regular job. Low Cost - time pay- 
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733M Field BIdg. KansasCity, Mo. 64111 
Send details of FREE TRIAL OFFER and 
Free Book "Lifetime Security;' No obligation. 
Name 




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LAYOUT LEVEL 

• ACCURATE TO 1/32" 

• REACHES 100 FT. 

• ONE-MAN OPERATION 

Save Time, Money, do Better Job 
With This Modern Water Level 

In just a few minutes you accurately set batters 
for slabs and footings, lay out inside floors, 
ceilings, forms, fixtures, and check foundations 
for remodeling. 

HYDROLEVEL^ 

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level with modern features. Toolbox size. 
Durable 7" container with exclusive reser- 
voir, keeps level filled and ready. 50 ft. 
clear tough 3/10" tube gives you 100 ft. of 
leveling in each set-up, with 
1/32" accuracy and fast one- 
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obstructions. Anywhere you 
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Why waste money on delicate ^^9'^' 
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thousands of carpenters, builders, inside trades, 
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itself quickly. 

Send check or money order for §14.95 and 
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FIRST IN WATER LEVEL DESIGN SINCE 1950 

DESOTO TOOL COMPANY 

, P.O. Box C Ocean Springs, Miss. 39564 




Opponents of No-Fault Insurance 
Switch Tactics, State Bodies Told 



The AFL-CIO has alerted its state 
central bodies to a switch in tactics 
by opponents of no-fault auto insur- 
ance. 

Legislative Director Andrew J. Bie- 
miller said some of the principal foes 
of no-fault insurance, including the 
American Trial Lawyers Association 
and a segment of the insurance indus- 
try, will be pushing this year for pas- 
sage of "the weakest possible" state 
laws. 

Their intent, Biemiller wrote the 
state labor federations, is to head off 
passage of both federal legislation and 
strong state laws comparable to the 
labor-backed Hart-Magnuson bill in 
Congress. 

As a counter-measure, the AFL- 
CIO has sent to its state federations a 
four-page list of guidelines for effec- 
tive state no-fault auto insurance legis- 
lation. 

The key to reform, Biemiller 
stressed, is to separate compensation 
for auto accident victims as much as 
possible from the long and costly 
court procedure keyed to determina- 
tion of fault in the accident. 

Under the present fault system, 
legal expenses to both sides add heav- 
ily to the cost of auto insurance, vic- 
tims of serious accidents often collect 
far less than the amount of their eco- 
nomic loss and other persons with 
relatively minor losses may collect ex- 
cessive amounts in settlements. 

Among the guidelines the AFL-CIO 
proposed were: 

• Mandatory no-fault coverage for 
all motor vehicles registered in the 
state. 

• The insurance would cover losses 
sustained by the driver and his family. 
Passengers and pedestrians would be 
paid by their own insurance company 
if they are auto owners and thus cov- 
ered by the same type of insurance, 
or by the insurance covering the auto- 
mobile involved in the accident if 
they did not have a policy of their 
own. 

• Reimbursements for losses would 
cover all medical and rehabilitation 
costs, and either all wages lost during 
recuperation or wage losses up to 
$1,000 a month with those earning 
above that amount able to purchase 
optional coverage for the additional 
amount. 

• Death benefit coverage tied to 



36 



the wage formula based on years of 
earning potential remaining. 

• Compulsory liability insurance to 
protect drivers against claims up to 
$5,000 for damage to property other 
than another vehicle and a minimum 
$25,000 to protect the driver against 
loss claims arising out of a collision 
with a vehicle from a state without a 
no-fault system. 

• Optional insurance coverage 
which would provide no-fault pay- 
ment of collision and comprehensive 
coverage, subject to the existing sys- 
tem of deductibles, pain and suffering 
insurance, and liability beyond that 
required by state law. 

• Legal limitation on the right of 
an insurance company to seek through 
court action or arbitration to collect 
from other insurance companies. This 
restriction is intended to keep down 
legal and administrative costs which 
add to the high price of auto insur- 
ance. 

Other portions of the AFL-CIO 
guidelines deal with consumer protec- 
tion provisions, such as safeguards 
against arbitrary cancellation of poli- 
cies and a requirement that insurance 
firms pay accident losses within 30 
days of submission of proof of loss. 

The Senate Commerce Committee, 
meanwhile, has summoned representa- 
tives of insurance firms to testify re- 
garding a meeting held last December 
at the Camelback Inn in Phoenix, 
Ariz. 

Sen. Frank E. Moss (D-Utah), act- 
ing chairman for the hearings, charged 
that the companies targeted 1 states 
for a lobbying drive to enact mini- 
mum legislation and head off a federal 
law. 



Hels 

Back. 

Now Back The 

Disabled 

TETERAN 



1l3P,t::;.-.-.riCi-^ ■^■r,-Z'^-~, 



THE CARPENTER 




L.U. NO. 4 
DAVENPORT, IOWA 

Asmus, Virgil E. 
Kunkel, Wilbert M. 

L.U. NO. 11 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Wilkes, Paul 

L.U. NO. 12 
SYRACUSE, N.Y. 
Barrow, Robert E. 
Daniels, Edward 
O'Donnell, Charles 

L.U. NO. IS 
HACKENSACK, N.J. 

Hensch, Edward C. 
Sandman, Henry 
Sanowski, William 
Sonderfan, Peter 

L.U. NO. 31 
TRENTON, N.J. 

Geek, Frank 

L.U. NO. 34 
SAN FRANCISCO, 
CALIF. 

Bradshaw, Ben 
Bundy, Oril L. 
Frank, Chester A. 

L.U. NO. 35 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 

Casper, Adolph 
Morris, Raymond, Sr, 

L.U. NO. 37 
SHAMOKIN, PA. 

Vershinski, Peter 
Young, Dana H. 

L.U. NO. 44 
CHAMPAIGN, ILL. 

Bosley, Frank 
Crawford, Walter 
Ealey, Elmer 
Force, William 
Gogha, Fred 
Keagle, Samuel 

L.U. NO. 50 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Gilstrap, E. L, 
Wright, L. M. 

L.U. NO. 54 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Chakipa, Anton 
Sima, Marcelin 

L.U. NO. 55 
DENVER, COLO. 

Bayler, Fred S. 
Brooks, Dallas J. 
Pettit, Eugene H, 

L.U. NO. 61 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Dennis, Frank A. 
Howard, E. T. 
Provodnik. Charles 
Uhlig, Albert G. 



L.U. NO. 62 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Belanger, Edward 
Erickson, Carl 
Erickson, Herbert M. 
Johanson, John H. 
Johnson, Brynolf 
McMurray, Thomas 
Olson, Alge 
Ross, John 

L.U. NO. 69 
CANTON, OHIO 

Tamasovich, Edward 

I>.U. NO. 73 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Bogaski, George 
Busen, Floyd A. 
Katzman, Samuel 
Ruskus, Jack 
Toomey, Leo J. 
Weston, Charles O, 

L.U. NO. 74 
CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 

Duke, Jack M. 
Ferguson, Ernest E. 
McGarrity, S. M. 
Maxwell, Claude E. 
Vickery, Gus T. 

L.U. NO. 87 

ST. PAUL, MINN. 

Brozek, Albin 
Ciminski, Waller 
Johnson, Harold 
Pearson, Swan 
Richardson. Charles 
Skoglund, Richard 
Sterger, Alex 
Swanson, Albin 

L.U. NO. 90 
EVANSVILLE, IND. 

Baker, William R., Sr. 
Hale, Everett, Sr. 
Howard. Earl 
Mills, Clarence 
Nash, John 

L.U. NO. 101 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

McKenna, James J. 
Peters, Harvey U. 

L.U. NO. 106 

DES MOINES, IOWA 

Butler, Ray 

L.U. NO. 125 
UTICA, N.Y. 

Gates. Roy A. 
Martrulli, John 
Nemyier, William 
West, Walter D,, Jr. 

L.U. NO, 132 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Burner, V. E. 
Decatur, Herbert R. 
Hardester, Thomas 
Keys, Benton 

L.U. NO. 134 
MONTREAL, QUE. 

Delarosbil, Alexandre 



Demers, Paul Emile 
Duquay, Laurier 
Meloche, Adelme 
Pilon, Adrien 
St. Pierre, Rolland 

L.U. NO. 144 
MACON, GA. 

Hutchison, Clark 
Robinson, W. C. 
Smith, W, V. 

L.U. NO. 169 

EAST ST. LOUIS, ILL. 

Kanturek, Rudolph 
Powell, Edward L. 

L.U. NO. 181 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Bollenbach, Jacob 
Krause, Edward H., Sr. 
Turnwall, Arthur 

L.U. NO. 183 
PEORIA, ILL. 

Badgerow, Charles 
Bartholomew, H, E, 
Bekemeier, August F. 
Billerbeck, Henry 
Billmeyer, C. O. 
Blackhard, Charles 
Cecil, Everett C. 
Cramblett, Paul 
Geiger, Howard 
Genovese, Robert 
Heinz, George W. 
Keesecker, Louis R. 
King, Jesse G. 
Kunkel, John J., Jr. 
McCIain, George 
Miller, Michael 
Myers, James D. 
Niehaus, Roy 
Olson, Mauritz 
Pardue, Ernest 
Robbins, Elmer E. 
Schrier, Oscar 
Sheppard, Elmer 
Starts, S. P. 
Swinehart, James 
Westerfeld, Lester W. 
Wilkey, Frank O. 
Wood, Gus 

L.U. NO. 200 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Bayes, Elmer 

L.U. NO. 229 
GLENS FALLS, N.Y. 

Bartlett, Clayton 
Palmer, William 

L.U. NO, 243 
TIFFIN, OHIO 

Shutt, Owen 

L.U. NO. 246 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Sziklay, Julius 

L.U. NO. 278 
WATERTOWN, N.Y. 

Mooneyham, Clive G. 

L.U. NO. 301 
NEWBURGH, N.Y. 

Eignor, John P. 



L.U. NO. 314 
MADISON, WIS. 

Argue, Lincoln B. 
Bell, Ivan 
Haas, Donald H. 
Troy, Homer W. 

L.U. NO. 322 
NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y. 

Gombcrt, George A. 
Hennard, Lindzey 
Holbrook, Lawrence 
Smart, Robert 
Walke, Earl A. 

L.U. NO. 329 
OKLAHOMA CITY, 
OKLA. 

Adkins, D. F, 
Beitz, Elmer W. 
Blake, Sam 
Butler, Lawrence 
Campbell, A. J. 
Casey, B. F. 
Dyer, Lawrence 
Fisher, Robert R. 
Forrester. Arthur L. 
Godwin, Edward 
Leath, William O. 
McLeod, Kenneth 
Nagel, Paul 
Reagan, Alva 
Sleeper. Alva Earl 
Snelgro, C. C. 
Sorrels, A. E. 
Turner, Edward 
Whitten, I. T, 
Wilson, Bruce J. 

L.U. NO. 362 
PUEBLO, COLO. 

Mathews, Lester G. 
Samuelson, Everett G. 

L.U. NO. 385 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 

DeFranco, Dominic 
Fanelli, Edward 
Mosca, Eugene 
Naloli, James 

L.U. NO. 432 
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. 

Gunning. John 
Laniberd, Albert 
Mursheno, Jacob 
Marsh, John, Sr. 
Selesnick, Joseph 
Yalcs. Harry 

L.U. NO. 434 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Galica, Stanley 
Gertsen, Alfred 
Gribat, Albert R, 
Gura, John 
Klivickis. Albert 
Ligtvoel, Gerrit 
Stevens, James 
Thullen, Mathew 
Wail, William 

L.U. NO. 483 
SAN FRANCISCO, 
CALIF. 

Badock, Otto 
Bargaehr, Abraham 
Belk, B. M. 



Bellow, Edward 
Carlson, Dave Fred 
Carpenter, Homer T. 
Chester, J. G. 
Clifford, Paul 
Howell, Charles W. 
Linder, Norman G. 
Moore, Eric 
Nicolaisen, Milton 
Price, Alfred J. 
Ruebel, Joe F. 
Safholm, Robert 
Semsirg, Fred 
Valenta, Frank 

L.U. NO. 507 
NASHVILLE, TENN. 

Atkinson, Emmett D. 
Brittian, Claude I. 
Caruthers, Jasper 
Goode, Ernest K. 
Goodwin, Zack S. 
Grammer, Linza C. 
Green, John M. 
Halcomb, B. E. 
Hudgins, Joseph 
Lazenby, Thomas B. 
Nichols, Joseph M, 
Osborne, Argiel Lee 
Parker, Carl B. 
Pratt, O. L. 
Vandepool, John, Sr. 
Wales, Joseph 
Watson, Raymond V. 

L.U. NO. 545 
KANE, PA. 

Hallberg, Elmer G. 

L.U. NO. 558 
ELMHURST, ILL. 

Burger, Adam 
Tross, Ray 

L.U. NO. 562 
EVERETT. WASH. 

Berg, Christ 
Roberson, Harlan 

L.U. NO. 626 

NEW CASTLE, DEL. 

Cronshaw, Kennard W. 

L.U. NO. 630 
NEENAH and 

MENASHA, WIS. 

Lauer, William 

L.U. NO. 665 
AMARILLO, TEX. 

Billau. Frank 
Chappell, William A. 
Marable, S. L. 
Milligan, W. J, 
Taylor, D. K. 
Walters, Don L. 

L.U. NO. 668 

PALO ALTO, CALIF. 

Schoennauer, Daryl E. 

L.U. NO. 674 

MT. CLEMENS, MICH. 

Williams, Frank H, 

L.U. NO. 727 
HI.4LEAH, FLA. 

Borgstron, Arthur R. 



MARCH, 1973 



37 



Clarke, Dale T. 
Cunningham, Louie C. 
Grier, Edmond 
Hanger, Lloyd C, Sr. 
Kraeer, John R. 
Lensky. Raymond 
Lucier, Roger W. 
McDonald, Frank 

L.U. NO. 783 
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. 

Baumgard, August 



L.U. NO. 787 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Andreassen, Edvard 
Hansen. Die 

L.U. NO. 791 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Batt, James 
Dodson. George 
Foss, Nils 
Hansen, Gunvald 
Hetley, Gerhart 
Jacobsen, John 
Stevenson, George 
Targansky, Raphael 
Wiseman, James 



L.U. NO. 792 
ROCKFORD, ILL. 

Blomquist. Milton 
Chesky, Harlan 
Fahrig, Herman 
Genung, Leroy 
Johnson, George 
Pavlicek, Joseph 
Sarver, William 
Scott, B. G. 
Sundell. Arvid 
Wedberg, John 

L.U. NO. 937 
DUBUQUE, IOWA 

Fens. Joseph 
Kelly, Philip A. 



L.U. NO. 964 
ROCKLAND COUNTY, 

N.Y. 

Alver, Einar 
Haddeland, Albert 
Spicci, Patsy 

L.U. NO. 982 
DETROIT. MICH. 

Isaacsen, Elizabeth 
Kline, Walter 

L.U. NO. 993 
MIAMI, FLA. 

Dickhaus. R. G. 
Hammack, Marvin 
Yates, J. L. 

L.U. NO. 1055 
LINCOLN, TSEB. 

Crawford, Hugh 
Morey, DeLos 

L.U. NO. 1108 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Gorrell. Charles 
Johnson, Axel 
Martey, Sam 
Mertes, Stephen 
Tabor, Mathias 
Yankee, Rudolph 
Zaryki, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 1128 

LA GRANGE, ILL. 

Wade, Louis 



L.U. NO. 1134 
MT. KISCO, N.Y. 

Croxford, Robert 
Finch, Frederick R. 
Franzese, Luigi P. 

L.U. NO. 1138 
TOLEDO, OHIO 

Cotrufo. John 
Wetzel. James 
Wins, Thomas 



L.U. NO. 1192 
BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Former, Willis A. 
Whetstone, D. M. 

L.U. NO. 1285 
ALLENTOWN, PA. 

Schleicher, Harry J. 

L.U. NO. 1323 
MONTEREY, CALIF. 

Harbolt, A. S. 

L.U. NO. 1332 
GRAND COULEE, 
WASH. 

Bultman, Fred 
Moran, James 
Whitney, Oscar 

L.U. NO. 1367 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Thompson, Carl O. 

L.U. NO. 1394 
FT. LAUDERDALE, 
FLA. 

Pierce. Frank 

L.U. NO. 1445 
TOPEKA, KANS. 

Scrimsher, Otis E. 
Wise, George C. 

L.U. NO. 1511 
SOUTHAMPION, N.Y. 

Childs, Richard, Jr. 
Jessup. Leslie 
Stubbs, Walter 

L.U. NO. 1527 
WHEATON, ILL. 

Olson, Thomas • 
Schultz, Walter J. 

L.U. NO. 1598 
VICTORIA, B.C. 

Grundison, John W. 



L.U. NO. 1644 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Clinton. Everett 
Engen, Theodore 
Haupin, Harry 
Heyerdahl, Garfield 
Hill, Walter 
Hunter, Thomas 
Kincaid. Paul 
McFerran, Dwight 
Nelson, Clarence 
Plenty, Frank 
Tilton, Gerald 
Traeger. Anton 

L.U. NO. 1667 
BILOXI, MISS. 

Byrd, Dale T. 
Combest. Joseph A. 
Harper, Daniel D. 
Porter, G. E. 
Tootle, Clarence 

L.U. NO. 1683 

EL DORADO. ARK. 

Henderson, Ernest 

L.U. NO. 1688 
MANCHESTER, N.H. 

Hannemann, John, Jr. 

L.U. NO. 1849 
PASCO, WASH. 

Barnes, C. A. 

L.U. NO. 1884 
LUBBOCK. TEX. 

Burroughs, J. A. 

L.U. NO. 1900 
TACOMA, WASH. 

Couture. Frank 
Eckles, Robert W. 
Lang, O. N. 
Mason, Ralph 
Peck, Nelson 
Spinney, W. H. 
Sumich, John F. 
Torrey, Cleo 

L.U. NO. 1974 
ELLENSBURG, WASH. 

Christman, Gene 



L.U. NO. 2028 
GRAND FORKS, 

Newark. Joseph 



N.D. 



L.U. NO. 2144 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Godard, Harold 
Hull, Alden 
Peterson, Ingemann 

L.U. NO. 2151 
CHARLESTON, S.C. 

Andreason. Wilhara 

L.U. NO. 2236 
NEW YORK, N.Y, 

Aunio, Walter 
Axelsen, Fritz 
Bie, Chris 
Grossberg, David 
Hakkanen, Edward 
Ihrman, John 
Johnson. George 
Lewis, Lester 
Manila, Victor 
Melson. Carl 

L.U. NO. 2435 
INGLEWOOD, CALIF. 

Brantley. Isacc 
Carson, Robert L. 
Cascadden, Sidney 
Green, William S. 
Kristensen, Karl 
Matheson, Frederik 
Patillo, David 
Wick, Arvid 

L.U. NO. 2482 
MIDLAND-PENETANG, 
ONT. 

Law. John David 

L.U. NO. 2947 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Traub. Joseph 

L.U. NO. 3127 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Corrigan, Harold 



LAKELAND MEMORIAM Boycott Brings Farah $8.3 Million Loss 



John R. Kerr of Local 1991, Bedford, 
O., died Jan. 3, 1973. Burial was at 
Northfield. O. 

Richard J. Erickson of Local 87, St. 
Paul, Minn., died Jan. 16, 1973. Serv- 
ices were held at Lakeland, then his 
body was shipped to St. Paul, for burial. 

Ralph Wicklund of Local 2236, 
Bronx, N.Y.. died Jan. 19, 1973. His 
body was cremated, then buried in the 
Home Cemetery. 

Louis Sitkey of Local 1784, Chicago, 
111., died Jan. 20. 1973. Burial was in 
River Grove, 111. 

Joseph Scheff of Local 242, Chicago. 
111., died Jan. 22, 1973. Services were 
held here, then his body was shipped 
to Wilmette, 111., for burial in Ever- 
green Park, 111. 

WiUard E. Ross of Local 132, Wash- 
ington, D.C., died Jan. 25, 1973. Burial 
was in Washington, D.C. 

Carl Anderson of Local 1665, Alex- 
andria, Va.. died Jan. 27, 1973. He was 
buried in the Home Cemetery. 



The loss of $8.3 million in the past 
fiscal year, disclosed by the Farah Manu- 
facturing Co. in its annual statement, is 
concrete evidence that the international 
boycott of Farah products is having its 
effect. Clothing Workers Sec.-Treas. 
Jacob Sheinkman declared. 

Farah, many of whose workers in 
Texas and New Mexico were forced out 
on strike last spring by the company's 
illegal labor practices, has been the target 
of a national boycott sponsored by the 
AFL-CIO and an international boycott 
by the International Textile, Garment & 
Leather Workers Federation. 

The ACWA and fellow trade unionists 
have put up information picket lines at 
stores that continue to sell Farah pants. 

In its statement, which it issued as 
required by law. Farah admitted to a 
loss of S8.3 million for the fiscal year 
that ended last Oct. 31, as against a 
profit of $6 million for the preceding 
fiscal year. 

Sales for the year were SI 54.4 million 



compared to $164.6 million for the pre- 
vious year. 

For the third quarter of the year — 
the three-month period ending last July 
31 — the company reported a loss of over 
$5 million, compared with a profit of 
almost $2 million for the same period 
the year before. 

Farah also reported that its sales for 
the fourth quarter were off 9.8 percent, 
from $38.9 million to $35.1 million. 

"There is no doubt that the boycott 
is having a profound effect on the com- 
pany's sales," Sheinkman said. "It is 
unfortunate that because of its refusal to 
live up to the law of the land the Farah 
stockholders and the workers have to 
suffer." 



Always shop for the unioti label. 
It's your assurance of quality mer- 
chandise produced under fair working 
conditions. 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



Housing Statement 



Continued from page 9 

cent home for every American family" 
has been totally abandoned by Admin- 
istration fiat. This decision is not being 
made because the problems of the 
cities have been solved. It is not being 
made because the housing goals have 
been met. Housing experts, both out- 
side of and within the Administration, 
have confirmed the housing need as 
set forth in the ten-year program un- 
dertaken by Congress. Now the nation 
has been told that it is to abandon 
that program. In specific terms, only 
250,000 housing starts will involve 
subsidized housing in 1974, rather than 
the 550,000 units required if the na- 
tion is to fulfill the overall goal. The 
cutback on unsubsidized housing as a 
result of community development can- 
cellation is yet to be seen. 

Administration spokesmen now 
claim that the moratorium was im- 
posed on the housing programs be- 
cause they were not serving enough 
people. Over 2 million people in sub- 
sidized housing is a significant figure 
and now the moratorium will cut 
these programs back at a time when 
the number of households in need of 
assistance is sky-rocketing. In New 
York City, for example, it is reported 
that approximately 70 percent of all 
households cannot afl'ord unsubsidized 
housing. Yet, no alternative housing 
program is proposed by the Adminis- 
tration that could function any more 
effectively or at less cost. This abdi- 
cation of Federal responsibility for 
housing all Americans is insensitive 
and indefensible. 

The implications for non-profit 
sponsors of housing are great. By 
1970, these sponsors had produced 
over 40 percent of all subsidized units. 
The moratorium means that their role 
is largely at an end. Churches, labor 
unions, civic and minority groups have 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 




Audel, Theodore 


15 

35 


Belsaw Power Tools 


Belsaw Sharp-All 


36 


Chevrolet 


33 
31 


Chicago Technical College 


Craftsman Book Co 


16 
36 


DeSoto Tool Co 


Eliason Stair Gauge Co 


39 


Estwing Manufacturing Co 


10 


Foley Manufacturing 


29 


Fugitt Enterprises 


29 


Irwin Auger Bit Co 


39 


Locksmithing Institute 


27 


No. Amer. School of Drafting . . . 


13 


No. Amer. School of Surveying . . 


15 


Paneling Specialties Co 


35 


Skil Corporation 


11 


Stanley Works Back Cover 1 



invested large sums in projects that 
will now be cancelled. The long wait- 
ing lists of would-be tenants for these 
projects can be torn up. This result 
of the moratorium can only embitter 
those who were promised housing and 
discourage forever many of those non- 
profit sponsors who have tried to ful- 
fill those promises. Once housing is 
left almost exclusively in the control 
of the private market, housing costs 
are certain to rise. 

The full impact in terms of housing 
and jobs will be felt months from now 
when the HUD ■'pipeline" is empty and 
the existing machinery for providing sub- 
sidized housing has ground to a halt. 
The massive loss of much needed hous- 
ing will not only bring suffering and 
denial to millions of needy families but 
will have a profound "ripple out" impact 
on our economy. When the "pipeline" 
runs out, direct employment loss, exclud- 
ing those jobs that will be lost as a re- 
sult of the multiplier effect, is estimated 
at approximately a million man-years. 
But this loss of construction-related jobs 
is only the beginning. The impact of the 
moratorium on furniture producers, ap- 
pliance manufacturers, maintenance per- 
sonnel and the countless other industries 
responsible for transforming a structure 
into a home is immeasurable. While pro- 
jections further into the future are im- 
possible, the long range consequences for 
every sector of society can only be deva- 
stating. The impact on lost payrolls, lost 
purchasing power and lost tax potential 
makes the moratorium a very dubious 
economic move. 

We are aware — as is Congress — that 
the failures that have been disclosed in 
the subsidy programs result primarily 
from poor managenaent, corruption and 
dishonesty. TTiese deficiencies can be 
remedied and should certainly not be 
used as an excuse to destroy badly needed 
housing programs. Nor can this tragedy 
for millions of Americans be accepted as 
part of a grand plan to control inflation 
without a significant examination of other 
budget items and of the tax structure that 
lowers revenues by protecting the wealthy. 

The existing housing subsidy programs 
have made a significant contribution to- 
ward meeting housing goals. But the un- 
met need is still of the greatest impor- 
tance. The Administration offers no alter- 
native that could better meet this need. 
Until new and adequate programs are 
enacted, the existing programs must be 
continued. 

The AFL-CIO stands ready to work 
with the Administration in evaluating al- 
ternative approaches to the nation's hous- 
ing problems and to cooperate fully in 
the development of programs which as- 
sure that the opportunity to enjoy stand- 
ard housing is open to all families. 

We urge the Administration to rescind 
the moratorium on housing and commu- 
nity development programs immediately 
and to recommit the resources needed to 
meet the housing needs of all Americans 
as expressed in the national housing goals. 



#' 



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MARCH, 1973 



39 



IN CONCLUSION 



BRINGING THE 
YANKEE DOLLARS 

HOME 

The President Asks for Freedom to 

Deal Flexibly with World Trade, 

While Multinational Corporations 

Run Roughshod over National 

Responsibilities 



■ Now that hostilities in Southeast Asia have 
eased, the greatest threat facing the United States 
today is the possibility of an international trade 
war and the possible devaluation of the U.S. dollar 
by international monetary gamblers, who call them- 
selves international investors and bankers. 

Millions of workers across the United States, 
who depend on Yankee dollars for their livelihood, 
have let it be known through their unions that the 
situation is growing intolerable, and that something 
must be done about the U.S. trade imbalance. 
Multinational corporations — and they are big in- 
dustrial names in the U.S. economy, like GE, West- 
inghouse. Ford, etc. — are moving jobs and tech- 
nology out of the U.S. and into lesser-developed 
nations where so called "labor costs" are low, and 
where taxes on their profits are low, if not non- 
existent. And, until organized labor flashed the 
warning signals, nobody in a high and responsible 
public position seemed to be concerned. 

To date, U.S. labor has generally backed the 
Burke-Hartke Foreign Trade and Investment Bills 
now before Congress as the best answer to the 
problem. 

But this position is affected by the fact that 
counter measures now proposed might create bar- 



riers between two nations whose economies and 
whose dollars are closely tied together and fairly 
stabilized — the U.S. and Canada. 

Canadians, through the Canadian Labour Con- 
gress, have urged U.S. labor to reexamine its posi- 
tion regarding Burke-Hartke and trade barrier pro- 
posals, and U.S. labor is now mulling over this rec- 
ommendation. 

Meanwhile, President Nixon has turned his at- 
tention to the problem. Last month, he traveled 
to Florida to discuss international trade issues with 
the AFL-CIO Executive Council at its winter meet- 
ing. What he said to us, in essence, was that we 
should relax our hard line and give him the power, 
through legislation and vocal support, to deal in 
a flexible, case-by-case, way with the growing num- 
ber of import-export problems now putting Uncle 
Sam in hock around the world. 

The President must be concerned with reconver- 
sion of the U.S. economy to peacetime pursuits. 
He must realize that something must be done and 
quickly to save companies under Defense contracts 
and their employees from unemployment. Not 
only must the nation move quickly into a national 
reconversion program, but it must convert to prod- 
ucts and services which will not be undersold by 
cheap, foreign imports. 

After World War H, the U.S. converted from 
tanks and planes to washing machines and other 
consumer goods. 

The end of the Viet Nam War finds most Ameri- 
cans with substantial shares of the world's con- 
sumer goods already. 

President Nixon is asking Congress to arm him 
with the authority for negotiating more favorable 
trade terms whenever in his estimation a particular 
American industry is threatened by cheap imports. 

This is a laissez-faire approach that American 
workers will look upon with something less than 
wild enthusiasm. They have already seen this ap- 
proach used in dealing with wage and price con- 
trols. Wages have been held down, while prices and 
profits have continued to zoom upward. 

It needs to be pointed out that many American 
industries have been decimated while low-wage 
imports, over the past 10 or 12 years, have cor- 
nered more and more U.S. markets without any 
President doing much about it. 

Organized labor year after year has warned that 
disaster lurked just around the corner unless real- 
istic trade policies were instituted. But the only 
constructive thing done by any of the Presidents 
was to establish a retraining fund for employees 
who lost their jobs through escalating imports. 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



These workers were granted something like $87 
a week for the better part of a year to enable them 
(in theory at least) to retrain themselves for new 
types of work. 

The legislation did not point out how a 55- or 
60-year-old man could be retrained for a new 
career or, in fact, what kind of careers existed 
where there was a shortage of workers. 

Meanwhile, one industry after another slid down 
hill as imports hit flood tide. The protests of labor 
were voices crying in the wilderness. 

With no relief offered by the White House, until 
recent weeks, the labor movement turned its at- 
tention to the legislative approach. A number of 
national conferences were called by the AFL-CIO, 
at which the alarming developments in trade were 
not only pinpointed but documented. 

The picture that emerged from these conferences 
was truly frightening. It showed one American 
industry after another falling on difficult times be- 
cause of escalating imports from Hong Kong, 
Taiwan and Japan. 

As an outgrowth of these conferences. Senator 
Hartke and Congressman Burke introduced a bill 
which would provide protection for industries 
threatened with complete collapse because of im- 
ports. 

With support for the Burke-Hartke bill growing 
rapidly, the White House became considerably 
more concerned about the foreign trade picture, 
especially since the trade deficit last year ran into 
many billions. If the Burke-Hartke drive has ac- 
complished nothing else, thus far, it has, like Paul 
Revere's ride, alerted the country to the problem. 

Multinational corporations have a tremendous 
tax advantage in their foreign operations. As a 
result, the number of their foreign operations 
keeps growing year by year. For them, the current 
import-export situation is fine. They make a profit 
on a TV set, or a typewriter, or a printing press 
they make in a foreign factory and bring here. It 
is the American workers who are being victimized 
by the current situation. 

The labor movement has been the only segment 
of our society which is truly and permanently in- 
terested in the job situation, first and foremost. 

Ever since foreign trade became a part of Amer- 
ican economic life, imports and exports have been 
measured in dollar volume. I think the time has 
come when they should also be measured in man 
hours of work involved. 

After all, a million dollars worth of raw cotton 
exported to Japan shows up on the balance sheet 
as a million dollars worth of exports. On the other 



hand, a million dollars worth of motorcycles or 
cameras imported from Japan also show up as a 
million dollar transaction. However, the amount 
of work involved in producing a million dollars 
worth of cotton probably constitutes no more than 
four or five percent of that involved in producing 
a million dollars worth of motorcycles. 

This is not to say that exporting cotton is not 
important to the American economy. It is, and 
we need to continue exporting it as much as we 
can, but in the process we ought to have a clear 
picture of what we are trading off. 

I appreciate the President's posture in seeking 
labor's recommendations regarding the trade im- 
balance. 

But, at the same time, I urge him to pick up 
some of the "hard line" approach which labor has 
adopted. 

His experience in dealing with the North Viet- 
namese and our own 90-plus years of negotiating 
at countless bargaining tables can show the way. 

As Theodore Roosevelt once said: "Speak 
softly, and carry a big stick!" ■ 




GENERAL PRESIDENT 



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The 



APRIL 1973 




Official Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA • FOUNDED 1881 




Iffiftl 

iORMATION 





GENERAL OFFfCERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Herbert C. Skinner 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

William Konyha 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 
Charles E. Nichols 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



Secretaries, Please Note 

If your local union wishes to list de- 
ceased members in the "In Memoriam" 
page of The Carpenter, it is necessary 
that a specific request be directed to the 
editor. 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Patrick J. Campbell 

130 North Main Street 

New City, Rockland Co., New York 

10956 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

130 Mountain Avenue 
Springfield, New Jersey 07081 

Third District, Anthony Ochocki 
18400 Grand River Avenue, 
Detroit, Michigan 48223 

Fourth District, Harold E. Lewis 

2970 Peachtree Rd., N.W., Suite 300 
Atlanta, Ga. 30305 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
2800 Selkirk Drive 
Burnsville, Minn. 55378 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 
Glenbrook Center West — Suite 501 
1140 N.W. 63rd Street 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73116 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 

Room 722, Oregon Nat'l Bldg. 

610 S.W. Alder Street 

Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, M. B. Bryant 

Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 

Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 

2418 Central Avenue 

Windsor, Ontario, Canada 

Tenth District, Eldon T. Staley 
4706 W. Saanich Rd. 
RR #3, Victoria, B. C. 




William Sidell, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



In processing complaints, the only 
names which the financial secretary needs 
to send in are the names of members 
who are NOT receiving the magazine. 
In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
B member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. Members who die or are sus- 
pended are automatically dropped from 
tha mailing list of The Carpenter. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your maUing address for the magazine, which requires 
six to eight weelts. However this does not advise your own local union of 
your address change. You must notify your local union by some other 
method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME. 



Local No . 

Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS - 



City 



State or Province 



THE 



(3/A\[S[J> 





VOLUME XCIII No. 4 APRIL, 1973 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Membership Votes No on General Vote Proposition 2 

Secretary Bren nan Moves Into Duties 3 

Buffalo Area Carpenters Erect Big Bubble 4 

Coordinated Bargaining with Major Companies 6 

He Preaches on Saws, Too June Dolce 8 

DEPARTMENTS 

We Congratulate 10 

Washington Roundup 13 

Canadian Report 14 

Plane Gossip 16 

Service to the Brotherhood 17 

Local Union News 25 

Apprenticeship and Training 29 

CLIC Report ^.l..!^^ wt^. 30 

In Memoriam 38 

In Conclusion '. William Sidell 40 



POSTMASTERS, ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E., Washington, D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20« In advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

A mother and son climb for spring 
flowers in the Alpine meadows of 
Diamond Head Mountain, Garibaldi 
Provincial Park, in British Columbia. 
Behind them the peaks of mountains, 
which rise to more than 8,000 feet, 
and deep-green fir trees are reflected 
in a mountain pool. 

British Columbia is noted for its 
spectacular mountain scenery. It has 
170 individual parks in its provincial 
park system, and Garibaldi is one of 
the largest — 600,000 acres. Located 
less than 50 miles north of Vancouver, 
the province's largest city. Garibaldi 
attracts thousands of hikers, pic- 
nickers, and campers each spring and 
summer. 

The Canadian National Council for 
Walking distributes a pamphlet in 
which it suggests to Canadians and 
visitors that they "see Canada on 
foot," as our cover subjects are doing. 
The pamphlet quotes the philosopher 
Rousseau: 

"Never have I thought so much, 
existed so much, lived so much, been 
so much myself, if I may dare to say 
it, as when I went alone and afoot." 

NOTE: Readers who would like copies 
of this cover iiiimarred by a mailing label 
may obtain them by sending lOt in coin 
to cover mailing costs to the Editor, The 
CARPENTER, 101 Constitution Ave., 
NW.. Washington, D.C. 20001. 





Membership Votes NO on General 
Vote Proposition to Increase 
Per Capita Tax to Pension Fund 



■ The January, 1973, issue of 
The Carpenter reported on the fi- 
nancial condition of the Pension 
Fund. In essence, it reported that 
the Pension Fund reserve had been 
consumed and that the Pension 
Fund per capita tax would have to 
be increased, if the S30.00 per 
month level of pension benefit was 
to be continued. 

Based upon the new actuarial 
study, the General Executive Board 
and the Pension Advisor}' Commit- 
tee concluded that to endeavor to 
continue the $30.00 per month pen- 
sion benefit a Pension Fund per 
Capita tax increase of S1.25 per 
month was needed. 

Under the general vote pro\isions 
of Section 63 of the Constitution, 
a proposition was submitted to pro- 
vide for a $1.25 per month in- 



crease in the per capita tax to the 
Pension Fund. The beneficial mem- 
bership would, therefore, have to 
determine its future commitment to 
the pension program. 

The General Executive Board and 
the Pension Advisory Committee 
concluded that on such a vital issue 
every beneficial member should be 
as completely informed as possible. 
Therefore, the General Executive 
Board prepared informational ma- 
terial, giving a brief history of the 
United Brotherhood's pension pro- 
gram as well as the conclusions of 
the current actuarial study. Copies 
of this material were sent to all ben- 
eficial local unions with instructions 
to mail a copy to each beneficial 
member. 

During the month of February 



and the first two weeks of March, 
special called meetings were held in 
the various beneficial local unions 
to vote on this proposition. The re- 
sults of all of these votings were 
sent to the General Secretary. 

On March 19. 1973, a tabulating 
committee met to count the vote. 
They finished their tabulation on 
March 22. 1973, and found there 
were 62,089 votes against increasing 
the per capita tax to the Pension 
Fund by $1.25 per month and 
60,176 votes in favor of increasing 
the per capita tax to the Pension 
Fund by $1.25 per month. 

The proposition, therefore, did 
not carry and, consequendy, the 
monthly Pension benefit will be re- 
duced to be commensurate with 
Pension Fund income. ■ 




General Secretary R. E. Livinjiitoii. standing, gives final instructions to the rtterendum tubulating committee as it begins its 
work. Seated from left are: Lewis K. Pugh, Washington. D.C.. District Council, 2nd District; .Albert Potter. Calgar>', .41ta.. District 
Council, 10th District; J. F. Cross, Local 225, Atlanta, Ga.. 4th District; Eugene C. Adamson, Local 14, San Antonio, Tex., 
6th District; and Edward A. Rylands, Denver, Colo., District Council, 5th District. 



THE CARPENTER 



■ The new US Secretary of La- 
bor, Peter J. Brennan, has moved 
quickly to act upon many problems 
facing his department in 1973. 

His nomination was confirmed 
by the US Senate by an overwhelm- 
ing vote of 81 to 3 on January 31, 
and two days later he was sworn 
into office in a ceremony at the 
White House. 

He received unanimous support 
from the Senate Labor & Public 
Welfare Committee prior to full 
Senate consideration. 

Committee Chairman Harrison 
A. Williams of New Jersey, speak- 
ing on the Senate floor, said he 
thought it "appropriate, particularly 
at this time, that the person nomi- 




General President William Sidell with Secretary of Labor Peter J. Brennan 
and AFL-CIO President George Meany at a recent reception in Washington 
honoring Brennan on his appointment. The AFL-CIO President was host. 



Secretary of Labor Brennan 
Moves into Wide- Ranging Duties 



nated for this position should come 
from the ranks of organized labor, 
for the incumbent of this office is 
the only advocate in the President's 
Cabinet to represent the needs of 
the millions of working men and 
women throughout the country." 

He noted that "other groups, 
such as business and industry, have 
many spokesmen in the upper eche- 
lons of the federal government, but 
there is only one person to plead 
the workers' cause to the Executive 
Branch — the Secretary of Labor." 

Now Secretary Brennan has be- 
fore him the problems of manpower 
as they apply to the nation's recon- 
version to a peacetime economy, 
the problems of implementing the 
Occupational Safety and Health 
Act, the problems of jobs and un- 
employment, and much more. 

He has already stated his position 
on some of the issues before him. 

He has assured the national com- 
manders of the four largest veter- 
ans' organizations of the country 
of his commitment to help Vietnam 
veterans find jobs and training. 

The commanders, representing 
more than six million veterans, met 
with Secretary Brennan recently at 
the Labor Department to discuss 
veterans' jobs and manpower pro- 
grams which affect them. 

Secretary Brennan expressed par- 
ticular concern for disabled veter- 



ans. He said that disabled veterans 
are an integral part of the cost of 
war and should receive the same 
high priority that is given to defense 
commitments. 

Turning to another matter. Secre- 
tary Brennan told Congressional 
leaders that an extensive study has 
shown unemployment insurance 
coverage can be feasibly extended 
to workers on large farms. 

"The costs of providing unem- 
ployment insurance protection to 
farm workers are not prohibitive 
to farm employers or to the Unem- 
ployment Insurance (UI) systems 
as a whole," the Secretary said in a 
letter to House Speaker Carl Albert; 
Vice President Spiro T. Agnew; 
Rep. Wilbur D. Mills, chairman of 
the Committee on Ways and Means; 
and Sen. Russell B. Long, chairman 
of the Senate Finance Committee. 

The study was specifically man- 
dated by Congress in the Employ- 
ment Security Amendments of 1970 
after an Administration effort to 
bring farm workers under UI was 
defeated. 

To determine whether farm work- 
er coverage would be feasible, the 
study was undertaken by the Man- 
power Administration of the Labor 
Department in collaboration with 
agriculture research experts from 
12 land-grant universities. 

In an address to a "Jobs and the 



Environment" conference held by 
the California Labor Federation 
recently, Mr. Brennan talked about 
environmental problems. He told 
the conference: 

"Protection of the nation's econ- 
omy is just as important to the over- 
all picture as protection of its natu- 
ral resources. They go hand in 
hand." 

He said that "the price of eco- 
nomic growth need not — and will 
not — be deterioration in the quality 
of our lives and surroundings." 

"We are now buying new water 
pollution control facilities as fast as 
the construction industry can build 
them. And in the private sector, 
industrial spending for pollution 
control jumped by 50% with pos- 
sibly $5 billion to be spent during 
this year alone. That's a lot of 
money — and a lot of jobs," Secre- 
tary Brennan said. 

Mr. Brennan said some environ- 
mentalists are guilty of "extrem- 
ism." He said he and the President 
shared a "deep concern" for both 
jobs and the environment, feeling 
much remains to be done in both 
areas but that the goals are not in- 
compatible. 

Mr. Brennan indicated to the 
labor conference that he would pre- 
sent labor viewpoints on important 
issues within the Administration. ■ 



APRIL, 1973 




A 










The big ^iml bubble erected at the construction site beside the Ashland Oil refinerj. 



Bafifalo Area Carpenters 
Erect Big Bubble 



B A big vinyl bubble, nearly the 
size of a football field covers the site 
of a construction project in Tona- 
wanda, N.Y., where the Ashland Oil 
Company is building a synthetic 
natural gas plant. 

The bubble's use there marks the 
first time such a weatherproof cover 
has ever been used on a major U.S. 
construction job. 



The men who erected it were Car- 
penters — members of local unions in 
the Bufl'alo, N.Y., District Council. 
A total of 24 Carpenters was used 
during the preliminary work and the 
inflation. The day after the bubble 
was "blown up," 12 Carpenters 
completed the installation. 

There were 1 5 Laborers used dur- 
in2 the actual inflation to hold the 



leading end of the balloon down, 
while strong and gusty winds were 
blowing. 

The big bubble ofifers one answer 
to the perennial problem of sea- 
sonality in the building trades. Un- 
der such a quickly-erected vinyl roof 
cold or wet ground can be dried out, 
footings set, forms erected, and con- 
Continued on page 37 



33aii< 










\. 



jjl£. • ^ -_ 



^', 



The big bubble is unfolded on a platform above a 
mud puddle, as the erection job gets underway. 



Fans were installed at one end of the project to blow air under the 
vinyl sheet, causing it to rise and take shape along a metal track. 



THE CARPENTER 



1973 Chevrolet El Camino. 
it^ either our sportiest truck 
or our workingest car. Or both. 




The 73 El Camino. All new in the 
way it looks. All new in the way it 
behaves. The suspension is computer- 
designed and the result is the kind of 
handling and ride we think you'll wel- 
come in a sporty truck. Or a working 
car. 

Inside, there's new quiet, new ele- 
gance, new comfort. There's even a 
new bucket seat available that pivots 
90 degrees to let you sit down and 
swing in behind the wheel. 

Double walls of steel make up El 
Camino's cargo box and tailgate. Air 
booster rear shocks are standard. So 
are the front disc brakes. 

73 El Camino. Car? Truck? It's up 
^to you. 




Inside, it's luxurious. And a variety of options are available, 
like air conditioning, Comfortilt wheel, power windows. 



Chevrolet 



Buildin g a better wa y to serve the U.S.A. 




COORDINATED BARGAINING 

. . one answer to management's clout 



■ Even though they're now 
spread all over the world as so- 
called "multinational corporations," 
giant companies like General Elec- 
tric, Westinghouse, and AT&T are 
still making tremendous profits. 

General Electric, which will soon 
be discussing a new contract with 
14 unions representing 140,000 
workers, told the public press that 
its 1972 profits were at an all-time 
high, up 12% over last year. 

The net income for AT&T ex- 
ceeded $2V^ billion for the first 
time in its history. 

Corporation after corporation is 
reporting record-smashing profits, 
and their stockholders are receiving 
dividend boosts that range up to 
50%. 

This is all repeated time and 
again on North America's financial 
pages, in spite of the fact that other 
pages of today's newspapers report 
higher costs of living, higher meat 
price, more taxes, and other bitter 



^^■., 




CBC coordinators and steering conimittec members discuss 1973 plans in a confer- 
ence room in Wasiiington, D.C. 



pills which the average wage earn- 
er must swallow daily. 

It's hard to bring the giants of 
American industry to the bargaining 
table with reasonable contract offers 
— proposals for better wages and 
working conditions and a share of 
the rising profits for the thousands 
of people they employ. 

The "big boys" have clout . . . 
and it takes collective clout to deal 
with them in contract negotiations. 

It used to be — and it still is, in 



many instances — that management 
could play one union bargaining 
team against another, try to make 
a deal with one at the expense of 
the other. Contract settlements left 
hard feelings and rivalry among un- 
ions which shared equal objectives. 
It used to be, too, that the boss 
could tell his hired hand who asked 
for more money: "I can't afford it." 
The poor worker couldn't know 
whether he was telling the truth or 
not. 



THE CARPENTER 



Seven years ago a rally of trade 
unionists was held in Washington, 
D.C. They came from seven inter- 
national unions with members em- 
ployed by GE and Westinghouse — 
300 delegates from 150 local un- 
ions. They came together to achieve 
the impossible: a united, coordi- 
nated bargaining effort among un- 
ions with a generation of mutual 
hostOity behind them. 

Out of this gathering came the 
Coordinated Bargaining Committee 
of GE- Westinghouse Unions. 

Last month, in 1 5 rallies from 
coast to coast, some 2,500 delegates 
from more than 300 local unions, 
including several from the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America, gathered to 
carry forward for a third time since 
1966 a coordinated bargaining 
effort. A total of 14 international 
unions were represented. , 

The GE- Westinghouse CBC (Co- 
ordinated Bargaining Committee) is 
only one of 55 such committees 
formed in recent years to deal with 
management through the coordinat- 
ing efforts of the AFL-CIO Indus- 
trial Union Department. 

At the present time, the United 
Brotherhood is represented on 16 
of these committees. The companies 
which negotiate with these 16 com- 
mittees include: GE-Westinghouse, 
American Standard, Anaconda Wire 
and Cable Co., Armstrong Cork Co., 
Certain-Teed, Diamond Internation- 
al, Essex International, FMC Cor- 
poration-Link Belt, Globe Union, 
Hercules, Inc., Koppcrs Company, 
Inc., Rockwell International, Olin 
Corporation, Quaker Oats Compa- 
ny, Stauffer Chemical, and Whirl- 
pool. 

All of these firms employ carpen- 
ters, or millwrights, or millmen, and/ 
or allied workers in large or limited 
numbers, and the Brotherhood, 
though not organized "vertically" as 
an industrial union, in most in- 
stances, nevertheless, must protect 




Brotherhood Representative Billy Hen- 
derson, left, makes a point in prelimi- 
nary CBC discussions regarding West- 
inghouse. A Steelworkers representative 
listens. 








A telephone company representative 
shows CBC coordinators how its teletype 
network will function when negotiators 
begin comparing data and taking polls 
on management proposals. 

the interests of its members in nego- 
tiated contracts, grievances, etc. 
Hence, the Brotherhood participates 
in coordinated bargaining, indus- 
trial councils, trades councils, etc. 

When unions "coordinate" their 
bargaining, they go thoroughly into 
all aspects of a labor-management 
contract. Union representatives cov- 
er proposals for wages, hours, work- 
ing conditions, pensions, vacations, 
and scores of other categories. 
When it's time to reopen talks for 
a new contract, they are ready with 
a united front in dealing with man- 
agement. 

It has been said that coordinated 



bargaining was created as an anti- 
dote to "Boulwarism." 

In 1947 the General Electric 
Company hired a man named Lem- 
uel R. Boulware as vice president 
for employee and union relations. 
Mr. Boulware worked with a "take- 
it-or-leavc-it" formula in the tool- 
ing up period after World War II. 
GE gave unions the right to speak 
but denied them true collective bar- 
gaining . 

In place of collective bargaining, 
Boulware instituted Madison Ave- 
nue merchandising techniques to 
try to convince employees that GE 
knew best. It was like the "Ma 
Bell" attitude which once pervaded 
telephone companies. 

Division of the opposing forces 
played a big role in Boulware's 
success. Union members were di- 
vided from their leaders, and one 
union was played off against an- 
other. 

The final scene was the an- 
nouncement that the company had 
nothing more to add — take it or 
leave it — and that the company was 
prepared to take on a strike rather 
than improve its contract offer. 

The term "Boulwarism" was 
coined to designate this type of 
ersatz bargaining. 

Boulware was no longer em- 
ployed by GE when coordinated 
bargaining began in 1966, but his 
former assistants still followed his 
policies. But times have changed, 
and GE — and other firms- — now 
treat CBCs with respect. 

The 1973 talks with major com- 
panies are just getting under way. 
Before the year is over, major con- 
tracts covering more than 4.7 mil- 
lion workers will, hopefully, have 
been settled. Coordinated bargain- 
ing committees — which, incidental- 
ly, many enlightened managements 
favor — will have played a major 
role in negotiating the settlements. 



APRIL, 1973 








BY JUNE DAKE 

■ When Wallace Clark, a Bap- 
tist pastor near Fort Worth, Texas, 
starts laying out a variety of hand- 
saws, he's not getting ready to build 
something. He uses the saws and a 
violin bow to create some unusually 
beautiful music. 

My husband, Roy Dake, a mem- 
ber of Local No. 1822, Fort 
Worth, recently heard Wallace per- 
form at a men's breakfast. Roy went 
to his pickup truck and got his 
old Atkins silver steel handsaw for 
the preacher to try his bow on. 

"The range was different on my 
saw, but it sure had a lot of great 
music in it." Roy said. 

I understood what he meant. I 
heard the Rev. Clark perform be- 
fore a campfire at a youth outing 
a couple of years ago and remem- 
bered the surprising quality of music 
that came from every saw he played. 

Saw playing snagged Wallace's 

Rev. Wallace Clark with his Bible and 
saws. Note saw-shaped carrying case. 




interest when he was a boy and saw 
a redheaded man play a saw. Wal- 
lace made up his mind that, if the 
redheaded man could make music 
on a saw, he could too. 

He had a violin bow at home, 
and his mother had a saw that had 
belonged to his grandfather. Wallace 
didn't know as he kept struggling 
to learn to play the stiff old saw that 
it was one of the hardest he could 
have found to play. 

But by trial and error and sheer 
determination, the next evening he 
had mastered playing his favorite 
Sunday school song, "Jesus Loves 
Me" without a bobble. 

During his late youth, his inter- 
est fagged. When he married his 
wife, Betty, she didn't know she 
was marrying a saw player. Now. 
however, she often accompanies him 
on the piano. 

When he became a minister, he 
began playing hymns on saws and 
gradually built up a collection for 



various selections. He quickly be- 
came a novelty attraction at many 
gatherings. Recently he was inter- 
viewed and played one of his saws 
on a Television Channel 5 program 
in Fort Worth that features local 
talent. 

Wallace finds this age-old attrac- 
tion puts him on friendly terms with 
young people. He has played for 
civic groups, men's groups, women's 
groups, talent shows and school 
assembly programs. He especially 
enjoys entertaining the elderly. 

People of all ages seem to enjoy 
listening to him. It's not at all un- 
usual for him to see tears in the eyes 
of someone who has been touched 
by the beauty of a favorite hymn 
he is playing. One lady remarked 
that the saws seemed to almost sing 
the words to familiar hymns. 

How can you tell if a saw is good 
for playing? Wallace says a saw is 
good, if it is limber and if the sound 
keeps ringing when you bend it and 
thump it. The tone won't last, if the 
saw is not good. 

One of his favorites is a little saw 
he spied in the shop of a friend. He 
thumped it and declared, "Yep, this 
one will play." 

His friend replied, "You can have 
it, it sure won't cut." We tested the 
highest range on this one and found 
it reached the highest "A" note on 
the piano. 

For anyone interested in learning 
to play Wallace recommends "Keep 
on trying. It's a lot of fun." ■ 



Children are enraptured by the tunes which come from the 
musical saw, handled deftly by the Fort Worth minister. 







,;• f 



Liimbec Metal. Concrete. 
Worm-drive Skilsavrcuts 
tlirougli almost 



anything. 




Powerful 13 amp 
motor delivers power 
for most demanding cut- 
ting jobs. High-torque, worm- 
drive gears mean fast cutting of lumber, metal, 
stone, tough compositions. % Total ball bear- 
ing construction for long, trouble free life. 
Air flow hood directs cool air over gear case 
and cleans line of cut. % Extra strong foot of 
heavy gauge ribbed steel steadies saw for ac- 
curate cutting. 



Be sure you're getting high quality alloy 
or carbon steel. Insist on genuine Ski! 
saw blades. 

Substitool keeps you on the job if 
we keep your saw in our shop for repair. 
Register with Skil as a professional tradesman 
when you purchase a Skilsaw worm-drive saw 
or other Skil tool covered by the Skil Substitool 
program. 

And if we ever have to keep it in our shop for 
service we'll lend you a Substitool free. 

Nobody was ever sorry he bought the best there is. 




[^©fflfflD^aflOOfeff 



1000 



. . . those members of our Brotherhood who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to pubHc offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "stood 
out from the crowd."' This month, our editorial hat is oflf to the following: 




Mijinesota citizens line up for $1 Horth of banana split at "the world's longest 
banana split," erected by Local 1644 members. Read the full story below. (Photo 
from UPI) 



LONGEST BANANA SPIIT-What is known 
to be the longest banana split ever built 
— one mile in length — was produced 
recently for the North Star, Minn., Chap- 
ter of Multiple Sclerosis as a fund- 
raising project, in conjunction with the 
St. Paul Winter Carnival. 

This "banana split" was a continuous 
rain gutter furnished by the local Sears 
and Roebuck store, which was held 36 
inches off the ground by wooden stand- 



ards every 10 feet. The big split was 
erected on McKnight Road, east of St. 
Paul. Minn., by Carpenters early Sunday 
morning, January 28, 1973, all of whom 
were members of Local 1644. Minne- 
apolis. They included: Donald Classen, 
Reginald Cobb. Donald Jackman. James 
Kline. Wally Knops. Pat McMillan. 
Robert Olsen. Harold Pearson, Darrell 
Ray. Ed Svoboda, Roger Kortz and 
JJerbert Kortz. 



The members donated their time for 
a worthwhile cause and were able to 
help raise more than $10,000 from the 
7,040 individual banana splits that were 
sold in two hours. The ice cream, top- 
ping, bananas, whip cream and nuts 
were all donated by local businessmen. 
The temperature that day was 5° above 
so the ice cream did not melt. It was a 
tremendous fund raiser, with more than 
20.000 turned away. 

STATE SENATOR'S PLAUDITS— In a recent 
letter to the General President, Ken- 
tucky State Senator Tom Garrett of 
Paducah commended W. D. Sanders, 
business agent of Local 559, Paducah, 
for his "outstanding contributions to the 
community." 

Senator Garrett described how San- 
ders had provided the leadership to 
renovate an old home called Renaissance 
House, turning it into a home for de- 
pendent juveniles and, thus, saving the 
juveniles from "incarceration in our anti- 
quated jail." 

Sanders was also instrumental in the 
construction of a senior citizens' home 
in Paducah. which will ultimately cost in 
excess of $4 million and will consist of 
237 units on 19 floors. 

"There has hardly been any public 
project involving labor organization of 
this community in which Mr. Sanders 
has not been the first to offer the assist- 
ance of himself and of his organization 
to promote the commonweal of this 
community," the state legislator com- 
mented. 

UNIVERSITY CHANCELLOR-A Carpenter 
was recently installed as chancellor of 
the University of Wisconsin-Stout of 
Menomonie, Wis. 

He is Robert mt^^f -^rasmj. 
Swanson. a 47- Wm ^^^K 

year-old PhD and 
a member of Local 
1074. Eau Claire. 
Wis. Swanson is 
the son of the late 
Hugo Swanson, 
longtime member 
and leader of Lo- 
cal 755, Superior, 
Wis Swansou 

The younger Swanson's work in car- 
pentry began in Superior at age 16 when 
he obtained a work permit through Local 
755 there. He worked during summers 
in high school with his father. After 
military service in World War II. Dr. 
Swanson joined Local 68 in Menomonie, 
paying his way through college with car- 
pentry jobs. 

When the Menomonie Local ceased, 
he transferred his membership to Eau 
Claire. Most of his work was in home 
construction. He has done much cabinet 
work. also. He is extremely proud of 
his long association with the trade. 

The Wisconsin State Council of Car- 
penters, incidentally, has awarded an 
annual scholarship to students who at- 
tend Stout. To this date. 26 students 
have been aided by this program. The 
award is now $1,500. 




10 



THE CARPENTER 




Valerie Sawyer (second from left) as she 
received the California Ladies Auxiliary 
State Council Scholarship Award pre- 
sented by (from left) Pearl Staley. presi- 
dent of District 412; Hope Cain, state 
council president; and Nina Emniert, 
District 1 board member. 

CALIFORNIA SCHOLAR 

Valerie Sawyer, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles Sawyer of Vista, Calif., 
was guest of honor at a recent luncheon 
of Vista Carpenters Ladies Auxiliary No. 
12 at Brackens World. 

Valerie was honored as 1972 recipient 
of the Carpenters Ladies Auxiliary State 
Council Scholarship Award, which is co- 
sponsored by the California State Federa- 
tion of Labor, AFL-CIO. 

Thirty-five auxiliary members attended, 
including those from Auxiliaries No. 170 
and No. 506, San Diego, the State Coun- 
cil president and the district board 
member. 

While attending Vista High School 
Valerie received a life membership in 
California Scholarship Federation, was 
production manager for "Las Obras," the 
school's literary anthology, and served 
as student representative to the Vista 
Beautiful Committee. 

FRONT-PAGE NOTICE— A tribute to a 50- 
year member of Local 334, Saginaw, 
Mich., was recently spread across the 
entire six columns of The Saginaw News 
front page. 

The feature article paid tribute to the 
long and devoted service of Jacob Mi- 
chel with the local union and the recog- 
nition of him as "local labor organiza- 
tion historian." Currently serving his 
local union as financial secretary, Michel 
has also served in the past as recording 
secretary and trustee. 

Michel described for a Saginaw News 
writer the early days of Local 334. It 
was granted a charter in 1887, with 25 
charter members, an initiation fee of 
25 cents and monthly dues of 35 cents. 

"In 1903," Michel related, "William 
L. Hutcheson (later to become general 
president of the Brotherhood) became 
business agent for both Local 334 and 
(what was then) Local 59, which served 
Carpenters on the east side of the Sagi- 
naw River." 

According to Michel, the late General 
President Hutcheson first covered his 
"territory" on a bicycle and later 
switched to a horse and buggy. 




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APRIL, 1973 



11 



SERVING THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY'S NEED FOR INFORMATION SINCE 1950 



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12 



THE CARPENTER 




ON 




({ )) l\M 

ROUNDUP 



NLRB UNFAIR— The National Labor Relations Board, which has the job of policing un- 
fair labor practices, has been found guilty of such a practice itself. Former 
Assistant Secretary of Labor W. J. Usery ruled that Board Chairman Edward B. 
Miller was unfair when he instituted new procedures without consulting the WLRB 
Professional Association. Miller must post notices that he won't do it again. 

LOW ON CAPITAL-If you can't raise $50 to file for bankruptcy, you're too poor to 
be bankrupt. That's the conclusion of the U.S. Supreme Court in a recent deci- 
sion. 

WHITE HOUSE COMMUTING— If you wonder what you, as a taxpayer, are paying for 
President Nixon's frequent flights to his California and Florida substitute White 
Houses, here's the answer: It's $1,180 per flying hour. No one has been able to 
estimate the cost of the standby time. 

NO-FAULT FOR ELDERLY — Senator Adlai E. Stevenson III (D-Ill.) told the National 
Council of Senior Citizens that the elderly would benefit more than any other 
group from enactment of no-fault automobile insurance legislation. 

In an address to the NCSC's executive board, Stevenson said "no-fault" would 
result in premium cuts for the elderly covered by Medicare and end arbitrary can- 
cellations and refusals to insure based on age. 

UNFAIR COMPLAINTS UP — Fiscal Year 1972 which ended last June 30 was far from a 
period of labor-management harmony. 

Complaints against employers hit the 17,736 mark for an increase of 15 per- 
cent; charges against unions totaled 9,03 for a rise of about nine percent. 

The record against employers in the number of official complaints made by the 
NLRB which found merit in the original charges was even worse — 76.1 percent 
against employers; 20.6 percent against unions and 3.3 percent against both 
employers and unions. 

SEGREGATED SMOKERS — The AFL-CIO Union Label and Service Trades Department, acting 
on a request from the Tobacco Workers, has expressed opposition to a proposal by 
the Civil Aeronautics Board making it mandatory for smokers and non-smokers to be 
segregated on aircraft. 

In a letter to Harry J. Zink, Secretary of the Board, Murphy said that such 
action would establish a precedent for segregating passengers for a wide variety 
of reasons. 

Murphy called attention to a study by the Department of Health, Education, 
and Welfare and the Federal Aviation Administration released in December of 1970 
which concluded that airline passengers were not subject to any health hazard as a 
result of smoking in the aircraft. 

NEED FOR JOB SAFETY— During the 19 months of its existence, the Occupational Safety 
and Health Administration has made 52,034 inspections resulting in 34,355 cita- 
tions alleging 167,352 violations with proposed penalties totaling $3,966,435. In 
that same period, 6,141 complaints were investigated. 

During January of this year, the Administration conducted 2,577 inspections, 
resulting in 1,249 citations alleging 6,964 violations with proposed penalties of 
$196,242. 

PROBLEMS RECYCLED— American housewives were urged by Rep. William Cotter (D-Conn.) 
to send President Nixon their grocery receipts as a massive protest against soar- 
ing food prices. A White House aide was asked what would happen if the IWiite 
House was inundated by grocery receipts. "Why, we'd recycle the paper," he said. 

APRIL, 1973 13 



^VBH%ANADIAN 
' n^ REPORT 

NEW FEDERAL BUDGET SHOWS 
TAX RELIEF AND PENSION GAINS 



The federal budget was anticipated 
with more than usual interest this 
year. One reason was that last year's 
budget was considered a near-disaster. 
and the public's dissatisfaction with 
this and other policies was made evi- 
dent at the polls. 

Now a new and much-chaslened 
Liberal government has introduced its 
first budget as a minority government 
and showed that it has learned a few 
lessons in the last year or so. 

The question is: has it learned 
enough? But there are, without doubt 
some positive measures included. 

First, the income tax changes are 
geared to help the lower income peo- 
ple more than the higher incomes, so 
that no taxpayer will save on taxes 
less than Si 00 or more than S500. 
The tax exemption base is increased, 
and about 750,000 taxpayers won't 
have to pay taxes under the new rates, 
in addition to those already tax ex- 
empt through deficiency of income. 

The next positive item is that the 
basic old age security pension payable 
to all is increased from S82.88 to 
$100 a month at age 65. Senior citi- 
zens with minimum incomes will still 
get the guaranteed income supplement 
bringing their combined pension pay- 
ments up to $170 a month for a single 
person and $325 for a couple. 

Federal sales tax and tariff's are 
being reduced on some essentials like 
children's clothing and imported 
foods. 

The government claims — hopes 
would be a better word — that the 
budget should help reduce unemploy- 
ment to about 5,2% this year (it was 
6.2 % on average last year — much 
higher in some regions) and also help 
to restrain price increases. 

It is on these two points that critics 
raise doubts. On unemployment, most 
think that we'll be lucky if unemploy- 



ment comes down half a point, and 
the way things are going now. more 
price increases are in the offing. 

The Canadian Labor Congress 
thinks the tax cuts should have been 
much more extensive, for example, 
giving everyone earning under SIO.- 
000 a year, a two-month tax holiday; 
and giving old age pensioners triple 
the increase they are going to get. 

In other words the budget is not 
expansionary enough to make a real 
dent in unemployment. 

But the New Democratic Party is 
supporting the government, even 
though it has reservations about its 
efl'cct on unemployment. It is a better 
document than the one last year and 
deserves a try. 

Building Trades 
Push Wage Guarantee 

The building trades unions affiliated 
with the Quebec Federation of Labor 
are after a guaranteed annual wage 
in their current negotiations with the 
construction industry. 

In Quebec province, negotiations 
take place on a provincewide basis. 

One of the big building trades un- 
ions would have preferred to go after 
a shorter work week at no loss in 
takehome pay. But the decision to 
key in the guaranteed wage may have 
been made on the basis of the fact 
that the longshoremen's union has 
already won it. 

Pensions are also an issue and likely 
to be a contentious one. The unions 
fear some problems in the existing 
pension funds and are in process of 
investigating. 

One of the beefs against the budget 
voiced by the construction industry is 
the government's failure to remove 



the 1 1 per cent tax on building mate- 
rials. 

This has been a long-standing com- 
plaint but with construction being one 
important key to economic stimula- 
tion, it was thought that this was the 
year that the sales tax would be at 
least reduced, if not removed. 

73 Construction 
Should Maintain Level 

It is possible that the federal finance 
authorities didn't think that construc- 
tion needed a stimulus this year. Last 
year residential construction reached 
an alltime high, and this year might 
be as good. 

But this year may also see an im- 
provement in commercial construc- 
tion. 

Certainly the Metro Toronto area 
vv'hich has highest growth rate for 
construction per capita of any urban 
area on the continent should main- 
tain its record. 

Personal Income 
Brings Tax Revenue 

One continuing trend in Canada's 
taxation system is that more and more 
of total tax receipts are coming out 
of personal taxation, less and less out 
of corporations. 

The estimate for 1973-4 is that 
personal income taxpayers will be 




As the chart above indicates, the aver- 
age Canadian today is paying less per- 
sonal income taxes. But corporations are 
doing better. (See story above.) 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



paying 44% of the total tax bill, cor- 
porations 14%. 

Just five years ago personal income 
taxes provided 37% of budgetary rev- 
enue, corporation taxes 21%. 

Crime Prevention 
Via Urban Design 

Architects are worried that they 
are losing business to big developers 
who bypass them and let their engi- 
neering teams do the whole job. They 
are also concerned that they are not 
keeping up with the times. 

The Ontario Association of Archi- 
tects invited a Canadian-born profes- 
sor of architecture now teaching at 
Columbia and New York Universities 
to give them his views about current 
problems. 

He gave them an earful. As author 
of a new book and bestseller called De- 
fensible Space: Crime Prevention 
through Urban Design. Professor 
Oscar Newman warned Canadian 
architects that this country is not 
immune from the urban problems 
besetting the United States. 

Among other things, he said crime 
rates in a typical highrise public hous- 
ing project are 3.5 to 7 times as high 
as those in adjacent lowrise projects, 
that crime rates increase with the 
height of project buildings, the bigger 
the building, the higher the crime 
rate, and that most of the crimes are 
committed by children 9 to 15 years 
old. And that's not all. 

On the other hand, he discovered 
that projects in a number of cities 
which were neat, clean and safe were 
designed as lowrise clusters or mixed 
groups of lowrise and highrise build- 
ings which provided the tenants with 
some important amenities. 

These amenities included many 
more entrances instead of just two 
doors, one front, one back; dispersed 
play areas visble to parents and 
with quick and easy access; public 
walkways designed to pass front 
doors. 

These suggestions and others are 
meant to permit for a natural com- 
munity surveillance system, for resi- 
dents to develop a sense of personal 
and joint responsibility for what goes 
on and to become more familiar with 
their neighbours. 

Professor Newman'.s studies were 
financed by the U.S. Department of 
Justice. His findings and views are a 
good lesson not only for architects 
but for everyone concerned with the 
wholesome growth of our urban areas. 



Toronto Real Estate 
Highest in Canada 

A real estate survey has shown that, 
last year, housing in Toronto sold at 
an average price of $33,600, highest 
in Canada, with Vancouver next at 
$30,600. 

Families having to move from else- 
where in Canada to either of these 
cities will find that the home they sold 
won"t buy a new home of equal qual- 
ity. 

The average home in Ontario sold 
for over $28,000, in British Columbia 
and Quebec for over $25,000. 

The lowest average cost was in Sas- 
katchewan at $16,400. Even the low- 
income Maritime provinces had an 
average home cost of over $22,000. 

Big Business Not 
So Charitable 

Big business are not the big givers 
they are sometimes thought to be. 

Research by a private group using 
federal funds has turned up some 
interesting facts about corporate giv- 
ing. 

The first is that Canada's top cor- 
porations donate less than 1% of 
their pretax profits to charity. 

Most large corporations regard phi- 
lanthropy as a burden rather than as 
a useful social tool. 

The study was critical of federal 
legislation which allows foundations 
to maintain almost complete secrecy 
about their activities. 

Co-op Housing 
Gets Federal Aid 

The Federal housing agency is giv- 
ing a more important role to coopera- 
tive housing than it has before. 

New amendments to the National 
Housing Act will make cooperatives 
eligible for loans to purchase existing 
housing and to improve housing in 
need of repair. 

Co-op housing planned for the in- 
come group between $5,000 and $11,- 
000 a year will be eligible for 100% 
loans and for starter funds, plus assist- 
ance to the lower income families. 

Co-op housing groups have had a 
hard time getting recognition in this 
country. Maybe they have it now, 
thanks to Dr. A. F. Laidlaw, senior 
advisor on housing co-ops to Central 
Mortgage and Housing Corporation, 
the federal agency. 



The Carpenters 

FIRST CHOICE 

in heavy duty 
Ripping '^ 
Hammers 




999 



Power packed head design 
with sturdy rip claws 
Your choice of hickory, 
fiberglass, tubular or all 
steel handles 

Variety of sizes and weights 
Sure lock® head-to-handle 
tightness 

Ask your tool supplier 

VAUGHAN & BUSHNELL MFG. CO 



l]414 MAPLE AVt ..HfBRON, IlL 60034 



APRIL, 1973 



15 




GOSSIP 



SEND YOUR FAVORITES TO: 

PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONSTITUTION 

AVE. NW, WASH., D.C. 20001. 

SORRY, BUT NO PAYMENT MADE 

AND POETRY NOT ACCEPTED. 



Marriage Problem 

A marriage counseller, questioning 
a wife, asked, "Did you wake up 



grumpy this morning 



7" 



"N 

sleep! 



she replied, "I let h 



im 



MAKE YOUR SSS CLICK— GIVE TO CLIC 

Short Order 

Wife: Darling, I'm afraid dinner 
will be a little burned tonight. 

Husband: hlow come? Did they 
have a fire at the delicatessen? 

STRIKE A LICK— GIVE TO CLIC 

Short and Sweet 

Toastmaster: Because it is getting 
late, I have asked the doctor to make 
his talk on sex as short as possible. 

Doctor: Gentlemen, it gives me 
great pleasure. 

R U REGISTERED 2 VOTE? 

Who's More Stupid? 

Said the V.I. P. to his assistant, "I'm 
telling you 1 went away to school, 
stupid!" 

And the assistant replied. "You 
came back stupid, too, sir." 



Another Tiny Truth 

"When I see the mountains and 
rivers from an airplane," he stated, 
"I realize how Insignificant a thing 
is man." 

"That's hardly news," observed an 
attentive Ms. "I could have told you 
that without going up In an airplane." 

U R THE ■ U" IN UNIONISM 

On The Block 

Boss: This is the end. You're fired. 
Worker: Fired? I thought slaves 
v/ere sold. 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 

Hare and There 

Concluding paragraph of a news 
story in a midwestern country paper 
telling about a man who was killed as 
he climbed through a fence with a 
loaded gun: "The deceased is sur- 
vived by his widow, three children 
and one rabbit." 

BUY ONLY UNION-MADE TOOLS 

How's That Again 

Airman to officer: Our antl-antl- 
mlssile missile just shot Itself down, sir. 




From the Mouths of Babes 

The teacher of the first-year Sun- 
day School class wasn't getting much 
response from her pupils. 

"Doesn't anyone know who Peter 
was?" she asked. 

A small voice from the rear piped 
up: "Wasn't he a wabbit?" 



This Month's Limerick 

There was a young lady named Alice 
Who used a dynamite stick in her 
palace 

They found her wand 
Back of the beyond 
And the rest of sweet Alice In Dallas 



Mr. Pert Sez: 

Legally, the husband is the head 
of his household and, legally, the 
pedestrian has the right-of-way. Both 
are completely safe so long as nei- 
ther seeks to exercise their rights. 




Furniture Repairs 

The guest watched with amazement 
the small boy amuse himself by driv- 
ing nails into the furniture. Recover- 
ing himself a bit, he said to his host: 
Joe, Isn't that an expensive pastime 
your son has? hlow can you afford It? 

"Oh, It's not bad," answered the 
father. "We get the nails wholesale." 

UNIONISM STARTS WITH "U" 

Little on The Sides 

Teenage boy: Are you the barber 
who cut my hair last time? 

Barber: It wouldn't have been me. 
I've only been here two months. 

BE UNION— BUY LABEL 

Take A Memo 

Stenog: How come you switched 
back from midls to minis? 

Secretary: Because I've been in 
too much hot water since the boss 
started watching my work Instead of 
my legs. 

UNION DUES— TOMORROWS SECURITY 

Spunk, Spank, Squawk 

"Teach said I need more spunk," 
grunted the tough little kid to his 
pal. 

"What's spunk?" 

"I think It's the past tense of 
spank," answered the tough one. 

UNION MEN WORK SAFELY 

Daffynition 

Hypotenuse — The upstairs bath- 
room Is In use. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 




::z:'m 




A gallery of pictures showing some of the senior members of the 
Brotherhood who recently received 25-year or 50-year service pins. 







BELLAIRE, OHIO 

Carpenters Local 17 recently held an 
awards banquet at the Holiday Inn in 
St. Clairsville, Ohio, for 25- and 50- 
year members. 

Members unable to attend to receive 
their 25-year pins were as follows: 
George Ctine, Oakley Miller, Arthur 
Morrison, Nathan Freeman, Wm. H. 
Gardner, Ernest Graham, Sr., Lowell 
Hickman, and Don Sommer. 

In the picture at left, above, seated, 
left to right: Ed Scales, Delbert 
Robbins, Herman Brown, Ray 
Feaster, and Pearly Thomas. 

Standing: left to right: Richard Rist, 



Harold Roby, Andy Zonkoski, Paid 
Morrison, John Thompson, Joe Lyie, 
Ralph Reed, and Heniy Ebbert. 

In the picture at right, above, 
seated, left to right: Ted Junkins, 
Edward Eikleherry, Maynard Butler, 
Kenneth Buskirk, Charles Berry, and 
Charles Beatty. 

Standing: Ray Mellot, Warren 
Carpenter, John Kocara, Leo Homer, 
Frank Cochran, John Krajnyak, 
Albert Lude, Myles Mcintosh, and 
Linsz McLaughlin. 

In the small picture. International 
Representative Bob Sauer presented a 
50-year pin to Zeil Hart. 




.¥:?fS2^1.ISX^ 





f^jjjg^' 




NORTH TONAWANDA, N.Y. 

A pin presentation ceremony M'as 
held recently by Local 369, 
N. Tonawanda. Buddy Bodewes, 
president of Buffalo District Council, 
made ihe presentations, paying special 
tribute to members receiving 50-year 
pins. 

The 25-year members honored are 
shown in the large photograph. Seated 



from left to right are: Samuel 
Schebell, Chester Peters. John 
Miskow, John Wolanyk, Frank 
Plewack. James Helm, Edgar 
Westlake. Standing, middle row left 
to right: William Ricketts, Allen 
Kaiser, Jack Borning, James Tompson, 
Robert Steigerwald, Robert Scranton, 
Horace McCarthy, Norman Baiunan, 
and Llovd Welch. 



Standing: John Caldwell, Lawrence 
Swayze, Franklin Hodgson, Clair 
Nichols, Alvin Hartman, Earl 
Hue kens, and Rodney Albon. 

The 50-year members honored are 
shown in the small photograph. 
Standing left to right: President Buddy 
Bodewes presenting Roy Carroll and 
Martin Freebiirg with their 50-year 
pins. 



APRIL, 1973 



17 



PORTSMOUTH, O. 




Heiihcll Giillett, president of 
Local 437 , presents a service pin to 
Albert Grashell, who holds a 
life membership in the union. 




In the picture iih<n i . a :ii-year pin 
was awarded to Otis Newman by 
President Hershell Gullett and 
another 50-year pin went to 
William Leesburg from James 
Cooper, financial secretary and 
business representative. 




Receiving 35-year pins were: left 
to right. W. C. Woodriim, Ben 
Samuel, and Luther Cannaday. 



Members receiving 30-year pins are 
shown at right: 

First row, left to right: Oscar 
Hunt, Frank Jones, David Cobler, 
Clayton Bays, Roily Patterson, and 
Ernie Pertuset. 

Second row: William Tipton, 
H. C. Jones, Fred Multer, Luther 
Shumate, Henry Tienian, and 
Edward Strickland. 









!;JjJ:': 









M 



m 
P 
m 







MAYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 

Membership pins for 25 years of service were awarded 
in Local 3161, recently. In the front row: left to right, 
Sabino Estrada. Albert Garcia, Ray Tafoya. Middle row: 
James Wall, Albon Smith, George Acosta, Carlos Murillo. 
Top row: John Rodriguez. Anna Reynolds, Frank Krause. 
Others who received pins but were unable to attend the 
ceremonies and buffet put on by the local union in November 
are as follows: 

Bernie Barron, John Buell, C. P. Granado, Ada Bell, 
Joe M. Salazar, Paul Sanchez, John A. Stevens. 
Alex Tolmachoff, Frank Beer, James Gerard. Pedro Loera, 
Jose Rivera, Faustina Salinas, Ernest Schindewolf, 
Will Thomas, and Alvino Vasquez. 






f. 




I ^ 



Twenty-five year pins, first row, 
left to right: James A. Cooper, 
Lloyd Fields, Ernie Chamherlin, 
Archie Hall. Clarence Hornikel, 
Paul Howell, Harold Ruark, aiul 
Richard Berry. 

Second row: Kyle Newhart. 
Jerry O'Neal, Charles E. Vandcrpool, 
Orville Shaw, Harry James. Robert 
McMurty, Fred Grooms, Ray Davis, 
Cecil Campbell, and James Orsban. 





IS 



THE CARPENTER 



NEWBURGH, N.Y. 

Local 301, recently celebrated 
its 85tli anniversary with a gala 
dinner dance at Villa Neiiva in 
Plattekill. N.Y. Approximately 400 
members, wives and guests 
attended. 

Highlight of the evening was the 
presentation of service pins to 
members with 25 to 60 years of 
good standing membership. 

Shown in the picture, left to right, 
are: front row, on floor: Joseph F. 
Olympia. Dominic!; Saffiotti, 
Peter Egizjano, Fred Prange, Jr., 
Bernard Murray, George Crawford. 
Middle row, sitting: Nicholas 
Randazzo, Vincent Allen, Wilson 
Connors, J. F. Brundage, Carl 
Miller, John Nolan, Kenneth 
Vernooy. Back row, standing: 
Adolpli Pictschman, Nelson Beck, 
Myron VanDerMark, James 
Greenwood, George Smith, John 
Werner, Sr. 

The full list of recipients of 
service pins in Local 301. 

60-YEAR PIN— William Watt. 

55-YEAR PIN— John Barr, 
Joseph A. Evans, Jr., John G. 
Lindstrom. 

50-YEAR PIN~Ernest H. Thorn, 
Peter Carlson, Fred Olson, 
Kenneth R. Mai Her. 

45-YEAR PIN— Michael Ewanich, 
Bernard H. Murray, John Obcrmeier. 

40-YEAR PIN— Walter Labrenz. 

35-YEAR PIN—Mathew 
Giistafson, Joseph Olympia. Alex 
Rigatti, Innis Williams. Julius 
Adorjan, Peter Diida, Peter 
Egiziano, John J. Jockers, Edward 
E. Labrenz, C. J. Langeland, 
Walter O'Dell Harry Peterson. 
Myron VaiiDemark, Sr., Lester P. 
Weber, John B. Bertero, Menzo 
Gorton, William F. Spooner. 

30-YEAR PIN— Howard W. 
Anstey. Amadeo F. Faella. Myron 
T. VanDemark. Jr., Clifton Beck, 
Sr., Nelson Beck, Jr., Robert J. 
Lind, Howard Nott, Sr., Thomas 
A. Gill. Sr. 

Fred Prange, Jr., Attilio Rigatti, 
Frank Giambrone, Leonard Gorton, 
Daniel Goulet, Edwin L. Moore, 
Nicholas Randazzo, John Werner, 
Sr., Chester Yeaple, Arthur Aagenas, 
Vincent J. Allen, Albert Barr, 
Joseph Biasini. J. S. Brundage, 
George W. Diegel, Joseph Fazio, 
Vito Gironda, Jr.. Frank J. 
Heniniig, Edward J. Lockwood. 
Angelo Mascioli, James Mosher. Jr., 
Floyd S. Oakley, Walter H. Sarvis. 
Edward T. Smith, Albert Zagorski. 

25-YEAR PIN—W. George 
Burger, John P. Eignor, Pitt 
Anderson, Fred Decker, Amos J. 
Deyo, Frederick H. Fischer, 




Morrison L. Middleton, Frank J. 
Smith, George L. Bowen, Robert W. 
Burgeson, Harry O. Carlsen, 
Stephen Chojnacki, George Coe, 
Wilson Conner, George B. 
Crawford, Martfelu Delarose, 
Joseph E. Earl, Sr., Frederick Gida, 
Ralph Green, James E. Greenwood, 
Clarence Hall, Jr., Reinhard 
Hall, Jr., Bjarne Hoffmoen, Eric A. 



Johnson, George Langlitz, Carl 
A. Miller, John F. Nolan, Erick A. 
Olsen, Patrick Pacenza, Adolph L. 
Pietschman, John J. Schmidt, 
Edwin A. Schrader, Hudson W. 
Sillings, George R. Smith, Carl E. 
Westergren, Jolm J. Yack, Sr., 
Stanley C. Davie, Harry Groves, 
Hugh McCullom, Dominick Saffioti, 
Kennetli H. Vernooy. 




DENVER. COLO. 

Members of Local 55 recently 
received 25- and 50-year pins at the 
local's annual banquet dinner. 
Tliey are identified as follows: Front 
Row: Ray Olson, financial secretary; 
Frank Miclialowski and Victor 
Wo.xberg, 50-year members; James 
McFarland, president; Henning 
Johnson and Noble Butt, 50-year 
members. Middle Row: 25-year pins, 
left to right: George Adams, Carl 
Leib. Leroy Lingle, John Garcia, 
Lylc S. Gibson, Pierre L. Ehrlich, 
Lawrence Scherbarth, Edward 
Johnson & Elmer Oftedahl. Top 
Row: 25-year pins, left to right; 
Howard Hruby, Leslie M. Prickett. 
S. Glen Provorse, Dennis Robinson, 
L. H. Urbach, James Kelley, A. H. 
Halt, Norman S. Dow, Alvin Dreiling 
and Robert Arnold. 



The small picture is of Oscar 
Ekblad and Ids wife of 60 years, 
who was presented his 65-year pin 
at their aiuuversary reception by 
Labon Ryan, an officer of Local 55 
and Mrs. Ray Olson, president of 
the Colorado State Auxiliary. 




APRIL, 1973 



19 



J 









pfm^-'-i 



WICHITA FALLS, TEX. 

Receiving 25-year pins at a meeting of Carpenters 
Local 977 in tlie Lalyor Temple, last year, were: front rotv, 
left to right, J. W. Jackson, business representative of 
Local 977 and president of the Texas State Council of 
Carpenters: Norman A. Smith: Claude C. Ritchie, former 
business representative of Local 977 and past president of the 
State Council of Carpenters, and a 50-ycar member, 
who presented the pins: J. P. Hall: J. E. Whitcaker: and 
Wayne E. Phillips, president of Local 977. 

Back row, left to right, Mabry P. Erwin: Clint E. Shellon: 
Bill Mutton; David Hodges: and Wm. C. (Bill) Brenner. 

Members who received pins but who are not shown in the 
picture are: W. L. Duncan. Marvin O. Fox, Emmett F. Irliy, 
Harold J. McBryde, Charlie L. Moore, Floyd Phillips, 
Nathan C, Phillips. Clarence R. Priest, Robert L. Priest, Odell 
Rector. O. J. Rickman, S. M. Walker, and Walter B. West. 





STEVENS POINT, WIS. 

During its Christinas Party last December. Local 1919 
presented service pins to members. 

The names of the men in the front row are: Michael 
Kozak, Paid Kitowski, Jonas Engelhretson and Edward 
Thurn. 

Back row: Ben Jablouski, William Zoroinski, Dominic 
Stroik, Ernest Stroik and Gilbert Rekowski. 




ST. ALBANS, W. VA. 

Among those presented 25-year pins by Local 12S were 
the following: First row, from left. Jay Conklin, Jack 
Cavender, James Hayes, John Doss, James Whitlock, and 
Business Agent Johnny Harris. Second row, Jules 
Biron, James Gro.scup, Harold Poff. and Paul Wilson. 



CHICAGO, ILL. 

Local 434 recently honored one of its members who 
reached the 50-year mark in service to the Brotherhood. 
Those in the picture, from left to right, are: Dale Garner, 
financial secretary: Charles Sprietsma, recording secretary; 
William Beemster Boer, president: David Kuiken, 50-year 
member; Ed. L. Nelson, business representative; 
Geo. Benseina, trustee. 

Standing, Richard Survey, trustee; Patrick Moran, 
warden: Thomas Cure, treasurer; Stephen Petzer, coiuluctor. 

Brother Kia'ken was presented with a gold 50-year pin (Uid 
a small gift. 





HAMILTON, O. 

Local 1 787 held its first awards presentations last year. 

The awards were for 25 years or more of service. The 
members each received a gold Brotherhood ring, and the 
women each received a birthstone ring. 

In the picture, left to right, starting at the bottom row, 
ihey are as follows: Emanuel Sweeney, Ida Nash, Hannah 
Hale, Clara Owens, John Mitchell. Middle row: Oscar Jones, 
Raymond Rimer, Emerson Miller. George Massey, 
Robert Kirby. 

Top row: William Swink, financial secretary: Jackie 
Vaughn, vice-president: L. Monty Erb, btisiiwss agent; Jesse 
McVey, president: William A slier, recording secretary: 
Sherman Swihart, treasurer. 

Those not piesent were Ray Sheyer, John Lewis, Sr., 
Clayton Tiie\ and Robert Gerbcr. 



: i-. 




VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Local 106S held a dinner last year at the Redwood Inn, 
Vallejo, to present five members with 20-year membership 
pins. Left to right: C. Brat burg. R. Mcintosh, President 
Paul Kanouff, E. Burroughs, R. Stevenson, and W. Reeves. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



* ^ ♦ 




SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 

All award luncheon was given 
recently by Local 184 of Salt Lake 
City, honoring members who had 
attained 25 years of membership. 
There y\-ere two members who 
had more than 50 years of 
membership and one who was 
celebrating his 99th birthday and 
46 years membership. 

Wayne Pierce of the local 
executive hoard, assisted by 
Howard, Pace, executive secretary 
of the Utali District Council of 
Carpenters, and the officers of 
Local 184 presented pins and 
certificates to 45 members reacliing 
the 25-year inark. 

A 30-year member, Willicun S. 
Lone, acted as master of 
ceremonies. 

The table decorations and food 
were handled by Ladies Auxiliary 
No. 218, under the direction of 
Lola Meadows, president. 

The picture above shows: 

First Row: Donnel Anderson, 
Lawrence Cowan. Bert Cowlishaw, 
Marion Cox. Keith Crithfield, Otto 
Uhlig (oldest member, age 99) 
William Ilandley, and Carl R. 
■Snow. 

Second Row: Jack McKone, 
Tenny Madsen, Alton Leak, 
Benjamin F. Howells, Fenton 
Keele, Frank Oakeson, Conway 
Peart, Garth Porter, and Benjamin 
Richardson. 

Third Row: Rav Sund. Odell 
Webb, John We.ster, Kendall 
Fisher, William Askee, Oscar 
Osmiindsen, Earl Green and 
John Tamper. 



Back Row: J. Fred Meadows, 
vice-president; Lloyd Jacklin, 
M.D.T.A. instructor: Joseph W. 
Bordelon, assistant business' 
representative: William E. 
Chaplin, president: S. L. DiBclla, 
business representative: Clifford 



.4 dams, conductor; Wayne Pierce, 
General Representative; 
Howard Pace, executive secretary 
of Utah Carpenters District 
Council: William S. Lone, master of 
ceremonies; and Weldon Freeman, 
financial secretary. 




NEWARK, N J. 

Local 306 held a special called meeting. January 11, to present pins to 
members who had reached their twenty-fifth and fifieth year in the 
Brotherhood. General Representative Sigard Lucassen presented the pins. 

At the conclusion of the ceremonies a hot, buffet supper was enjoyed by 
all. Shown in the picture are: 

Front row, seated, were 50-year members, George C. Rehies, Carl Carlson, 
and Secretary-Treasurer William Piircell. Not able to attend due to illness, 
George Ringenback, Robert Allison. James Schmidt. 

Back row. General Representative Sigard Lucassen, Twenty-Five-Year 
Members Normand Alexander. Roy Herman, President Edward K. Handville, 
William McComas, Sr., Charles W. Frazer, Jr., Thomas Rudden, and 
Edward Metzger. Robert M. Smith, 31 years, and Joseph Palkovics, were 
unable to attend due to sickness. 



APRIL, 1973 



21 




MOUNTAIN VIEW, CALIF. 

iMst year. Local 1280 held its Hth Annual 25-Year 
Pin Presentation Party at Carpenters Hall, Mountain View. 
Fifty members received 25-year pins. Approximately 400 
members and guests attended the ceremonies, including 
national, state and local officials of the Brotherhood. 
The executive secretary of Santa Clara Valley District Council 
of Carpenters, John Rebeiro, made the presentations. 

Ladies Auxiliary 554 prepared a buffet dinner, which 
was followed by dancing and other festivities Each pin 
recipient received a colored picture of liimself receiving 
his pin and a picture of the group of recipients. 

From left, first row, Jesse Acosta, Bernie Turgeon, 
Michael McCarthy, Robert Urban, Art Player, Richard 



Hampton, Jr., Eli Holt, Quentin Gladdin. 

Second row, Vic Guzzi, Lew Ambra, A. A. Montano, 
Fred Reams, Joe Vavak, Max Rayburn, Jack Fetisoff, 
Virgil Stokes, Gust Berglund, Coy Hood. 

Third row, Don Lavell, John Mankin, Edgar Richardson, 
Roy Howard, Frank Kish, Fred Reiben. Leo Sausedo, 
Dale Childers. Alton Williams, James G. Bennett, Austin 
Wall, Vic Colley, Kenneth Evans, Bill Conway. 

Back row, Richard Sofge, Louis Salerno, Dale Lund, 
Vernon Shaffer, Lew Walker, Stan Mattingly, Nick 
Janovich. Roy Kramer, Bliss Reeve, Art Goforth, Bill 
Terry, Pete Orozco, George Anderson, Harden Hart and 
Fernando Cruz. 

Pins also were received by two who are not shown — 
Louis Malchaski and Valdemar Mitchalski. 



PERU, IND. 

Russell Donaldson was presented 
lu's 25-year service pin by President 
David Butcher in a special ceremony 
held by Local 932, Peru. Donaldson 
has served his local union in several 
officer capacities during liis years of 
membership. 





CLSFTON HEIGHTS, PA. 

Local 845, Norwood, Pa., held its 
annual Awards Night recently, with 
more than 300 members and their 
wives attending. 

Members with 25 years of active 
service with the union were presented 
with membership pins. 

Pictured, left to right: Douglas 
Quigg, financial secretary; Joseph 
Seafeldt, business representative 
of Delaware County and a member 
of Local 845: Arthur Price: Renzie 
Grayson; John Sherm; Cliarles 
L. Boyer, retired business repre- 
sentative and member of Local 465, 
who presented the awards; John 



Dreisback; Charles Crist; and James 
Ferguson. 

Not pictured, but receiving awards, 
were Francis Beckler, Trevor Ferris. 
Charles Grant, Wm. Kelso, Michael 
Rosenbaiim, Thomas Salamone, 
Edward Schuman, and Thomas 
Smvthe. 



SASKATOON, SASK. 

Local 1805 presented 25-year 
membership pins to six members in 
1972. They were Evan Bigelow, 
Adam Ell. Robert N. Eaket, David J. 
Hamm, John A. Stark, and John 
Tradal. 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



Anchorage, Alaska 



ANCHORAGE, ALASKA 

At a meeting in late 1972. Local 
1281 had a presentation of 25- 
ancl 30-year pins to eligible 
members. (Photo above.) 

The 30-year members, seated 
from left to right, are: Elling 
Nelson, John McDonald. B. S. 
Garris, Herbert Corder and 
Norman Craven. 

The 25-year members, standing 
from left to right, are: Floyd Ward, 
Karl Soderberg, Stanley Wilk, 
Anton Sertich, Earl Hoidder, 
Howard Flynn, Kenneth Boggs, 
Anthony J. Hcdza, Clifford Lacy, 
William Osteyee, J. C. Rohnett and 
Ray Winchester. 

OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLA. 

Local 329 members who have been 
in the United Brotherhood of 




Carpenters for 25, 30, 35, 40 and 45 
years were honored at a dinner 
dance in 1972. (See photo 
at bottom of page.) 

BELLINGHAM, WASH. 



a half century of continuous 
membership by presenting them 
with 50-year pins. 




International Rep. Paul Riidd 
presents a 30-year pin to Floyd S. 
"Shorty" Chandler of Local 1824, 
a retired piledriver who recently 
marked his 90th birthday. 

EVANSVILLE, INO. 

The Carpenters of Local 90, 
Evansville, gave a party for all 
members last December. They took 
the opportunity to present 264 pins, 
/■(Uigiiig from 25-years to 65-years 
membership in the Brotherhood. 
No. 90 had two members to receive 
their 65-year pins, also. 

GREENWICH, CONN. 

Carpenters Local 196 of Greenwich 
recently honored five members with 




Left to right are: Michael Sandor, 
Julius Hazekus, Joseph J. Quatrone 
(committee chairman, making 
presentation), Michael Castiglione. 
Not present were Hans Hansen 
and A. J. Young. 




Twenty-five-year pins were awarded 
to tlie following members of Local 
196 with a quarter century of service: 
Paul Hvidzdak. Peter Knudsen Jr.. 
Frank Koniecki. and Frank Vallario. 
Past President John Brown made 
the presentations. 

Members not present were: Frank 
M. Salerno, Arthur Schieler Jr., 
Fred Turk and Frank Zaraiiski. 



Oklahoma City, Oklo. 




APRIL, 1973 



23 



Burlington, la. 



Huntington, N Y. 




BURLINGTON, lA. 

At a recent meeting of Local 534, 
Burlington, 25-year pins were 
presented to senior members for 
faithful and continuous service to the 
BrotJierliood. Presentations were made 
by President Lyie Lubke. 

Left to right: Carl, Kinney. 25-year 
award and vice president; Edgar 
Mattson, 25-year award; E. A. Kelly, 
25-year award; Floyd Crabtree. 
business representative for Eastern 
Iowa District Council; Lewis Mehaffy, 
25-year award; and Lyle Lubke, 
president and assistant business 
representative. 

Not pictured but awarded 25-year 
pins were; Lewis C. Jennings, Robert 
D. Lindy, Lyman B. Sergeant, and 
Frank E. Winter. 



HUNTINGTON, N.Y. 

At a recent meeting of Local 1292 
25-year pins were given to those 
entitled to them. Honored were the 
following; 

Front row. left to right, Bernard 
Fuchs. business agent. Bob Deckman, 
Bert Wlieeler, Rolf Mcklin. John 
Morris, and Mike Adamo. 

Middle row. Ed Peterson, Frank 
Bitonti, Max Haller, Alfred 
Aebisher, Eric Anderson, and Philp 
Gramb. Rear row, Carl Hoschel, 
Konrad Walker, Dave Petrie, Walter 
Lockwood, James Ryan, Clarence 
De Weese, Arnold Mustis, Roy Shaw, 
and Rocco Piccininni. 



TOPEKA, KANS. 

At Local 1445's annual Christmas 
party 50 and 25-year members were 
honored with presentation of service 
pins. 

In the small picture, Morris 
Eastland, Joint Representative, 
presented a 50-year pin to 
Stephen Powell. 

In the other picture, left to right; 
Stephen Powell, 50-year pin, and 
Duane B. McClenny, Paul H. Vobach, 
Eugene Hill, Roy Schuette, 25-year 
pins. 

Members not present; Walter S. 
Adams, Normel Waldron, 50-year 
pins. Robert J. Bueltel, Clyde C. 
Lloyd, Norman O. Patterson, Philip 
V. Riley, Victor Saia, Joyce Tolin, 
25-year pins. 

Topeka, Kans. 




AUGUSTA, GA. 

Carpenters Local 283, Augusta, 
presented its eligible members with 
25-year service pins at a recent 
meeting. Representative J. G. 
Brown presented the pins. Thomas 
B. Strickland was in attendance. 

Those present to receive service 
pins are shown in the photograph, 
left to right. Rep. J. G. Brown, 
Marion C. Johnson, D. J. Clements, 
Claude Hamilton, W. G. Luther 
and Secretary-Treasurer Thomas B. 
Strickland of the Georgia State 
Council of Carpenters. 

Those awarded 25-year service 
pins who were unable to attend the 
presentation ceremony were Grady 
L. DeLaigle, Herbert G. Johnston, 
Monroe M. Prescott and Hayden 
Wright. 



HARLINGEN, TEX. 

At a special meeting, many months 
ago, 20 members of Local 2190 were 
honored for their 25 years of service. 
They included Paul Allen. R. A. 
Rodriguez, Joseph Nesetril, H. E. Dunn, 
E. T. West, Fidel Marino, A. V. Mar- 
tiniz, P. V. Martinez, C. J. Duncan, 
David Noser, L. W. Danz, F. E. Lee, 
Ruban Flores, H. E. Means, E. M. 
Allbee, A. A. Free, Ross W. Neal, Corda 
Harvey, R. L. Parker, Anibrosio Peralez, 
and Tomas Rodriqiies. 



Topeka, Kans. 



Augusta, Go. 



^ C* - 




24 



THE CARPENTER 




LOCAL UNION NEWS 



Seven Atlanta-Area Locals Form New District Council 



Seven local unions of the Atlanta. Ga., 
area recently teamed up to form the 
Carpenters District Council of Atlanta 
and Vicinity. The initial meeting was 
held October 3, 1972. 



A full slate of officers was elected, and 
the DC laid plans for coordination of 
many activities. 

General Executive Board Member 
Harold Lewis assisted in the organization. 



The local unions include: Commercial 
Local 225, Millwrights Local 1263, 
Specialties Local 3024. Residential Local 
2358, Millmen's Local 2281, Maintenance 
Local 2546, and Display Local 1229. 




Prime movers of the new council in Atlanta are sliown in the picture above. 

Front row, kneeling, John Miles, Local 225 apprenticeship coordinator; H. D. 
"Cotton" Cross of Local 225, a district council business representative; H. M. Griffith 
of Local 1263; Walter L. Smith, recording secretary, Local 3024; Kenneth Smith, 
Local 2358; L. Aubrey Morgan .fr., business representative and financial secretary 
of Local 3024 and a council trustee. 

Second row, seated, Garnett A. Root of Local 2546, council conductor; Bill Jones 
of Local 1263; Cleveland Miles of Local 2358; Int'l. Rep. .lames Golden Brown of 
Local 225; ,L F. "Bud" Cross, business representative of Local 225; J. A. "Jim" 
Brooks, Local 225; Tommy Strickland of Savannah, Ga., a Georgia State Council 
joint representative. 

Third row, standing, Luke S. Pinyan. assistant business representative of Local 225; 
William Burnett of Local 1263; James Ralcy of Local 2281; Hoyt "Buddy" Love of 
Local 1229 and council warden; C. E. Primer, financial secretary of Local 2281; 
Samuel T. Welder, fringe benefits coordinator for Local 225; U. R. "Red" Bolton of 
Local 2281 and vice president of the council; Herschel H. Smith, president of Local 
3024; and Luther Bailey, business representative of Local 2358 and a council trustee. 

Back row, standing, Leroy Robinson, Local 225; Ralph Hubbard of Local 225; 
David Bryant. Local 2546; Raymond E. Pressley, Local 1225. executive secretary- 
treasurer of the council; Carl G. Green, Local 1263 and council trustee; Thomas F. 
Calhoon, Local 225; J. W. Pruitt, Jr.. assistant business representative of Local 225; 
Herbert H. Mabry. president of Local 225. president of the Georgia State AFL-CIO 
and president of the new council; General Executive Board Member Harold E. 
Lewis; Gene Collins, president of Local 2358; J. V. ".lake" Edmonson, recording 
secretary of Local 225; and Lewis John Beneficid of Local 2358. 




Fourth District Executive Board Mem- 
ber Harold E. Lowis as he presented the 
gavel of the new Carpenters District 
Council of Atlanta & Vicinity to Herbert 
H. Mabry. council president. Mabry is 
President of Local No. 225. .4tlanta, 
and of the Georgia State AFL-CIO. 



APRIL, 1973 



25 



First Pension Checks for Three North Texas Local Unions 



Three Texas local unions — ^Local 198, 
Dallas; 1526 Denton; and 1822 Fort 
Worth — gave out their first pension 
checks recently. 

The checks were retroactive to May 1, 
1972, resulting from a negotiated agree- 
ment between North Texas Contractors 
Association and Carpenters District Coun- 
cil of North Central Texas. 

A highlight of the ceremonies was the 
attendance of F. C. Hughes, who was 100 
years old the following day and is a 70- 
year member of the Brotherhood. (All 
of those years, except a few months, have 
been in Local 198, Dallas.) 

The activities began with a luncheon 
for the oldest member in age and mem- 
bership from each local, honored with 
their ladies. After the luncheon, they 
joined a large group of other co-recipients 
for the initial pension ceremonies at the 
University of Texas Auditorium at Arling- 
ton, Texas. 

The members representing the oldest in 
age were F. C. Hughes, 100-years young 
from Local 198; John Speak, who is 79 
years old, from Local 1526, Denton; and 
Carlos Jones, age 88, from Local 1822, 
Fort Worth. 

The member representing the oldest in 
service from Local 198 was Brother 
Hughes and, since he held both of these 
records, he was hard to top in either 
category. Thorstain H. Grann, with 63 
years of service in the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters, was chosen for the 
runner-up for Local 198. Elton Ferguson 
is a 47-year member of Local 1526; and 
R. E. Adams is a 56-year member of 
Local 1822. There were over 400 eligible 
for pensions at this kickoff ceremony. 
Brother Hughes received Check No. 1. 

Those attending from the United Bro- 
therhood of Carpenters were Fred Bull, 
General Executive Board Member, who 
addressed the pensioners; General Rep- 
resentative Chester Smith; Director of 
the Southwest Organizing Office. G. H. 
Simmons, Jr.; and Secretary of the Texas 
State Council of Carpenters, A. C. Shirley. 

Contractors invited who were in at- 
tendance were Maurice Wooten, president 
of North Texas Contractors Association; 
Harold Moore, manager of the North 
Texas Contractors Association; Sandy 
Hallman of Hallman and Hallman Con- 
struction Company, and Bill Cadenhead, 
president of Fort Worth AGC. 

The presentation was sponsored by the 
trustees of the pension plan, representing 
the three locals mentioned above and the 
North Texas Contractors Association 

The trustees from Management are; 
Hugh Welch, manager of Fort Worth 
AGC; E. B. Keeter, vice president of 
Butcher and Sweeney; James M. Walker, 
Walker Construction Company; Chuck 
Kugler, president of Dallas AGC and 
Kugler & Morris Construction Company; 
George Emerson of Robert E. McKee 
Construction Company; and Lamar Jor- 
dan with Schwartz-Jordan Company. 

The trustees from the United Brother- 




Management representatives included: W. H. Taylor, A. J. Christian, Melvln Butler, 
E. B. Keeter, J. T. Averitt, Calvin Daniel, and Bill Watkins. 




The oldest members of each local union who received pension checks included, 
left to right: Joe Younghlood, 85 years old, was an alternate to Carlos Jones; Carlos 
H. Jones, 88 years old and a 32-year member of Local 1822; Elton Ferguson, 65 
years old and a 47-year member of Local 1526; John Speak, 79 years old and a 20- 
year member of Local 1526; F. C. Hughes, 100 years old and a 70-year member of 
Local 198; R. E. Adams, 87 years old and a 56-year member of Local 1822; Thorstain 
H. Grann, 84 years old and a 63-year member of Local 198. 



hood of Carpenters are Calvin Daniel 
and Bill Watkins, business representatives 
of Local 198, Dallas; W. H. Taylor, 
business representative of Local 1526, 
Denton; J. T. Averitt, business represen- 
tative of Local 1822, Fort Worth; Melvin 
Butler, financial secretary of Local 1822, 
Fort Worth; and A. J. Christian, execu- 
tive secretary of Carpenters District 
Council of North Central Texas. 

E. B. Keeter was the only manage- 
ment trustee present. Others in attendance 
were N. J. Hardeman, business represent- 
ative of Local 198; A. C. Fielder, Jr., 
president of Local 198; J. M. Brownlee, 
business representative of Local 1822; 
and J. P. Long, Jr., business representa- 
tive for Carpenters District Council of 
North Central Texas. 

'Gold Hex' Offer 
For Oiu* Readers 

In the February issue of The Carpen- 
ter we reviewed a new book by Ken 
Marquiss entitled The Gold Hex, about 
searching for lost treasures in the West. 

Marquiss. a member of Local 944, San 
Bernardino, Calif., has received many 
calls from fellow members asking for 
the price of his book and how to order 
it. 



The regular price of the book is $5.00, 
but the publisher is offering a reduced 
price to Brotherhood members and Car- 
penter readers of S4.00. If you'd like a 
copy at the reduced price, send $4.00 
with your order to H. Glenn Carson 
Enterprises, Inc., 801 Juniper Ave., 
Boulder, Colo. 80302. and mention that 
you are a member of the Brotherhood. 

Missing Person 

Steven Chait has been missing from 
his dormitory at Columbia University in 
New York City since March 13, 1972. 
His despairing par- 
ents have asked the 
New York Council 
of Carpenters and 
the Brotherhood to 
join other elements 
of the labor move- 
ment to join in the 
search for him. 
He's white, 20 
years old, 5'10", 155 lbs., medium build, 
fair complexion, brown hair, green eyes, 
wears glasses, mustache and possible 
beard. If you have information, notify 
the Missing Persons Unit in New York 
City or Mr. and Mrs. Harry Chait, 65-24 
—162nd Street, Flushing, N.Y. 11365. 




CHAIT 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



Centenarians Celebrate Birthdays 



Dallas Carpenter 
Into Second Centm-y 

The Ladies Auxiliary of Carpenters 
Local 198, Dallas, Texas, gave a surprise 
party, last October, for Forrest C. 
Hughes . . . and he deserved every joy- 
ful minute of it. 

Hughes, a 70-year member of the 
Brotherhood, had just reached his lOOth 
birthday. As one of the ladies said, 
Hughes was now "out of the dangerous 
90's" and into his second century. 

He started off his second hundred years 
right by receiving, recently. Pension 
Check No. 1 from the North Texas 
Carpenters Pension Program, which 
amounted to $500. (See the story on 
Page 26.) 

Hughes didn't retire from union v/ork 
until July. 1971, shortly before his 99th 
birthday. He served as local treasurer for 
30 years, between 1941 and 1971. He 
was, at one time, the local's first appren- 
ticeship instructor, and many journeymen 
today in Local 198 trace their craft skills 
to his early instruction. 

There were no paved streets in big and 
booming Dallas when Hughes came to 
town in 1902. He installed woodwork in 
the city's "tall" building, the Praetorian 
Building, which was first in the city with 
a steel framework and which still stands 
at 1607 Main Street. He remembers, too, 
when Dallas was a muddy little river 
town "with saloons and cowboys on 
nearly every corner." 

Gustav Olsen Marks 
His 100th Birthday 

March 8. 1973, was no ordinary day 
for Gustav Olsen of Dock Builders Local 
1456 of New York City. He commemor- 
ated his 100th birthday on that day, 
sharing it with his proud wife and many 
well-wishers. 

Olsen joined the trade in 1893, when 



Acquire 
The Achievers. 

Hire 
TheDisabled 

TETERAN 




F. C. Hughes and A. J. Christian, sec- 
retary, Carpenters District Council of 
Dallas at recent pension ceremonies. 




i 



Mr. and Mrs. Gustav Olsen at home. 

wages were $1.75 per day for 10 hours 
of work, six days a week. He recalls 
helping to organize a local union in 
1906. when charter members "each 
chipped in a dollar to get things started." 

He joined Local 1456 on December 
27. 1917. retiring from active work 25 
years ago. However, he continued to 
be an active member, and in 1967, at 
the age of 94. he drove his own car to 
the local union office on Manhattan to 
receive his 50-year gold membership pin. 

Olsen worked for 40 years with Henry 
.Steers, Inc., starting as a piledriver cap- 
tain, eventually advancing to general 
foreman. 

Mr. and Mrs. Olsen live in their own 
home in Newton, N.J. 

Fewer Hom-s, But 
Not Shorter Hours 

An anonymous reader has corrected 
our word usage in a recent issue. He 
writes: 

"You said. 'We work shorter hours, 
etc.,' in your article. 

"All hours have 60 minutes. We have 
no shorter ones. There are no 59-minute 
ones. 

"We can work Mess' hours or 'fewer' 
hours, but we cannot work 'shorter' 
hours." 

We stand corrected. 



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APRIL, 1973 



27 




Texas and Oklahoma officers and shop stewards take time out from a ijusy conference for a picture. 

Industrial Organizing Conference in Dallas Plans Volunteer Programs 



The Brotherhood's Southwest Organiz- 
ing Office launched a person-to-person, 
volunteer industrial organizing drive 
recently when it brought together more 
than 80 local union officers and shop 
stewards for an industrial organizing and 
training conference. 

The participants came from local 
unions of Texas and Oklahoma. They 
assembled at the Holiday Inn, Market 



Center. Dallas. Texas, for three days of 
intensive study and preparation for the 
organizing program planned for 1973. 

The conference was assembled by G. 
H. Simmons. Jr.. director of the South- 
west Organizing Office. Working with 
him were Dick Middleton. assistant to 
the Brotherhood's Director of Organiza- 
tion: General Representative Leonard 
Zimmerman: and Nick Kurko, director 



of Region 17, AFL-CIO. 

Speakers included Marvin Menaker, 
Dallas attorney; Representatives Al 
Spring. W. C. Cleveland, and Al Cortez; 
plus various panelists. 

At the conclusion of the conference 
each participant was designated "Volun- 
teer organizer" of the Brotherhood and 
presented with cards testifying to this 
fact. 



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28 



THE CARPENTER 



L.-^^]fe^^^/; 




Apprentices in Portsmouth, Ohio 





A recent apprentice class at Local 437, Portsmouth, O. First row, left to riglit: 
Norman Cave, Terry Brewer, Ricliard Snyder, Charles E. Vanderpool, Coordinator, 
Larry Gullett, Charles Seibert, Steven Carter, and Ralph ClilTord. Second row. left 
to right: Robert Brewer, Ronald Syroncy, John Welch, Richard Stapleton. Marion 
D. Russell, Ronald Ward, Freddy Wolfe, and Charles E. Vanderpool, Jr. 



Member Tells of 
Tool from the Past 

What is it? 

That's the question Victor Ritchie of 
Fifestone. Colo., asked himself while 
vacationing in Pennington Gap, Va. 

The answer: It's a tool belonging to 
Jaris Catron of that community which 
has been in the Catron family since it 
was bought new, back in the early 
1900's. The legend on the tool head 
reads: "Pat. May 21. 1901. Territories 
for sale by S. J. Johnston, Leesburg, Va., 
F. Lowentrout Mfg. Co., Newark, N.J." 

Ritchie, a member of Local 1289, 
Seattle. Wash., says its a composite of 
the following basic tools — a he.x-nut 
wrench, a pipe wrench, a bit brace, and 
a screwdriver. 



PLAN AHEAD — The 1973 International Carpenters Apprenticeship Contest 
will be held in Omaha, Nebraska. Ait:^ust 22-25. Contest headquarters will he 
the Omaha Hilton Hotel. (See Slate Apprenticeship Contests Calendar, Page 37.) 



James Cooper, financial secretary and 
business agent of Local 437, Portsmouth, 
O.. presents John McDowell with a plaque 
for the highest grade in the local fourth- 
year apprentice program. 



Tool together, above; separated, below. 





Hersbell Gullett, president of Local 
437. presents his son. Larry, with a plaque 
for the highest grade in the second-year 
apprentice program. 



TOOL TALK 


by Jones 


5^ 


fr^D 


^[T^ 


Get lost! 'Vou don't belong in 
joints like that! 



APRIL, 1973 



29 





1 


PHRHjj 


1 


^■^■^1 i ■** A-AB: I ^ ^^.^^H 



Local City & State 



Local 
Union 
Contri- 
butions 



Con- 
vention 
Contri- 
butions Total 



cue Report for the Year 1972 



Local City & State 



Local 
Union 
Contri- 
butions 



Con- 
vention 
Contri- 
butions 



Total Local City & State 



ALABAMA 

103 Birmingham 43.00 
2429 Ft. Payne 5.00 



43.00 
5.00 





ALASKA 






1243 Fairbanks 


180.00 




180.00 


1281 Anchorage 


86.00 




86.00 


2362 Wrangell 


ARIZONA 


20.00 


20.00 


221 Morenci 


15.00 




15.00 


445 Kingman 


20.00 




20.00 


857 Tucson 


162.50 




162.50 


906 Glendale 


37.00 




37.00 


1089 Phoenix 


53.00 




53.00 


1100 Flagstaff 

i 


25.00 
ARKANSAS 




25.00 


71 Fort Smith 




5.00 


5.00 


576 Pine Bluff 




1.00 


1.00 


690 Little Rock 




5.00 


5.00 


891 Hot Springs 


10.00 


2.00 


12.00 


1249 Fayetteville 


20.00 




20.00 


1470 Conway 




2.00 


2.00 


1683 El Dorado 


11.00 


5.00 


16.00 


1722 Arkadelphia 




1.00 


1.00 


1836 Russellville 




2.00 


2.00 


2045 Helena 




1.00 


1.00 


2697 Magnolia 




1.00 


1.00 


CALIFORNIA 






25 Los Angeles 


1,000.00 


50.00 


1,050.00 


34 San Francisco 60.00 


70.00 


130.00 


35 San Rafael 




10.00 


10.00 


36 Oakland 


21.00 


40.00 


61.00 


42 San Franciscc 


) 40.00 


10.00 


50.00 


102 Oakland 




60.00 


60.00 


162 San Mateo 


51.00 




51.00 


180 Vallejo 


85.50 


40.00 


125.50 


235 Riverside 




30.00 


30.00 


262 San Jose 


25.00 




25.00 


266 Stockton 




20.00 


20.00 


300 Ventura 




20.00 


20.00 


316 San Jose 


14.00 


80.00 


94.00 


354 Gilroy 




10.00 


10.00 


386 San Andreas 




10.00 


10.00 


478 Oakland 


10.00 




10.00 


483 San Franciscc 


1 1,349.50 


30.00 


1,379.50 


530 Los Angeles 


35.00 


10.00 


45.00 


550 Oakland 




20.00 


20.00 


586 Sacramento 


875.50 


35.00 


910.50 


642 Richmond 


10.00 


40.00 


50.00 


668 Palo Alto 


10.00 


10.00 


20.00 


701 Fresno 


64.00 


30.00 


94.00 


710 Long Beach 


11.00 


40.00 


51.00 



Local 
Union 
Contri- 
butions 



721 

743 

751 

769 

771 

829 

844 

848 

925 

929 

944 

946 

1046 

1051 

1052 

1062 

1109 

1113 

1125 

1140 

1147 

1149 

1158 

1205 

1235 

1280 

1288 

1296 

1300 

1323 

1335 

1358 

1381 

1400 

1407 

1408 

1418 

1437 

1453 

1473 
1478 
1490 
1495 
1496 
1497 
1506 
1507 
1570 
1571 
1599 
1607 
1618 
1622 
1632 



Los Angeles 

Bakersfield 

Santa Rosa 

Pasadena 

Watsonville 

Santa Cruz 

Reseda 

San Bruno 

Salinas 

Los Angeles 

San Bernardino 

Los Angeles 

Palm Springs 

Sacramento 

Hollywood 

Santa Barbara 

Visalia 

San Bernardino 

Los Angeles 

San Pedro 

Roseville 

San Francisco 

Berkeley 

Indio 

Modesto 

Mt. View 

Chico 

San Diego 

San Diego 

Monterey 

Wilmington 

La Jolla 

Woodland 

Santa Monica 

San Pedro 

Redwood City 

Lodi 

Compton 

Huntington 

Beach 

Oakland-Fritville 

Redondo 

San Diego 

Chico 

Fresno 

E. Los Angeles 

Los Angeles 

El Monte 

Marysville 

E. San Diego 

Redding 

Los Angeles 

Sacramento 

Hayward 

St. Luis Obispo 



Con- 
vention 
Contri- 
butions Total 



6.00 



20.00 



11.00 

6.00 

10.00 



20.00 

26.00 

3.00 

20.00 

68.00 
40.00 
20.00 
25.00 
20.00 
15.00 
30.00 



7.00 

21.00 

47.00 

11.00 

172.00 

129.00 
20.00 
21.00 

10.00 

130.00 
21.00 

9.00 
100.00 



20.00 



40.00 

41.00 
20.00 



40.00 
40.00 
40.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
50.00 
30.00 
20.00 
20.00 
110.00 
20.00 
20.00 
10.00 
40.00 
30.00 
20.00 
10.00 
20.00 
30.00 

35.00 
11.00 
10.00 
20.00 
20.00 
25.00 
20.00 
10.00 
50.00 

40.00 

50.00 
20.00 
40.00 
30.00 
30.00 

45.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.50 
20.00 
20.00 
40.00 
60.00 
20.00 
30.00 
10.00 
50.00 
30.00 
60.00 
20.00 



40.00 
40.00 
46.00 
10.00 
30.00 
10.00 
50.00 
41.00 
26.00 
30.00 

110.00 
20.00 
20.00 
30.00 
40.00 
56.00 
23.00 
30.00 
20.00 
98.00 
40.00 
55.00 
36.00 
30.00 
35.00 
50.00 
25.00 
20.00 
10.00 
57.00 
21.00 
87.00 
11.00 

222.00 
20.00 

169.00 
50.00 
51.00 

55.00 
30.00 

160.00 
51.00 
30.50 
29.00 

120.00 
40.00 
60.00 
40.00 
30.00 
10.00 
90.00 
30.00 

101.00 
40.00 



1848 
1662 
1752 
1789 
1815 
1861 
1869 
1903 
1913 
1930 
1959 
1976 
1992 
2006 
2015 
2020 
2042 
2046 
2048 
2078 
2095 
2114 
2164 
2170 
2172 
2185 
2203 
2288 
2308 
2341 
2361 
2375 
2398 
2435 
2463 
2505 
2559 
2561 
2592 
2608 
2652 
2665 
2687 
2688 
2749 
2762 
2789 
2808 
2882 
2907 
2927 
3074 
3088 
3170 
3184 



Laguma Beach 

Van Nuys 

Pomona 

Bijou 

Santa Ana 

Milpitas 

Menteca 

Grass Valley 

San Fernando 

Santa Susana 

Riverside 

Los Angeles 

Placerville 

Los Gatos 

Santa Paula 

San Diego 

Oxnard 

Martinez 

Corona 

Vista 

San Rafael 

Napa 

San Francisco 

Sacramento 

Santa Ana 

A. V. Palmdale 

Anaheim 

Los Angeles 

Fullerton 

Willits 

Garden Grove 

Los Angeles 

El Cajon 

Inglewood 

Ventura 

Klamath 

San Francisco 

Fresh Pond 

Eureka 

Redding 

Standard 

Santa Ana 

Auburn 

Elk Creek 

Camino 

North Fork 

Circata 

Areata 

Santa Rosa 

Weed 

Martell 

Chester 

Stockton 

Sacramento 

Fresno 



22.00 
70.00 



7.00 
43.00 
13.00 



2.50 

117.00 

20.00 

13.00 

33.00 



39.00 
5.00 
40.00 
98.00 
20.00 



10.00 
3.00 

41.00 
7.00 



28.00 



1.00 
20.00 



30.00 
20.00 
40.00 
10.00 
45.00 
20.00 
10.00 
10.00 
50.00 
10.00 
60.00 
20.00 

20.00 
10.00 
15.00 
40.00 
30.00 
10.00 
30.00 
20.00 
10.00 
20.00 
60.00 
50.00 
20.00 
60.00 
45.00 
45.00 
30.00 
30.00 
90.00 
30.00 
40.00 
40.00 
20.00 
20.00 
10.00 
30.00 
80.00 
10.00 
50.00 
20.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
20.00 
10.00 
20.00 
70.00 
10.00 
20.00 
20.00 
30.00 
20.00 



55 Denver 

244 Grand Junction 

362 Pueblo 

1351 Leadville 

1396 Golden 

1480 Boulder 

1583 Englewood 

2249 Adams County 



COLORADO 

23.00 
22.50 
10.00 
10.00 
30.00 
14.00 
23.00 
17.00 



CONNECTICUT 

30 New London 42.00 100.00 
43 Hartford 734.00 190.00 

79 New Haven 114.00 60.00 
97 New Britain 40.00 90.00 



30.00 
20.00 
62.00 
10.00 

115.00 
20.00 
10.00 
10.00 
50.00 
10.00 
67.00 
63.00 
13.00 
20.00 
10.00 
15.00 
42.50 

147.00 
30.00 
43.00 
20.00 
43.00 
20.00 
60.00 
89.00 
25.00 

100.00 

143.00 
65.00 
30.00 
30.00 

100.00 
33.00 
81.00 
47.00 
20.00 
20.00 
10.00 
30.00 
80.00 
10.00 
50.00 
48.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
20.00 
10.00 
21.00 
90.00 
10.00 
20.00 
20.00 
30.00 
20.00 



23.00 
22.50 
10.00 
10.00 
30.00 
14.00 
23.00 
17.00 



142.00 
924.00 
174.00 
130.00 



30 



THE CARPENTER 





Local 


Con- 








Local 


Con- 






Union 


vention 








Union 


vention 






Contri- 


Contri- 








Contri- 


Contri- 




Local City & State 


butions 


butions 


Total 


Local 


City & State 


butions 


butions 


Total 


115 Bridgeport 




90.00 


90.00 






IDAHO 






127 Derby 




15.00 


15.00 


609 


Idaho Falls 


51.00 




51.00 


196 Greenwich 


80.00 


25.00 


105.00 


635 


Boise 


6.00 




6.00 


210 Stamford 


40.00 




40.00 


1258 


Pocatello 


40.00 




40.00 


216 Torrlngton 




5.00 


5.00 


2257 


Ashahka 




30.00 


30.00 


260 Waterbury 


40.00 


10.00 


50.00 


2816 


Emmett 




30.00 


30.00 


647 Fairfield 
825 Wllllmantic 




15.00 
40.00 


15.00 
40.00 






ILLINOIS 






927 Danbury 




30.00 


30.00 


1 


Chicago 


197.00 


60.00 


257.00 


1520 Bridgeport 


20.00 




20.00 


10 


Chicago 


60.00 




60.00 


1941 Hartford 


14.00 




14.00 


13 


Chicago 


146.00 


60.00 


206.00 


626 Wilmington 


DELAWARE 

15.00 




15.00 


16 
21 
44 


Springfield 

Chicago 

Chamoalsn 


1,024.00 
7.00 


40.00 
20.00 


1,064.00 
27.00 


1545 Wilmington 
2012 Seaford 


20.00 
16.00 




20.00 
16.00 


(Urba) 
58 Chicago 


66.00 
1,512.00 


60.00 
70.00 


126.00 
1,582.00 


WASHINGTON, D.C. 




62 


Chicago 


236.00 


40.00 


276.00 


132 Wash., DC. 

528 Wash., D.C. 
1145 Wash., D.C. 
1590 Wash., D.C. 
1631 Wash., D.C. 
1694 Wash., D.C. 
1831 Wash., D.C. 
2311 Wash., D.C. 
2456 Wash., D.C. 


702.22 = 
6.00 
164.84* 
843.47* 
205.84* 

23.50 
112.42* 
383.44* 

20.00 




702.22 
6.00 
164.84 
843.47 
205.84 

23.50 
112.42 
383.44 

20.00 


63 Bloomington 
80 Chicago 
141 Chicago 
166 Rock Island 
169 E. St. Louis 
174 Jollet 
181 Chicago 
183 Peoria 
189 Quincy 
195 Peru 


3.00 
978.00 

11.00 

50.00 

337.50 

178.00 

40.00 


40.00 
80.00 
20.00 
40.00 
60.00 
20.00 
20.00 
100.00 
20.00 
20.00 


43.00 

1,058.00 

20.00 

51.00 

110.00 

357.50 

198.00 

100.00 

60.00 

20.00 




FLORIDA 






199 


Chicago 


25.00 


40.00 


65.00 


405 Miami 


180.00 


80.00 


260.00 


241 


Mollne 




40.00 


40.00 


531 St. Petersbu 


rg 


10.00 


10.00 


242 


Chicago 


83.00 


70.00 


153.00 


627 Jacksonville 




105.00 


105.00 


269 


Danville 




20.00 


20.00 


696 Tampa 


60.00 


80.00 


140.00 


272 Chicago Hgts 


38.00 


80.00 


118.00 


727 HIaleah 




50.00 


50.00 


295 


Collinsvllle 




40.00 


40.00 


819 W. Palm Beach 66.00 


75.00 


141.00 


341 


Chicago 


10.00 




10.00 


959 Boynton 


1.00 




1.00 


347 


Mattoon 


41.00 


80.00 


121.00 


993 Miami 


120.00 


30.00 


150.00 


360 


Galesburg 




20.00 


20.00 


1250 Homestead 


143.00 


50.00 


193.00 


363 


Elgin 




60.00 


60.00 


1275 Clearwater 




10.00 


10.00 


367 


Centralia 




20.00 


20.00 


1308 Lake Worth 


28.00 


50.00 


78.00 


416 


Chicago 




20.00 


20.00 


1379 N. Miami 


40.00 


40.00 


80.00 


419 


Chicago 


40.00 


60.00 


100.00 


1394 Ft. Lauderdale 60.00 


90.00 


150.00 


433 


Belleville 




80.00 


80.00 


1447 Vero Beach 




20.00 


20.00 


434 


Chicago 


152.00 


60.00 


212.00 


1509 Miami 


50.00 


70.00 


120.00 


448 


Waukegan 


50.00 


30.00 


80.00 


1510 Tampa 


21.00 


10.00 


31.00 


461 


HIghwood 


57.00 


50.00 


107.00 


1554 Miami 


10.00 


20.00 


30.00 


480 


Freeburg 


40.00 


40.00 


80.00 


1685 Pineda 


41.00 




41.00 


496 


Kankakee 


40.00 


40.00 


80.00 


1765 Orlando 


41.00 




41.00 


504 


Chicago 


20.00 




20.00 


1766 Boca Raton 


120.00 


10.00 


130.00 


558 


Elmhurst 


34.00 


60.00 


94,00 


1927 Delray Beac 


h 


10.00 


10.00 


568 


Lincoln 


40.00 




40.00 


1947 Hollywood 


300.00 


105.00 


405.00 


633 


Madison 




40.00 


40.00 


1966 Miami 




30.00 


30.00 


644 


Pekin 


247.00 


30.00 


277.00 


2024 Miami 


208.00 


10.00 


218.00 


661 


Ottav^a 


11.00 


20.00 


31.00 


2217 Lakeland 


40.00 




40.00 


695 


Sterling 


6.00 


20.00 


26.00 


2292 Ocala 


2.00 




2.00 


725 


Litchfield 




22.00 


22.00 


2340 Bradenton 


15.00 




15.00 


742 


Decatur 


6.00 


20.00 


26.00 


2376 Sanford 


20.00 




20.00 


792 


Rockford 


40.00 


20.00 


60.00 


2795 Ft. Lauderd 


ale 61.25 


80.00 


141.25 


812 


Cairo 




20.00 


20.00 


3206 Pompano 








839 


Des Plaines 


1,431.00 


80.00 


1,511.00 


Beach 


186.00 


75.00 


261.00 


841 


Carbondale 




20.00 


20.00 




GEORGIA 






904 
916 


Jacksonville 
Aurora 




20.00 
100.00 


20.00 
100.00 


144 Macon 


20.00 


60.00 


80.00 


965 


Dekalb 




20.00 


20,00 


225 Atlanta 


80.00 


185.00 


265.00 


999 


Mt. Vernon 


20.00 




20.00 


256 Savannah 
283 Augusta 


50.00 
20.00 


65.00 
85.00 


115.00 
105.00 


1045 
1092 


Chicago 
Marseilles 


5.00 


20.00 
20.00 


20.00 
25.00 


547 Athens 
1263 Atlanta 
1723 Columbus 
3265 Albany 


10.33 
20.00 


20.00 
60.00 
25.00 


10.33 
40.00 
60,00 
25.00 


1128 La Grange 10.0 
1185 Chicago 41.00 
1196 Arlington Hgts. 5.00 
1248 Geneva 


20.00 
80.00 
40.00 
10.00 


30.00 

121.00 

45.00 

10.00 




HAWAII 






1307 


Evanston 


41.00 


60.00 


101.00 


745 Honolulu 


50.00 




50.00 


1361 


Chester 


20.00 


20.00 


40.00 



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1. Irwin Speedbor "88" for oil elecfric drills. 
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31 



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Local 


Con- 






Local 


Con- 






Union 


vention 






Union 


vention 






Contri- 


Contri- 






Contri- 


Contri- 




Local City & State 


butions 


butions 


Total 


Local City&SUte 


butions 


butions 


ToUl 


1367 Chicago 


40.00 




40.00 




KANSAS 






1527 Wheaton 




40.00 


40.00 


168 Kansas City 


18.00 


45.00 


63.00 


1539 Chicago 


20.00 




20.00 


201 Wichita 


15.00 


45.00 


60.00 


1693 Chicago 




20.00 


20.00 


499 Leavenworth 


10.00 


15.00 


25.00 


1784 Chicago 


35.00 


40.00 


75.00 


561 Pittsburg 




80.00 


80.00 


1883 Downers 


15.00 


20.00 


35.00 


714 Olathe 


14.00 


50.00 


64.00 


1889 Downers Grovf 


100.00 


80.00 


180.00 


750 Junction City 




10.00 


10.00 


1922 Chicago 


147.00 




147.00 


918 Manhattan 




10.00 


10.00 


1996 Libertyville 


40.00 


70.00 


110.00 


1022 Parsons 


6.00 


15.00 


21.00 


2014 Barrington 


100.00 


60.00 


160.00 


1224 Emporia 


20.00 


15.00 


35.00 


2063 Lacon 


20.00 




20.00 


1445 Topeka 


5.00 


100.00 


105.00 


2087 Crystal Lalte 


19.00 


20.00 


39.00 


1529 Kansas City 




75.00 


75.00 


2094 Chicago 


29.00 


40.00 


69.00 


1587 Hutchison 


3.00 


10.00 


13.00 


2158 Rock Island 




60.00 


60.00 


1724 Liberal 


40.00 


10.00 


50.00 


3273 OIney 


1.00 


10.00 


11.00 


2279 Lawrence 




25.00 


25.00 


INDIANA 






KENTUCKY 






60 Indianapolis 




115.00 


115.00 


64 Louisville 


50.00 




50.00 


90 Evansville 




20.00 


20.00 


712 Covington 


25.00 




25.00 


133 Terre Haute 


31.00 


40.00 


71.00 


785 Covington 


76.00 




76.00 


215 Lafayette 


41.00 




41.00 


1080 Owensboro 


47.00 




47.00 


232 Fort Wayne 


45.00 


45.00 


90.00 


2049 Gilbertsville 


23.00 




23.00 


274 Vincennes 


20.00 


30.00 


50.00 


2058 Frankfort 


11.00 




11.00 


352 Anderson 




25.00 


25.00 










365 Marlon 




10.00 


10.00 


LOUISIANA 






413 South Bend 




25.00 


25.00 


764 Shreveport 


10.00 




10.00 


436 New Albany 




10.00 


10.00 


953 Lake Charles 


40.00 




40.00 


533 Jeffersonvllle 




45.00 


45.00 


1098 Baton Rouge 


22.00 




22.00 


565 Elkhart 


9.00 


25.00 


34.00 


1312 New Orleans 


20.00 




20.00 


588 Montezuma 




30.00 


30.00 


1811 Monroe 


20.00 




20.00 


592 Muncle 




35.00 


35.00 


1846 New Orleans 


219.00 




219.00 


599 Hammond 


21.00 


80.00 


101.00 


1897 Lafayette 


83.00 




83.00 


694 Boonville 


41.00 


25.00 


66.00 


2258 Houma 


42.00 




42.00 


734 Kokomo 




35.00 


35.00 


2436 New Orleans 


17.00 




17.00 


758 Indianapolis 


1.00 


80.00 


81.00 










912 Richmond 




10.00 


10.00 




MAINE 






934 New Albany 


7.50 




7.50 


320 Augusta 











1005 Merrillville 




105.00 


105.00 


407 Lewiston 











1076 Washington 


20.00 




20.00 


459 Bar Harbor 











1142 Lawrenceburg 




15.00 


15.00 


517 Portland 











1217 Greencastle 




30.00 


30.00 


621 Bangor 











1350 Seymour 


11.00 


10.00 


21.00 


658 Millinocket 











1355 Crawfordsville 




15.00 


15.00 


M 


snwi Bftin 






1485 La Porte 


16.00 


65.00 


81.00 


MHniLAnu 






1664 Bloomlngton 


2.00 


10.00 


12.00 


101 Baltimore 


3.00 




3.00 


1858 Lowell 


20.00 


25.00 


45.00 


340 Hagerstown 


20.00 




20.00 


1899 Hobart 


22.00 




22.00 


1024 Cumberland 


42.00 




42.00 


2395 Lebanon 




20.00 


20.00 


1126 Annapolis 


52.00 




52.00 


2441 Corydon 




35.00 


35.00 


MASSACHUSETTS 




2548 Peru 


1.00 




1.00 










2601 Lafayette 
2656 Rensselaer 




75.00 
20.00 


75.00 
20.00 


32 Springfield 

33 Boston 


179.00 
300.00 




179.00 
300.00 


2748 Rensselaer 




20.00 


20.00 


40 Boston 


300.00 




300.00 


2793 Indianapolis 




20.00 


20.00 


48 Fitchburg 


34.00 




34.00 


2818 Montlcello 




20.00 


20.00 


49 Lowell 


108.75 




108.75 


2842 Frankfort 




20.00 


20.00 


56 Boston 


20.00 




20.00 


3000 Crown Point 




35.00 


35.00 


67 Boston 


90.00 




90.00 


3154 Montlcello 


33.00 


40.00 


73.00 


82 Haverhill 


27.00 




27.00 


3210 Madison 




10.00 


10.00 


107 Worcester 


60.00 




60.00 


3228 Winchester 


31.00 




31.00 


111 Lawrence 


21.00 




21.00 


3241 Covington 


7.00 


10.00 


17.00 


193 North Adams 
218 Boston 


40.00 
280.00 




40.00 
280.00 




IOWA 






327 Attleboro 




15.00 


15.00 


4 Davenport 


85.00 




85.00 


390 Holyoke 
444 Pittsfield 


20.00 
16.00 




20.00 
16.00 


106 Des Moines 


103.25 




103.25 


595 Lynn 
624 Brockton 


45.00 




45.00 


308 Cedar Rapids 


110.00 




110.00 


90.00 




90.00 


373 Fort Madison 


9.00 




9.00 


656 Holyoke 


16.00 




16.00 


534 Burlington 


14.00 




14.00 


860 Framingham 


60.00 




60.00 


937 Dubuque 


20.00 




20.00 


885 Woburn 


20.00 




20.00 


1260 Iowa City 


21.00 




21.00 


1035 Faunton 


60.00 




60.00 


1948 Ames 


15.00 




15.00 


1121 Boston (Vic.) 


100.00 




100.00 



32 



THE CARPENTER 





Local 
Union 
Contri- 


Con- 
vention 
Contri- 








Local 
Union 
Contri- 


Con- 
vention 
Contri- 




LAYOUT LEVEL 


Local City & State 


butions 


butions 


Total 


Local City & State 


butions 


butions 


Total 


, ACCURATE TO 1/32° 


MICHIGAN 








MONTANA 






^^^^ 


* REACHES 100 FT. 


19 Detroit 


10.00 




10.00 


88 Anaconda 


10.00 




10.00 




t ONE-MAN OPERATION 


100 Muskegon 


10.00 


10.00 


20.00 


153 


Helena 


20.00 




20.00 


Sove Time, Money, do a Belter Job 


116 Bay City 


6.00 


40.00 


46.00 


286 


Great Falls 


37.00 




37.00 


^^■~— ^ Willi This Modern Woler Level 


297 Kalamazoo 


55.00 


80.00 


135.00 


557 


Bozeman 


11,00 




11.00 


In just a few minutes you accurately set batters 


334 Saginaw 


51.00 


40.00 


91.00 


1172 


Billings 


19.00 




19.00 


for slabs and footings, lay out inside floors, 


335 Grand Rapids 


10.00 


40.00 


50.00 


2405 


Kalispell 




10.00 


10.00 


ceilings, forms, fixtures, and check foundations 
for remodeling. 


337 Detroit 


67.00 


20.00 


87.00 


2581 


Libby 




50.00 


50.00 




512 Ann Arbor 




40.00 


40.00 


2685 


Missoula 


10.00 


30.00 


40.00 


HYDROLEVEtf 


574 Mt. Clemens 


10.00 


20.00 


30.00 


2719 


Thompson Fall 


20.00 


20.00 




871 Battle Creek 




40.00 


40.00 


2812 


Missoula 




10.00 


10.00 


... the old reliable water 


898 St. Joseph 




40.00 


40.00 


3038 


Bonner 




40.00 


40.00 


level with modern features. Toolbox size. 
Durable 7" container with exclusive reser- 


982 Detroit 




40.00 


40.00 




Kl 


TDDJICVJI 






voir, keeps level filled and ready. 50 ft. 


998 Royal Oak 


80.00 




80.00 




ncannonn 






clear touBh 3/10" tube gives you 100 ft. of 


1102 Detroit 




40.00 


40.00 


253 


Omaha 


23.00 


115.00 


138.00 


leveling in each set-up, with 
1/32" accuracy and fast one- f 


j^Xr-N 


1161 Bay City M.S. 




20.00 


20.00 


1055 


Lincoln 


64.00 


15.00 


79.00 


man operation — outside, in- 


S^ V 


1191 Lansing 
1301 Monroe 


20.00 
138.00 


20.00 
40.00 


20.00 
178.00 


1463 
1606 


Omaha 
Omaha 




15,00 
160.00 


15.00 
160.00 


side, around corners, over 
obstructions. Anywhere you 
can climb or crawl! 


£% 


1373 Flint 


88.00 


60.00 


148.00 


1881 


Fremont 


3.00 


20.00 


23.00 


Why waste money on delicate ^ 


1433 Detroit 


26.00 


60.00 


86.00 


2359 


Omaha 




15.00 


15.00 


instruments, or lose time and ac- ^^^^ 


1449 Lansing 


16.00 


40.00 


56.00 






NEVADA 






curacy on makeshift leveling? Since 1950^^ 
thousands of carpenteis, builders, inside trades, 


1452 Detroit 


83.00 


80.00 


163.00 


971 


Reno 




30.00 


30.00 


etc. have found that HYDROLEVEL pays for 


1461 Traverse City 


9.00 


40.00 


49.00 


1780 


Las Vegas 


42.00 


20.00 


62.00 


itself quickly. 


1513 Detroit 




20.00 


20.00 












Send check or money order for $14.95 and 


1615 Grand Rapids 


11.00 




11.00 




NEW 


HAMPSHIRE 




your name and address. We will rush you a 
Ilydrolevel by return mail postpaid. Or — buy 


1654 Midland 


5.00 




5.00 


625 


Manchester 


40.00 




40.00 


three Hydrolevcls at :?9.95 each, postpaid. Sell 


2026 Coldwater 


20.00 


60.00 


80.00 


921 


Portsmouth 


92.00 




92.00 


two for $14.95 each and have yours free! No 
C.O.D. Satisfaction guaranteed or money back. 


2252 Grand Rapids 




40.00 


40.00 


1031 


Dover 


4.00 


20.00 


24.00 


2585 Saginaw 


14.00 


40.00 


54.00 


1247 


Laconia 


10.00 




10.00 


FIRST IN WATER LEVEL DEStGhJ SINCE 1950 


2703 Grand Rapids 


10.00 


10.00 


20.00 


2276 


Berlin 


20.00 




20.00 


DESOTO TOOL COMPANY 


2776 Kalamazoo 




20.00 


20.00 




NEW JERSEY 






P.O. Box G Ocean Springs, Miss. 39564 


MINNESOTA 






15 


Hackensack 


228.00 


45.00 


273.00 


V J 


7 Minneapolis 
87 St. Paul 


55.00 
47.35 




55.00 
47.35 


23 
31 


Dover 
Trenton 


95.00 
290.00 


15.00 


110.00 
290.00 






307 Winona 


3.00 




3.00 


65 


Perth Amboy 




10,00 


10.00 


Be Betfer Informed! 


548 Minneapolis 


11.00 




11.00 


118 


Jersey City 


20.00 




20.00 




606 Va. Eveleth 
614 Alexandria 


100.00 
14.00 




100.00 
14.00 


119 
121 


Newark 
Vineland 


30.00 
101.00 




30.00 
101.00 


Work Better! Earn More! 


649 Crookston 


10.00 




10.00 


139 Jersey City 


12.00 




12.00 


ORDER YOUR COPY 


766 Albert Lea 


35.00 
12.00 




35.00 
12.00 


155 
299 


Plainfield 
Union City 


5.00 
45.00 


10,00 


15.00 
45.00 


_* 


851 Anoka 






1429 Little Falls 


15.00 




15.00 


325 


Paterson 


74.00 




74.00 


SIGMON'S 


1644 Minneapolis 


78.00 




78.00 


349 


Orange 


20.00 


10,00 


30.00 




MISSISSIPPI 

387 Columbus 34.00 
1471 Jackson 60.00 
1518 Gulfport 10.00 




34.00 
60.00 
10.00 


383 
391 
393 
399 
432 
455 


Bayonne 

Hoboken 

Camden 

Phillipsburg 

Atlantic City 

Somerville 


20.00 

17.00 
375.70' 

50.00 
105.00 

35.35= 


20.00 

25.00 
30.00 


20.00 

17.00 
395,70 

50.00 
130.00 

65.35 


A FRAMING GUIDE 
and STEEL SQUARE" 


MISSOURI 






^^ • 312 Pages 


47 St. Louis 
61 Kansas City 


94.00 
290.00 


45.00 


94.00 
335.00 


486 
490 


Bayonne 
Passaic 


40.00 
60.00 


10.00 
40.00 


50.00 
100.00 


^^*^^j 


9 i^f OUD|eCTS 

Completely In- 
dexed 


73 St. Louis 


40.00 




40.00 


542 


Salem 


40.00 




40.00 


<^^^^ ,-<^i 


• Handy Pocket 


110 St. Joseph 


42.00 




42.00 


564 


Jersey City 




10.00 


10.00 


^■^""^ ' 


Size 


185 St. Louis 


13.00 




13.00 


612 


Union Hill 


16.00 




16,00 


''^ .,4'^:'' ■ 


• Hard Leatherette 
Cover 

9 Useful Every 
Minute 


417 St. Louis 


50.00 




50.00 


620 


Madison 


306.00 


95.00 


401.00 


■ :r%^':' " 


602 St. Louis 


40.00 




40.00 


715 


Elizabeth 


145.00 


10.00 


155.00 


" ■ ■■ '" - ^ 


618 Sikeston 


15.00 




15.00 


781 


Princeton 


40.00 


10.00 


50.00 


>'■-'■.'"'■-■ 




945 Jefferson City 


13.00 




13.00 


821 


Newark 


74.00 




74.00 


^^^^■^^^^^K^^^^H uoiu nunc oi imuL'r.sianu- 


978 Springfield 


70.00 




70.00 


842 


Pleasantville 


20.00 


35.00 


55.00 


H^^^^^^^^^^^H 


1329 Independence 




10.00 


10.00 


1006 


New Brunswic 


k 120.00 




120.00 




1596 St Louis 


70.00 




70.00 


1107 


N. Plainfield 


240.54* 




240.54 


W^^^^^^^^^^^ to 


1635 Kansas City 


13.00 


20.00 


33.00 


1209 


Newark 




20.00 


20.00 


^^^^^^^^^^ Dozens tables 
^^^^^^^^ mortar. 


1739 Kirkwood 


50.00 




50.00 


1489 


Burlington 


2,452.92' 


55.00 


2,507.92 


^^^^^ brick, concrete, cement, 


1795 Farmington 


5.00 




5.00 


1493 


Pompton Lakes 15.00 




15.00 


^^^ rafters, stairs, nails, sled 
beams, tile, many others. Use of steel square, square 


1839 Washington 


21.00 




21.00 


1613 


Newark 


39.00 


10.00 


49.00 


root tables, solitls, whidows. frames. Every biiilrtins 


1925 Columbia 


21.00 




21.00 


1743 


Wildwood 


35.00 




35.00 


I'uniiniii./tii. ;iii(.l \y.u\. 


1987 St. Charles 


24.00 




24.00 


2018 


Lakewood 


185.00 


35.00 


220.00 


SATISFACTION GUARANTEED OR MONEY 
REFUNDED 


2030 St. Genevieve 


19.50 




19.50 


2098 


Camden 


15.00 




15.00 


ORDER <f i| nn Postpaid, or COD, you 
TODAY ;p**.*'*' pay charges. 


2057 Kirksville 


10.00 


5.00 


15.00 


2212 


Newark 


37.94= 


30.00 


67.94 


2119 SL Louis 
2214 Festus 


50.00 
6.00 




50.00 
6.00 


2250 
2315 


Red Bank 
Jersey City 


334.45= 
20.00 


40.00 


374.45 
20.00 


CLINE-SIGMON, Publishers 

Department 473 
P. O. Box 367 Hickory, N. C. 28601 


APRIL, 1973 














33 











m 


m 


i 




"While in train- 
ins i earned 
S200 ... now 
have 3 mobile 
unit ... it was 
best instruction 
one can get." 
Orville Pierce 
LaPuente. Calif. 




You'll EARN MORE, LIVE BETTER 
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an evergrowing field offering big pay 
jobs, big profits as your own boss. What 
more could you ask! 

Train at Home - Earn Extra $$$$ Right Away! 
All this can be yours FAST regardless 
of age. education, minor physical handi- 
caps. Job enjoyment and earnings begin 
AT ONCE as you quickly, easily learn 
to CASH IN on all kinds of locksmithing 
jobs. All keys, locks, parts, picks, special 
tools and equipment come with the 
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experts guide you to success. 

Illustrated Book, Sample Lesson Pages FREE 
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earning, enjoying life more everywhere. 
You, can, too. Coupon brings exciting 
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Member, Natl. Home Study Council. 
Approved for Veterans Training. 
LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE 

Div. Technical Home Study Schools 
Dept.ii]S-fi4:^Little Falls, N. J. 07424 



LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE. Dept. 1118-043 

Div. Technical Home Study Schools 

Little Falls. New Jersey 07424 Est. 1948 

Please send FREE illustrated Book — "Your Big Oppor- 
tunities in Locksmithing." complete Equipment folder 
and sample lesson pages — FREE of all obligation — 
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Name.., 



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^— . D Check here if Eligible for Veteran Training _.J 

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IB f oTone 




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JNAME 

I ADDRESS, 
I CITY ^ 



_AGE_ 



_STATE_ 



_ZIP_ 





Local 


Con- 








Local 


Con- 






Union 


vention 








Union 


vention 






Contri- 


Contri- 








Contri- 


Contri- 




Local City & State 


butions 


butions 


Total 


Local City & State 


butions 


butions 


Total 


NEW MEXICO 






1015 


Saratoga 


20.00 




20.00 


1245 Carlsbad 


21.00 




21.00 


1042 


Plattsburgh 


90.00 




90.00 


1319 Albuquerque 


495.00 


20.00 


515.00 


1075 


Hudson 


16.00 




16.00 


1962 Las Cruces 


25.00 




25.00 


1093 


Glencove 


20.00 


15.00 


35.00 










1134 


Mt. Kisco 


80.00 


15.00 


95.00 


NFW vnRK 






1135 


Port Jefferson 


82.00 


15.00 


97.00 




" 






1151 


Batavia 




15.00 


15.00 


6 Amsterdam 


40.00 


15.00 


55.00 


1162 


College Point LI. 40.00 


35.00 


75.00 


9 Buffalo 


20.00 


20.00 


40.00 


1164 


New York 


100.00 


20.00 


120.00 


12 Syracuse 


220.00 




220.00 


1167 


Smithtown 


60.00 


30.00 


90.00 


22 New York 


200.00 


25.00 


225.00 


1175 


Kingston 


20.00 


20.00 


40.00 


53 White Plains 


110.00 


50.00 


160.00 


1204 


New York 


60.00 


35.00 


95.00 


66 Jamestown 




15.00 


15.00 


1292 


Huntington 


80.00 


15.00 


95.00 


72 Rochester 




75.00 


75.00 


1318 


Farmingdale 


16.00 




16.00 


77 Port Chester 


8.00 


15.00 


23.00 


1345 


Buffalo 


40.00 




40.00 


78 Troy 


10.00 


15.00 


25.00 


1377 


Buffalo 


20.00 




20.00 


99 Cohoes 


15.00 




15.00 


1397 


North 








117 Albany 


742.00 


25.00 


767.00 




Hempstead 


314.00 


25.00 


339.00 


125 Utica 


120.00 


30.00 


150.00 


1446 


Albany 




5.00 


5.00 


135 New York 


309.00 


55.00 


364.00 


1456 


New York 




95.00 


95.00 


146 Schenectady 


73.00 


30.00 


103.00 


1483 


Patchoque 


49.00 


10.00 


59.00 


163 Peekskill 


80.00 


25.00 


105.00 


1508 


Lyons 


13.00 




13.00 


187 Geneva 


1,125.00 




1,125.00 


1511 


Southhampton 


24.00 




24.00 


188 Yonkers 


12.00 


10.00 


22.00 


1536 


New York 


188.00 


40.00 


228.00 


203 Poughkeepsie 


40.00 




40.00 


1575 


Endicott 


2.00 




2.00 


229 Glens Falls 


40.00 


30.00 


70.00 


1577 


Buffalo 


40.00 


20.00 


60.00 


231 Rochester 


20.00 




20.00 


1600 


Cannonsville 




25.00 


25.00 


246 New York 


1,000.00 


45.00 


1,045.00 


1649 


Woodhaven 


110.00 




110.00 


251 Kingston 


20.00 


10.00 


30.00 


1656 


Oneonta 




30.00 


30.00 


257 New York 


600.00 


45.00 


645.00 


1657 


New York 


13.00 




13.00 


278 Watertown 


19.00 


35.00 


54.00 


1681 


Hornell 




15.00 


15.00 


281 Binghamton 




10.00 


10.00 


1701 


Buffalo 


20.00 




20.00 


284 New York 


100.00 


10.00 


110.00 


1704 


Carmel 


8.00 




8.00 


289 Lockport 


32.00 


10.00 


42.00 


1757 


Buffalo 


17.00 


10.00 


27.00 


298 New York 


208.00 


15.00 


223.00 


1772 


Hicksville 


42.00 


10.00 


52.00 


301 Newburgh 


85.00 


45.00 


130.00 


1837 


Babylon 


41.00 


15.00 


56.00 


322 Niagara Falls 


63.00 


15.00 


78.00 


1888 


New York 


200.00 




200.00 


323 Beacon 


80.00 




80.00 


1973 


Riverhead 


20.00 




20.00 


350 New Rochelle 


40.00 


15.00 


55.00 


1978 


Buffalo 


20.00 




20.00 


353 New York 


75.00 


15.00 


90.00 


2031 


Brooklyn 


20.00 




20.00 


355 Buffalo 


29.00 




29.00 


2100 Amitvville 


20.00 




20.00 


357 Islip 


80.00 


20.00 


100.00 


2117 


Flushing 




15.00 


15.00 


366 New York 


36.00 




36.00 


2155 


New York 




15.00 


15.00 


369 North 








2161 


Catskill 


118.00 


15.00 


133.00 


Tonawanda 


20.00 




20.00 


2163 


New York 


41.00 


20.00 


61.00 


374 New York 


42.00 




42.00 


2236 


New York 


40.00 


15.00 


55.00 


412 Sayville 


60.00 




60.00 


2241 


Brooklyn 


80.00 




80.00 


440 Buffalo 


21.00 




21.00 


2287 


New York 


60.00 


30.00 


90.00 


447 Ossining 


60.00 




60.00 


2305 


New York 


20.00 


15.00 


35.00 


453 Auburn 


40.00 


20.00 


60.00 


2440 


Montrose 


10.00 




10.00 


488 New York 


150.00 




150.00 


2632 


New York 




45.00 


45.00 


493 Mt. Vernon 


10.00 


10.00 


20.00 


2669 


W. Islip L.I. 


9.00 


15.00 


24.00 


502 Canandaigna 


60.00 




60.00 


2765 


Nassau County 


20.00 


15.00 


35.00 


503 Lancaster 


20.00 


10.00 


30.00 


2947 


New York 




15.00 


15.00 


516 Lindenhurst 


20.00 




20.00 


3128 


New York 




15.00 


15.00 


543 Mamaroneck 


70.00 




70.00 


3211 


Herkimer 


40.00 




40.00 


574 Middletown 


70.00 


30.00 


100.00 












603 Ithaca 


57.00 


30.00 


87.00 




NORTH CAROLINA 




608 New York 


75.00 


55.00 


130.00 


522 


Durham 


20.00 




20.00 


662 Mt. Morris 


43.00 


40.00 


83.00 


1165 


Wilmington 


20.00 




20.00 


689 Dunkirk 




15.00 


15.00 


2230 


Greensboro 


60.00 




60.00 


700 Corning 


11.00 




11.00 












729 Liberty 


23.00 


15.00 


38.00 




NORTH DAKOTA 




740 New York 


20.00 




20.00 


1032 


Minot 


20.00 




20.00 


747 Oswego 


40.00 




40.00 












754 Fulton 




15.00 


15.00 






OHIO 






787 New York 




30.00 


30.00 


11 


Cleveland 




15.00 


15.00 


791 New York 


33.00 


30.00 


63.00 


29 


Cincinnati 


120.00 


60.00 


180.00 


808 New York 


60.00 




60.00 


39 Cleveland 




30.00 


30.00 


950 New York 


60.00 




60.00 


69 


Canton 




150.00 


150.00 


956 New York 


10.00 




10.00 


104 


Dayton 


20.00 


30.00 


50.00 


964 Rockland 


81.00 


30.00 


111.00 


105 


Cleveland 


108.00 


65.00 


173.00 



34 



THE CARPENTER 





Local 


Con- 






Local 


Con- 








Local 


Con- 






Union 


vention 






Union 


vention 








Union 


vention 






Contri- 


Contri- 






Contri- 


Contri- 








Contri- 


Contri- 




Local City & State 


butions 


butions 


Total 


Local City & State 


bution 


bution 


Total 


Local 


City & State 


butions 


butions 


Total 


136 Newark 




15.00 


15.00 


1060 Norman 


37.00 




37.00 


124 


Bradford 


20.00 




20.00 


171 Youngstown 


35.00 


20.00 


55.00 


1072 Muskogee 




1.00 


1.00 


129 


Hazleton 


29.00 




29.00 


182 Cleveland 


48.00 


75.00 


123.00 


1585 Lawton 




1.00 


1.00 


142 


Pittsburgh 




45.00 


45.00 


186 Steubenvllle 




15.00 


15.00 


1659 Bartlesville 


21.00 




21.00 


191 


York 2,095.41=' 




2,095.41 


200 Columbus 


224.80 


86.00 


310.80 










211 


Pittsburgh 




15.00 


15.00 


224 Cincinnati 




60.00 


60.00 


OREGON 






230 


Pittsburgh 


37.00 


15.00 


52.00 


245 Cambridge 




15.00 


15.00 


190 Klamath Falls 


30.00 




30.00 


239 


Easton 




15.00 


15.00 


248 Toledo 


35.00 


30.00 


65.00 


226 Portland 




215.00 


215.00 


261 


Scranton 


116.00 


45.00 


161.00 


254 Cleveland 


10.00 


30.00 


40.00 


573 Baker 




25.00 


25.00 


287 


Harrisburg 1,409.00 


50.00 


1,459.00 


356 Marietta 




15.00 


15.00 


583 Portland 




60.00 


60.00 


288 


Homestead 


20.00 




20.00 


372 Lima 


195.00 


90.00 


285.00 


738 Portland 




40.00 


40.00 


321 


Connellsville 


73.50 




73.50 


404 Lake County 


40.00 


125.00 


165.00 


780 Astoria 


20.00 


30.00 


50.00 


330 


New Kensington 


40.00 




40.00 


415 Cincinnati 


30.00 


77.00 


107.00 


1001 North Bend 




10.00 


10.00 


333 


New Kensington 




15.00 


15.00 


437 Portsmouth 


20.00 


75.00 


95.00 


1017 Redmond 




20.00 


20.00 


359 


Philadelphia 




60.00 


60.00 


525 Coshocton 


20.00 




20.00 


1020 Portland 


40.00 


135.00 


175.00 


368 


Allentown 


33.00 


15.00 


48.00 


639 Akron 


37.00 


155.00 


192.00 


1065 Salem 




45.00 


45.00 


401 


Pittston 


40.00 




40.00 


650 Pomeroy 


413.00 


15.00 


428.00 


1094 Albany Corvallis 20.00 


55.00 


75.00 


406 


Bethlehem 


29.00 




29.00 


660 Springfield 




10.00 


10.00 


1120 Portland 


270.00 


55.00 


325.00 


414 


Nanticoke 


10.00 




10.00 


703 Lockland 




30.00 


30.00 


1157 Lebanon 


31.00 


40.00 


71.00 


422 


New Brighton 


37.00 


15.00 


52.00 


705 Lorain 


5.00 


30,00 


35.00 


1273 Eugene 




60.00 


60.00 


430 


Wilkensburg 




30.00 


30.00 


716 Zanesville 


40.00 


35.00 


75.00 


1277 Bend 


5.00 


10.00 


15.00 


454 


Philadelphia 


527.00 


30.00 


557.00 


735 Mansfield 




30.00 


30.00 


1388 Oregon City 


43.00 


40.00 


83.00 


462 


Greensburg 


20.00 


15.00 


35.00 


739 College Hill 




15.00 


15.00 


1411 Salem 




25.00 


25.00 


465 


Ardmore 


20.00 


15.00 


35.00 


854 Madisonville 


40.00 




40.00 


1502 Seaside 




10.00 


10.00 


492 


Reading 


29.00 


30.00 


59.00 


868 Cincinnati 




15.00 


15.00 


1746 Portland 


2.00 


10.00 


12.00 


500 


Butler 


32.00 




32.00 


873 Cincinnati 




30.00 


30.00 


1857 Portland 


51.00 


30.00 


81.00 


501 


Stroudsburg 


68.00 




68.00 


892 Youngstown 


3.00 


15.00 


18.00 


1896 The Dalles 




60.00 


60.00 


514 


Wilkes-Barre 


80.00 


15.00 


95.00 


940 Sandusky 


10.00 


25.00 


35.00 


2066 St. Helens Vic. 


19.00 


35.00 


54.00 


541 


Washington 


11.00 




11.00 


976 Marion 


20.00 




20.00 


2067 Medford 




50.00 


50.00 


556 


Meadville 


19.00 


15.00 


34.00 


1079 Steubenville 




30.00 


30.00 


2130 Hillsboro 




20.(K) 


20.00 


677 


Lebanon 


20.00 




20.00 


1108 Cleveland 


15.00 


15.00 


30.00 


2195 Gardiner 




20.00 


20.00 


691 


Williamsport 


30.00 




30.00 


1111 Ironton 


5.00 




5.00 


2275 McMinnville 




10.00 


10.00 


709 


Shenandoah 


8.00 




8.00 


1138 Toledo 




30.00 


30.00 


2416 Portland 


4.00 


25.00 


29.00 


768 


Kingston 


60.00 




60.00 


1180 Cleveland 


5.00 


30.00 


35.00 


2521 Triangle Lake 




10.00 


10.00 


833 


Berwyn 


20.00 


10.00 


30.00 


1189 Columbiana Co. 


22.00 


30.00 


52.00 


2522 St. Helens 




20.00 


20.00 


838 


Sunbury 


105.00 


15.00 


120.00 


1242 Akron 




75.00 


75.00 


2524 St. Helens 




10.00 


10.00 


843 


Jenkintown 


11.00 




11.00 


1255 Chillicothe 




15.00 


15.00 


2530 Gilchrist 




20.00 


20.00 


845 


Clifton 


21.00 


45.00 


66.00 


1311 Dayton 




30.00 


30.00 


2554 Lebanon 




50.00 


50.00 


900 Altoona 


10.00 


50.00 


60.00 


1359 Toledo 


20.00 


30.00 


50.00 


2573 Coos Bay 




10.00 


10.00 


972 


Philadelphia 


20.00 


30.00 


50.00 


1365 Cleveland 




120.00 


120.00 


2588 Bates 




10.00 


10.00 


1000 


Greenville 


20.00 


30.00 


50.00 


1393 Toledo 




45.00 


45.00 


2627 Cottage Grove 




10.00 


10.00 


1044 


Charleroi 


23.00 


15.00 


38.00 


1426 Elyria 


40.00 


60.00 


100.00 


2636 Valsetz 




20.00 


20.00 


1050 


Philadelphia 


536.00 


45.00 


581.00 


1438 Warren 




130.00 


130.00 


2691 Coquille 


24.00 


30.00 


54.00 


1073 


Philadelphia 




45.00 


45.00 


1454 Cincinnati 


340.00 




340.00 


2698 Bandon 




20.00 


20.00 


1160 


Pittsburgh 


10.00 


30.00 


40.00 


1477 Middletown 




15.00 


15.00 


2701 Lakeview 


29.00 




29.00 


1320 


Somerset 


8.00 




8.00 


1499 Kent 




25.00 


25.00 


2714 Dallas 


40.00 


20.00 


60.00 


1333 


State College 


153.00 


15.00 


168.00 


1519 Ironton 




15.00 


15.00 


2750 Springfield 




30.00 


30.00 


1419 


Johnstown 




15.00 


15.00 


1602 Cincinnati 


13.00 


60.00 


73.00 


2756 Goshen 




15.00 


15.00 


1462 


Bristol 




30.00 


30.00 


1629 Ashtabula 


2.00 


15.00 


17.00 


2769 Wheeler 




10.00 


10.00 


1562 


North Wales 


1.00 




1.00 


1720 Athens 


6.00 




6.00 


2784 Coquille 


10.00 


30.00 


40.00 


1595 


Conshohocken 


10.00 


30.00 


40.00 


1750 Cleveland 


14.00 


105.00 


119.00 


2787 Springfield 




20.00 


20.00 


1732 


Ambridge 


15.00 




15.00 


1825 Bowling Green 




15.00 


15.00 


2822 St. Helens 




20.00 


20.00 


1759 


Pittsburgh 


61.00 


15.00 


76.00 


1871 Cleveland 
1929 Cleveland 




90.00 
90.00 


90.00 
90.00 


2851 La Grande 
2881 Portland 




30.00 
10.00 


30.00 
10.00 


1856 


Philadelphia 


40.00 


60.00 


100.00 


1935 Barberton 


38.00 


30.00 


68.00 


2896 Lyons 




10.00 


10.00 


1906 


Philadelphia 


399.00 


60.00 


459.00 


2077 Columbus 




30.00 


30.00 


2902 Burns 




40.00 


40.00 


2235 


Pittsburgh 




35.00 


35.00 


2159 Cleveland 




60.00 


60.00 


2916 Kinzua 




10.00 


10.00 


2264 


Pittsburgh 


80.00 


15.00 


95.00 


2180 Defiance 




15.00 


15.00 


2924 John Day 




20.00 


20.00 


2274 


Pittsburgh 


200.00 




200.00 


2239 Port Clinton 




30.00 


30.00 


2942 Albany 


18.00 


50.00 


68.00 


2850 


Philadelphia 




45.00 


45.00 


2248 Piqua 




15.00 


15.00 


2949 Roseburg 


18.00 


30.00 


48.00 












2280 Mt. Vernon 


10.00 




10.00 


2961 St. Helens 




20.00 


20.00 




RHODE ISLAND 




2338 Wadsworth 




30.00 


30.00 


2970 Pilot Rocks 




40.00 


40.00 


94 


Providence 


40.00 




40.00 


2408 Xenia 




45.00 


45.00 


3009 Grants Pass 




30.00 


30.00 


176 


Newport 


50.00 




50.00 


2641 Barberton 




60.00 


60.00 


3035 Springfield 




30.00 


30.00 


801 


Woonsocket 


60.00 




60.00 


2783 Columbus 




20.00 


20.00 


3064 Toledo 




30.00 


30.00 




















3091 Vaughn 




30.00 


30.00 




SOUTH 


CAROLINA 




OKLAHOMA 














159 


Charleston 




10.00 


10.00 


329 Oklahoma City 


60.00 


11.00 


71.00 


PENNSYLVANIA 




1798 


Greenville 


36.00 




36.00 


763 Enid 


20.00 




20.00 


8 Philadelphia 




10.00 


10.00 












943 Tulsa 


222.00 




222.00 


59 Lancaster 




5.00 


5.00 




SOUTH DAKOTA 




986 McAlester 


17.00 




17.00 


122 Philadelphia 




45.00 


45.00 


78- 


! Sioux Falls 


10.00 




10.00 



APRIL, 1973 



35 



Local City&Staie 



50 Knoxville 
74 Chattanooga 
259 Jackson 
345 Memphis 
1608 S. Pittsburg 
1818 Clarl(sville 
2473 Bristol 
2825 Nashville 



14 San Antonio 

198 Dallas 

213 Houston 

379 Texarkana 

411 San Angelo 

425 El Paso 

526 Galveston 

665 Amarillo 

753 Beaumont 

1084 Angleton 

1104 Tyler 

1266 Austin 

1565 Abilene 

1634 Big Spring 

1822 Fort Worth 

1884 Lubbock 

1971 Temple 

2007 Orange 

2190 Harlingen 



Local 
Union 
Contri- 
butions 

TENNESSEE 

250.00 
40.00 
22.00 
28.00 
10.00 
40.00 
40.00 
6.00 

TEXAS 

103.00 
111.00 
30.00 
20.00 
15.00 
20.00 
20.00 
28.00 
20.00 
8.00 
20.00 

20.00 

5.00 

41.00 

13.00 

188.00 

42.00 



Con- 
vention 
Contri- 
butions Total 



Local City & State 



Local 
Union 
Contri- 
butions 



Con- 
vention 
Contri- 
butions Total 



27.00 



10.00 



1.00 



5.00 



250.00 
40.00 
22.00 
55.00 
10.00 
40.00 
40.00 
6.00 



103.00 
111.00 
30.00 
30.00 
15.00 
20.00 
20.00 
28.00 
20.00 

8.00 
20.00 

1.00 
20.00 

5.00 

41.00 

13.00 

188.00 

5.00 
42.00 



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_State_ 



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UTAH 

450 Ogden 5.00 

722 Salt Lake City 20.00 

1498 Provo 25.00 



10.00 



VIRGINIA 



303 

319 

331 

388 

396 

1534 

1665 

2070 

1078 

2033 



Portsmouth 

Roanoke 

Norfolk 

Richmond 

Newport News 

Petersburg 

Alexandria 

Roanoke 

Fredericksburg 

Front Royal 



37.00 
35.00 
20.00 
43.00 

100.00 
20.00 

263.95* 
13.00 

101.71* 

131.84* 



590 Rutland 



VERMONT 

7.00 

WASHINGTON 



98 Spokane 

131 Seattle 

317 Aberdeen 

338 Seattle 

470 Tacoma 

562 Everett 

756 Bellingham 

770 Yakima 

870 Spokane 

1036 Longview 

1054 Everett 

1136 Ketle Falls 

1148 Olympia 

1184 Seattle 

1195 Seattle 

1238 Woodland 

1289 Seattle 

1332 Grand Coule 

1532 Anacortes 

1597 Bremerton 

1689 Tacoma 

1708 Auburn 

1715 Vancouver 

1797 Renton 

1845 Snoqualmie Fall 

1849 Pasco 

1974 Ellinsburg 

1982 Seattle 

2127 Centralia 

2205 Wenatche 

2317 Bremerton 

2382 Spokane 

2396 Seattle 

2403 Richland 

2498 Longview 

2519 Seattle 

2536 Port Gamble 

2628 Centralia 

2633 Tacoma 

2637 Sedro Wolley 

2655 Everett 

2659 Everett 

2667 Bellingham 

2739 Yakima 

2767 Morton 
2805 Klickitat 

2841 Peshastin 
2894 Twisp 
2935 Creston 



85.00 
189.50 
20.00 
75.95 
58.62 
10.00 
10.00 
370.00 
20.00 
10.00 



20.00 
5.00 
5.00 

82.00 
25.00 

4.00 
24.00 

6.00 

136.00 



6.00 



32.00 

8.00 

20.00 

40.00 

100.00 
34.00 
20.00 

2.00 



80.00 
75.00 

85.00 
65.00 
55.00 

25.00 
35.00 

20.00 
20.00 
10.00 



20.00 
77.00 
25.00 

45.00 
20.00 
30.00 
25.00 
10.00 
40.00 
60.00 
10.00 
30.00 
50.00 
20.00 
20.00 
15.00 
35.00 
10.00 
20.00 
30.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
20.00 
20.00 
10.00 
20.00 
50.00 
60.00 
20.00 
10.00 
20.00 



5.00 
20.00 
35.00 



37.00 
35.00 
20.00 
43.00 

100.00 
20.00 

263.95 
13.00 

101.71 

131.84 



7.00 



165.00 

264.50 
20.00 

160.95 

123.62 
65.00 
10.00 

395.00 
55.00 
10.00 
20.00 
20.00 
30.00 
5.00 
5.00 
20.00 

159.00 
50.00 
4.00 
69.00 
26.00 
30.00 

161.00 
10.00 
40.00 
60.00 
16.00 
30.00 
50.00 
52.00 
28.00 
35.00 
75.00 
10.00 

120.00 
64.00 
30.00 
10.00 
12.00 
10.00 
20.00 
20.00 
10.00 
20.00 
50.00 
60.00 
20.00 
10.00 
20.00 



Local Unions That Received 


CLIC Plaques In 1972 


LOCAL UNION CITY & 


NO. 


STATE 


16 


Springfield, Illinois 


25 


Los Angeles, California 


58 


Chicago, Illinois 


80 


Chicago, Illinois 


116 


Essexville, Michigan 


191 


York, Pennsylvania 


287 


Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 


396 


Newport News, Virginia 


620 


Morristown, New Jersey 


770 


Yakima, Washington 


838 


Shamokin, Pennsylvania 


839 


Des Plaines, Illinois 


857 


Tucson, Arizona 


1489 


Burlington, New Jersey 


1564 


Casper, Wyoming 



Local City & State 

3023 Omak 
3099 Aberdeen 
3119 Tacoma 
3121 Seattle 
3185 Creosote 



Local 
Union 
Contri- 
butions 

20.00 



Con- 
vention 
Contri- 
butions Total 



40.00 
10.00 
10.00 
20.00 
10.00 



WEST VIRGINIA 

3 Wheeling 23.00 

128 St. Albans 10.00 

428 Fairmont 31.00 

1159 Point Pleasant 45.00 

2427 Charleston 13.00 



WISCONSIN 



91 

161 

252 

264 

290 

630 

755 

820 

849 

755 

1074 

1143 

1208 

1582 

1709 

1733 

1741 

1919 

2073 

2246 

2334 

3187 



Racine 

Kenosha 

Oshkosh 

Milwaukee 

Lake Geneva 

Neenah 

Superior 

Wisconsin Rapids 

Manitowoc 

Appleton 

Eau Claire 

La Crosse 

Milwaukee 

Milwaukee 

Ashland 

Marhfield 

Milwaukee 

Stevens Point 

Milwaukee 

Fennimore 

Baraboo 

Watertown 



13.00 
15.00 

2.00 
48.00 
11.00 
11.00 
30.00 
10.00 
20.00 
10.00 
29.00 

5.00 
10.00 
15.00 
10.00 

1.00 
35.00 

4.00 

5.00 
12.00 
11.00 

9.00 



469 Cheyenne 
659 Rawlins 
1432 Laramie 
1564 Casper 



WYOMING 

29.00 

20.00 

15.00 

400.00 



40.00 
30.00 
10.00 
20.00 
10.00 



23.00 
10.00 
31.00 
45.00 
13.00 



13.00 
15.00 

2.00 
48.00 
11.00 
11.00 
30.00 
20.00 
20.00 
10.00 
29.00 

5.00 
10.00 
15.00 
10.00 

1.00 
35.00 

4.00 

5.00 
12.00 
11.00 

9.00 



29.00 

20.00 

15.00 

400.00 



"^ Indicates that local's contribution includes 
the 1% payroll deduction of the full time 
officers and business represetatives. 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



BUFFALO BUBBLE 

Continued from page 4 

Crete poured, no matter what tlie 
temperature and weather condition 
outside. 

Bubble Dimensions 

The vinyl bubble is 136' 8" wide 
X 334' long and 40' high when com- 
pleted. The ends are formed at a 76' 
radius. The outside dimensions were 
formed by erecting an aluminum 
structural member similar to a ship 
channel. This structural framework 
at both ends was at a 6-foot level 
and this dropped to a 16-inch eleva- 
tion at both sides. At one end this 
framework accommodated the fans 
and heaters and an emergency exit 
door. In the other end the automatic 
louvers for ventilation and another 
emergency door were located. These 
sections of channel are 14 feet in 
length and bolted together with an 
inside splice plate and Vi -inch boUs. 
The framework is held in position 
by 10,000 lbs. screw type ground 
anchors and V^" turnbuckles at 
4' 8" centers. 

The bubble was inflated with a 
minimum of air to make it easier 
to handle while erecting. While in- 
flation was taking place, each anchor 
cable between the iimer and outer 
layer of vinyl was temporarily con- 
nected to a trolley that runs in a 
track similar to a inverted sliding 
door track. This track is bolted to 
the structual channel which forms 
the outside perimeter of the bubble. 

When the bubble is inflated, these 
anchor cables are transferred to the 
corresponding ground anchor. 

When this was completed, the 
outer seal was made by using a small 
"U" clip that holds the outer vinyl 
to the outside edge of the aluminum 
channel. This procedure is dupli- 
cated on the inside for the inner 
layer of vinyl. 

Two-Hour Blowup 

At 9:30 a.m. inflation of the 
bubble was started, and it was com- 
pleted by 11:30 a.m. Anchor cables 
were transferred to the ground 
anchors and the outer seal com- 
pleted by 4:30, the same afternoon. 
The following day the inner seal was 
formed and the air lock for truck 
passage was slid into place. ■ 



APPRENTICESHIP CONTESTS 

CALENDAR, MARCH, 1973 

We are pleased to have received noti- 
iication from the following states and 
provinces of their intent to participate in 
the 1973 International Carpenters Ap- 
prenticeship Contest. This is, of course, 
only a partial listing and is subject to 
change. This calendar will appear in The 
Carpenter each month, showing addi- 
tional states and provinces and also 
changes or additions in the categories in 
which contestants will be entered. 







Mill 




State Carpenter 


Cabinet 


Millwr 


Alabama 


X 






(April 27-28) 








Alaska 


X 






Arizona 


X 




X 


(written lest, 


April 9 


16; man 


pulative 


May 26) 








Arkansas 


X 






California 


X 


X 


X 


(June 21-22-2 


3) 






Colorado 


X 


X 


X 


Connecticut 


X 






Delaware 


X 






Dist. of Col. 








& Vic. 


X 


X 


X 


Florida 


X 




X 


(May lO-ll-I 


2) 






Idaho 


X 






(May 4-5) 








Illinois 


X 


X 


X 


(May 23-24) 








Indiana 


X 


X 


X 


Iowa 


X 


X 


X 


Kansas 


X 




X 


Louisiana 


X 




X 


Maryland 


X 


X 


X 


Massachusetts 


X 


X 


X 


(May 18-19-2 


0) 






Michigan 


X 




X 


(May 18-19) 








Minnesota 


X 






Missouri 


X 


X 


X 


(May 16-17) 








Nebraska 


X 




X 


Nevada 


X 






New Jersey 


X 


X 


X 


(May 18-19) 








New Mexico 


X 






(April 27, 28) 






New York 


X 


X 


X 


(June 4-5-6) 








Ohio 


X 


X 


X 


(May 16-17) 








Oklahoma 


X 


X 


X 


(June — ) 








Oregon 


X 


X 


X 


Pennsylvania 


X 


X 


X 


Rhode Island 


X 


X 




Tennessee 


X 




X 


(May 4-5) 








Texas 


X 


X 


X 


(April 26-27) 








Utah 


X 






(May 5 & 12 


) 






Virginia 


X 






Washington 


X 


X 


X 


(May 24-25-2 


6) 






West Virginia 


X 




X 


Wisconsin 


X 






Wyoming 


X 






(May 19-20) 








British Col. 


X 


X 




(May 4, 5) 








Manitoba, Winn. 








X 






Ontario 


X 




X 



Total 



42 



19 



26 



ITIULII'UOL yintuTHiii ions ^ 



TEXTURING MACHINES 

WHATEVER THE TEXTURING JOB 
GOLDBLATT HAS THE MACHINE 

IMPROVED PATTERN PISTOL .. .WITH 

COMPRESSOR... CAN BE CARRIED OR 

ROLLED ANYWHERE BY ONE MAN. 

Built to such rigid tolerance you can 
spray anything that w/ill flow by 
gravity with aggregate small enough 
to pass through five orifice opening 
dial. Comes equipped with 1/16" 
and 9/64" air nozzles for wide 
range. Sprays about 
1/2 gallon of 
material a 
minute, 
depending 
on mix. 




Mil Mixes 

Acoustics 

Drywall Mud 

Texture Paints 

Waterproofing 

and more 



PATTERN PUMP 

16 GALLON HOPPER 25' AIR HOSE 
MODIFIED PATTERN PISTOL GUN 

Covers 1,575 

square feet 

without moving 

rig. Applies up to . 

2 gallon of mate- . 

rial every minute 

for complete cover- ^j 

age. Hopper holds 

16 gallons of 

material. 

ON OFF control on gun or 

machine. Applies spray 

materials up to 3 mils 

thicl( in one pass. 




SUPERTEX 

MAKES HEAVY TEXTURING 
A SMOOTH JOB 

Rugged, depend- 
able, easy to 
maneuver. 
Controls 
centrally "**■ 
located. 100 PSI 
oversized com- ' 
pressor delivers 
fine to coarse 
acoustic material 
terior stucco, fireproofing. 



3' lightweight 
pole gun has 
adjustable 4 
tip air stem. 




Write today for more 
information on Goldblatt's 
Texturing Machines and 
your free 1973 Goldblatt Catalog. 



;^\ GOLDBLATT TOOL CO. 

, 521-D OSAGE 

'' I KANSAS CITY, KANSAS 66110 

1 © DIV. OF BUSS INO UUGHtlN INDUSIBIES 



APRIL, 1973 



37 



L.U. NO. 4 
DAVENPORT, IOWA 

Wimberly, Cecil H. 

L.U. NO. 7 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Darsow. Douglas 
Gartland, Patrick 
Haselius, Harry W. 
Hogland, Lorence 
Spanjers, William 

L.U. NO. 15 
HACKENSACK, N.J. 

Harju. John 

L.U. NO. 35 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 

Biasotti, Louis 
Rogers. George 

L.U. NO. 36 
OAKLANT), CALIF. 

Andrews, Walter 
Catone, Richard 
Clark, Clayton F. 
Fincken, Fred C. 
Fisher, Charles S., Sr. 
Goetz, H. E. 
Leabig, Charles H. 
McNeal, Charles A. 
Olson, Reuben 
Pekonen. Charles 
Platzer, Joseph J. 
Taylor, Murphy 
Willis, John P. 

L.U. NO. 40 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Ruggles, C. Victor 
Pearson, Oscar L. 
Soderquist, Nils E. 

L.U. NO. 50 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Collins. E. V. 

L.U. NO. 51 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Cuddy, John F. 
Milgate, Sidney 
Stovold, Henry W. 

L.U. NO. 59 
LANCASTER. PA. 

Fike, Blaine 
Ginevan, Perry 
Richman, Charles 
Robinson, Merritt 

L.U. NO. 61 
KANSAS CITY, KANS. 
Challander, N. 
Cleveland, W. J. 
McCahon, Earl 
Wilson, Karl 

L.U. NO. 67 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Davis, Bertram 
Knell, Ralph 
LeBlanc, William 
MacDonald, Angus 
Nickerson, James R. 

L.U. NO. 79 

NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

Johnson, Eric 
Lynch, William 



McCleary, Veirl 
Marcosano, Frank 
Petersen, Axel 
Steinle, Alfred 

L.U. NO. 88 
ANACONDA, MONT. 

Stav, Oscar 

L.U. NO. 90 
EVANSVILLE, IND. 

Hale, Everett, Sr. 

L.U. NO. 94 
PROVIDENCE, R.L 

England, Albert E 
Kidd, John R. 
Lambresa, Basil 
Peterson, Evald 
Picotte, Hervey 
Sloan, Leo D., Jr. 

L.U. NO. 98 
SPOKANE, WASH 

Boehm, Adam 
Chaplin, O. M. 
Haye, G. O. 
Jenkins, Tillman 
Menane, Frank 
Murphy, James 
Saari, Albert T. 
Stewart. John T. 
Thayer, Marcus 
Vails, George D. 

L.U. NO. 101 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Barter, Douglas 
Fors, Toivo 
Marshall, William E. 
Piper. Millard F. 
Powell, Charles W., Sr. 
Tibbitt, Winfield 
Wanger, Anthony L. 

L.U. NO. 106 

DES MOINES, IOWA 

Wilfon, Frank 

L.U. NO. 107 
WORCESTER, MASS. 

Astukewicz, Peter 

L.U. NO. 117 
ALBANY, N.Y. 

Borovich, Henry 
Henry, Robert A 
Holmquist, Nils G. 
La Chapelle, Richard 
McNeil, John R. 
Quenneville, Valence 
Schermerhom, Ed. R. 

L.U. NO. 132 
WASHINGTON. D.C 

Berry. W. H. 
Cames, Randolph B. 
Hogan. Warren H. 
Long, Leamon W. 
Pennington, Arlin A. 
Smith, William E. 
Steppe, Haynes 

L.U. NO. 142 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Goda, John 
Mathias, Joseph 



L.U. NO. 181 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Brevik, Fred 
Joseph, Frank 
Nelson, Gunnar B. 
Smith, Louis 

L.U. NO. 185 

ST. LOUIS, MISS. 

Declue, Thomas R. 
Glaser, Edward G. 
James, Everet S. 
Koenig, Fred 
Myres, Mike K. 
Nanney. Walter E. 
Oster, Walter 
Pratte, E. W. 
Rupp, Joseph H. 

L.U. NO. 198 
DALLAS, TEX. 

Copeland. James M. 
Earl. Rosville 
Gann, Aubrey 
Holick, Ed 
Holmes, Ned B. 
Kenemore, J. T. 
McGuire, Leslie 
Shaddock, Jack W. 
Upton, W. H. 

L.U. NO. 199 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Freeman, Frank A. 
Gass, Joseph 
Kardasz, Walter 
Koerner, R. A. 
Person, Eric 
Supilowski, Martin, Sr. 
Zaklan, Raymond 

L.U. NO. 203 
POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y. 

Dopple, Edward 
Dunlavey, Edward 
Freer, John 
KaUop, Anthony 

LU. NO. 225 
ATLANTA, GA. 

Allen, W. M. 
Barrett. Raymond A. 
Brock. H. Lacy 
Carter, C. D. 
Dunn, J. W. 
Fuller, George J. 
Johnson, Howard, Jr 
Parnell, P. H. 
Young, J. D. 

L.U. NO. 226 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Alexander, D. K. 
Anderson, A. Leonard 
Logan, Frank 
Sautner, Albert V., Sr. 

L.U. NO. 242 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Alback. Frank 
Cirar, Walter 
Mazur, Al 
Scheff, Joseph 
Waliewski, Thomas 

L.U. NO. 246 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

McMahon, Edward 



Schultz, Harry 
Stamm, Edward 
Vukas, William 

L.U. NO. 253 
OMAHA, NEBR. 

Blankman, Frank 
Chadwell, David W. 
Knox, George W. 
Larsen, Anders A. 
Noer, Chris 

L.U. NO. 257 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Cameron, Fred L. 
Gabriel. Fred A. 
Gioia. Joseph 
Graziano, John 
Hansen, Helmar T. 
Kurin, Edward 
Luksik, Walter 
Porges, Martin 
Reinertsen, Oliver 
Rose, Charles 
Sandberg, Thure A. 

L.U. NO. 261 
SCRANTON, PA. 

Bennie, Andrew 
Kulesa, Joseph 
Large, Alfred 
Lynn, Donald 
Tallman, Walter 

L.U. NO. 275 
NEWTON, MASS. 
Orzechowicz, Albert 

L.U. NO. 283 
AUGUSTA, GA. 

Glaze, Wade A. 
Goff, T. L. 

L.U. NO. 301 
NEWBURGH, N.Y. 

Wilhams, Innis 

L.U. NO. 335 
GRANT) RAPIDS, 
MICH. 

Snyder, Alvin 

L.U. NO. 372 
LIMA, OHIO 

Cook, Raymond 
Height, Ralph 

L.U. NO. 385 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Pusar, Morris 

L.U. NO. 403 
ALEXANDRIA, LA. 

Bowers, Frank W. 
Fausphoul. J. E. 
McDonald. Howard C. 

L.U. NO. 563 
GLENDALE, CALIF. 

Griffith, Paul F. 
Hansen, Martin 
Kampmeyer, A. F. 
Monrad, Christian M. 
Randall, Gus 
Stensrud, Curtis L. 
Waters, George W. 



L.U. NO. 586 

SACRAMENTO, 

CALIF. 

Benefield, Marion D. 
Burns, Robert A. 
Gluesing. Herbert L. 
Green, Robert E. 
Heller, Alanson J. 
Kelley, Hiram T. 
Melvin, Lloyd J. 
Plaster. Randolph M. 
Van Horn, Charles A. 

L.U. NO. 599 
HAMMOND, IND. 

Bergman, Antonius 
Haase, Charles 
Shipley, Roy 

L.U. NO. 608 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Frontain, Jean 
Horan. Timothy 
Lytle, John P. 
Miles, Roderick 
Sonday, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 626 

NEW CASTLE, DEL. 

Nitz, William S. 
Wilson, William J., Jr. 

L.U. NO. 639 
AKRON, OHIO 

Bales, A. L. 
Cinesi, Alexander 
Curtis, Clarence F. 
McElwain, Horace C. 
Moss. Newton M. 
Shuff, Robert E. 

L.U. NO. 651 
JACKSON, MICH. 

Herman. Ray 
Jones, Thom.as 
Koons, Wesley 
LaFayette, Whortley 
Weber, Carl 

L.U. NO. 725 
LITCHFIELD, ILL. 

Eskew, Ellsworth 

L.U. NO. 740 
BROOKLYN, N.Y. 

Erickson, E. 
Weigman, Eric 

L.U. NO. 842 
PLEASANTVILLE, N.J. 

Huenke, Edward J. 
Madeline, George 
Zeitschel, Charles F., Sr. 

L.U. NO. 845 
CLIFTON HEIGHTS, 
N.J. 

Crouse, Roscoe 
Ernst, Edward 
Napier, Donald 

L.U. NO. 848 

SAN BRUNO, CALIF. 

Miller, Ernest 
O'Neal, William 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



L.U. NO. 925 
SALINAS, CALIF. 

Brown, Delbert M. 
Butler, William F. 
Frost, George 
Kynard, George 
Phillips, P. D. 
Sawyer, Hector 
Temmermand, Layton 

L.U. NO. 937 
DUBUQUE, IOWA 

Schadle, Clarence 
Wickhara, William 

L.U. NO. 946 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Beazley, A. J. 
Belanger, John 
Bown, F. J. 
Davis, L. M. 
Fletcher, W. N. 
Foltz, Roy 
Graham, Charles 
Lindquist, S. R. 
Lingo, Ralph 
McClellan, Fred 
Manzer, Claude 
Preice, William 
Richmond, Forrest 
Schrager, Sam 
Stamp, W. H. 
Usadel, A. W. 
Vincent, James 
Young, James 

L.U. NO. 948 
SIOUX CITY, IOWA 

Berberich, Arthur 
Borsting, Conrad 

L.U. NO. 973 
TEXAS CITY, TEX. 

Landriault, A. D. 

L.U. NO. 982 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Whaley, Elmer 

L.U. NO. 1065 
SALEM, ORE. 

Hixson, Ralph 

L.U. NO. 1068 
VALLEJO, CALIF. 

Cleeton, V. E. 
McKean, A. 
Russell, G. 

L.U. NO. 1093 
GLEN COVE, N.Y. 

Dorber, Malcolm 
Lisa, Charles 
Olsen, Lester 

L.U. NO. 1098 
BATON ROUGE, LA. 

Atwell, W. F. 
McBride, R. V. 
Ventress, Leslie 

L.U. NO. 1135 
PORT JEFFERSON, 

N.Y. 

Pfeiffer, Arnold 

L.U. NO. 1138 
TOLEDO, OHIO 

Kovach, Joseph 



L.U. NO. 1140 

SAN PEDRO, CALIF. 

Bauknight, Shelby 
Darnaby, Robert F. 
Gloyne, Leroy 
McNeal, J. J. 
Mello, M. V. 
Miller, Leonard W. 
Pedigo, Ross 
Spain, Delbert C. 
Taft, Rufus H. 
WiUiamson, Albert A. 

L.U. NO. 1160 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Anderson, Carl O. 

L.U. NO. 1164 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Funke, Wilhelm 
Kushar, Frank 
Monachino, Saverio 
Poelker, Herman 
Rother, Joseph 
Sackman, Barnet 
Santosnosso, Giovanni 
Simonsen, Walter 
Weyl, Michael 
Winkler, Gustav 

L.U. NO. 1172 
BILLINGS, MONT. 

Collins, F. P. 
Miller, Albert F. 

L.U. NO. 1175 
KINGSTON, N.Y. 

Kelly, Marshall J. 
Schline, Gilbert A. 
Winchell, Clarence C. 

L.U. NO. 1256 
SARNIA, ONT. 

Alix, Joseph Rouville 
Soim'nen, Viljo 

L.U. NO. 1266 
AUSTIN, TEXAS 

Harbeson, L. F. 
Peters, E. W. 

L.U. NO. 1273 
EUGENE, ORE. 

Ackerson, Darrell C. 
Hayden, Edward F. 
Patrick, Glenn R. 

L.U. NO. 1323 
MONTEREY, CALIF. 

Reinke, Julius 
Spencer, Elmer 

L.U. NO. 1367 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Kozza, Salvator 
Zaraza, Edward 

L.U. NO. 1397 
NORTH HEMPSTEAD, 

N.Y. 

Baptist, Arthur 

Wylie, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 1400 
SANTA MONICA, 
CALIF. 

Boyd, Howard E. 
Deitering, E. J. 
Hereth, Howard 



Loether, John L. 
McPhillips, Robert J. 
Montgomery, T. O. B. 
Schindler, C. E. 
Symes, Charles E. 
Witthauer, Glen L. 

L.U. NO. 1407 
WILMINGTON, CALIF. 

Darling, Cecil 
Garcia, Silverio 

L.U. NO. 1408 
REDWOOD CITY, 
CALIF. 

Flaten, Arnie 
Foulds, Robert 
Jewell, J. D. 
Johnson, Edwin C. 
Koeman, Peter 
Lawson, Roy T. 
Murphy, James 
Myers, Wilham E. 
Oppenhimer, Joseph 
Orvik, Moody 
Strand, Peder 

L.U. NO. 1416 
NEW BEDFORD, 
MASS. 

Camacho, James 
Faria, Antone 
Fredette, Henry 
Marques, Joseph 
Martin, John 

L.U. NO. 1453 
HUNTINGTON 
BEACH, CALIF. 

Badten, Eldo A. 
Blair, Lloyd J. 
Brown, Robert W. 
Coughron, John 
Dolshaw, George 
Jordan, Harry B. 
Lee, Leslie 
Minor, John 
Richards, David 
Sher. Abraham 
Storm, E. W. 

L.U. NO. 1456 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Callahan, Michael 
Carlson, Ellis 
Desmarais, Aime 
Hansen, William 
Hauck, Chris 
Lindholm, Gustaf 
Lundin. Sven W. 
McMahon. John 
Michelsen, John 
Olsen, Ole 
Phelan, William 
Sedig, Antti 
Soderman, Horace 
Thompson, Gotfred 

L.U. NO. 1513 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Hodess, Sam 
Stein, David 

L.U. NO. 1515 
PENSACOLA, FLA. 

Gylnquist, Ted 

L.U. NO. 1518 
GULFPORT, MISS. 

Winterstein, Chester 

L.U. NO. 1541 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 

Strom, Jack 



L.U. NO. 1564 
CASPER, WYO. 

Moore, Ralph 
Sauter, Frank W. 
Stalkup, Raymond E. 

L.U. NO. 1590 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Bass, Ernest R. 
Bell, James W. 
Britt, James 
Burroughs, Joseph 
Carlson, Carl O. 
Colbertson, Andrew 
Couch, W. H. 
Ercolani, Fred 
Howe, Claude L. 
Julku, Armas 
Keppler, Harry W. 
Larson, Gunnar 
Praught, Daniel 

L.U. NO. 1784 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Tietz, Nick 
Wuttke, Eric 

L.U. NO. 1846 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Francisco, Albert E. 

L.U. NO. 1889 
DOWNERS GROVE, 
ILL. 

Lawry, John 

L.U. NO. 1934 
BEMIDJI, MINN. 

Heiden, Theodore 
Konoski, Richard 

L.U. NO. 1971 
TEMPLE, TEX. 

Brooks, Grant W., Sr. 

L.U. NO. 2046 
MARTINEZ, CALIF. 

Bell, George 
Bury, Tom 
Inglish, Carl 
Parsons, Elton 
Peterman, O. J. 
Postele, Charles 
Schiller, Willard 
Wolfe, Frank A. 



L.U. NO. 2084 
ASTORIA, ORE. 

Yaakola, Arthur E. 

L.U. NO. 2203 
ANAHEIM, CALIF. 

Percival, Leo 

L.U. NO. 2235 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Banka, Michael D., Sr. 

L.U. NO. 2250 
RED BANK, N.J. 

Argila, Joseph 
Drake, Charles 
Kubichek, Rudolph 
Zacek, Leopold 

L.U. NO. 2308 
FULLERTON, CALIF. 

Lantz, Billy B. 
Niemela, Wayne E. 

L.U. NO. 2310 
MADISONVILLE, KY. 

Groves, Samuel P. 

L.U. NO. 2311 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Gibson, Roy L. 

L.U. NO. 2375 
WILMINGTON, CAL. 

Burton, Roll D. 
Cline, Gordon B. 
Dye, John G. 
Estep, Clyde 
Jackson, Andrew S. 
King, Graham E. 
Rich, Alva 
Vaughan, Bert 

L.U. NO. 2411 
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 

Duke, Charles S. 

L.U. NO. 3119 
TACOMA, WASH. 

Becker, Frances B. 
Grandall, Theodore W. 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 




Audel. Theodore 


31 


Belsaw Power Tools 


36 


Belsaw Sharp-All Co 


27 


Chevrolet 


5 
11 


Chicago Technical College 


Chne-Sigmon, Publishers 


33 


Craftsman Book Co 


12 


DeSoto Tool Co 


33 


Eliason Stair Gauge Co 


27 


Estwing Manufacturing 


32 


Foley Manufacturing 


28 


Goldblatt Tool Co 


37 


Irwin Auger Bit Co 


31 


Locksmithing Institute 


34 


No. Amer. School of Drafting . . 


34 


Skil Corporation 


9 


Stanley Power Tools . . Back Cover | 


Vaughan and Bushnell 


15 



APRIL, 1973 



39 



IN CONCLUSION 



ENOUGH WAGES 

TO 

BUY BACK WHAT'S 

PRODUCED 

The danger signals of the 1920's 

and 19 30' 5 cause us to worry 

about the moneychangers 

in America's marketplace 



■ Those of us who are old enough to remember 
the Depression of the 1930's are becoming a bit 
apprehensive about the way the economic picture 
of North America seems to be developing. There 
are too many parallels between the conditions 
which exist today and those which existed in the 
1920"s, which laid the ground work for the de- 
bacle of the 30's. 

Reduced to the simplest terms, what happened 
in the 1920's was that too much of the profits of 
industry went to money lenders and stockholders, 
while too little went to the wage earners producing 
the goods and services 

By the 1930"s, the people who produced the 
abundance of products on the market could not 
buy back the things they produced, because wage 
rates did not keep up with escalating profits and 
interest rates. Eventually, the demand for goods 
diminished to the point where there were not 
enough customers to purchase the output of our 
factories. 

Mass layoffs ensued, and the disastrous down- 
ward cycle moved into high gear. Every plant 
layoff reduced the national purchasing power and 
this triggered still further layoffs. 

IN THE LAST COUPLE OF YEARS it is ob- 
vious that the Executive Branch of the Federal 
Government is following policies which come close 
to emulating the policies of the 1920's, which 
proved to be so disastrous thereafter. 

Way back in 1969, Congress, by a large ma- 
jority in both Houses, passed an anti-inflation bill. 
The bill gave the President immediate power to 
freeze prices, wages, interest, rent. etc. The Presi- 
dent signed the bill, but he declined to implement 
it for some 22 months. By then, inflation was run- 
ning wild. 

In August of 1971, the President announced a 
90-day freeze on wages and prices. The freeze 
turned out to be httle more than window dressing 
slanted toward holding down wages but allowing 
profits to escalate. 

Shortly thereafter, he instituted Phase 11. Phase 
II also proved to be a farce. It imposed rigid re- 
strictions on wage increases, but it did little or 
nothing to really hold down profits or prices. 

Now we are struggling with Phase III, which 
holds very little more promise than Phase II did. 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



Under these various phases, the economic cli- 
mate that proved so disastrous in the 1920's is 
repeating itself. Interest rates are skyrocketing. 
Naturally, interest rates place the major burden 
on working people who have to buy things by 
time payments. Whenever they buy a home or a 
car or any major apphance that involves a time 
contract, they pay through the nose for the privi- 
lege of having decent credit. The more they pay 
in interest charges, the less money they have to buy 
more goods. 

On the other hand, the wealthy pay cash and. in 
fact, many of them gained their wealth by loaning 
out money at high interest rates. 

IN THE 1920"s, the federal government had lit- 
tle to say about the major social problems plaguing 
the nation at that time. The states and municipali- 
ties had the responsibility for providing all the 
social services that were necessary. 

This system failed to meet many of the most 
urgent needs of ordinary citizens. Too many states 
and municipalities were dominated by a few in- 
dustrialists and power brokers who were little dis- 
posed to alter the status quo which served them 
so well at the expense of the ordinary people. 

Now, the President wants to return to the state 
governors and municipal mayors the responsibility 
for meeting the social obligations of government. 

Unfortunately, the situation has changed very 
little from the 1920"s. Too many state govern- 
ments are dominated completely by power inter- 
ests with selfish motives. 

In the 1930's and 1940's, the federal govern- 
ment adopted legislation which created Social 
Security, expansion of hospitals, aid to education, 
protection of bank deposits, etc. 

It was the federal government which first initi- 
ated campaigns to preserve our natural resources 
so that future generations can derive some of the 
benefits. This involved overcoming the opposition 
of the oil lobbies, the mineral interests, and other 
groups which exploited our natural resources. Any 
hope that state governments alone can overcome 
the problems in this area is wishful thinking. 

Add to this situation the fact that the dollar is 
in real trouble internationally because other na- 
tions have lost confidence in the stability of our 
economy, and you have a very dangerous situation 
facing the United States. 



I am no economist, and I do not pretend to have 
ready answers for the current dilemma, but I feel 
sure that danger threatens unless there is a reversal 
of most of the policies being followed by the 
present administration. 

Labor must receive enough in wages so that it 
can buy back the bulk of the products it produces. 

There are only two real cost factors in the pro- 
duction of goods. One is the cost of labor; the 
other is the cost of capital. Whenever capital gets 
too far out of line, trouble is inevitable. 

I sincerely hope that the Administration does 
its homework in respect to the conditions which 
brought about the Great Depression of the 
1930^5. ■ 




GENERAL PRESIDENT 



APRIL, 1973 



K^P.I i^fl 


ts the chat 



I 



smoother work for you) 




STANLEY^ 



INDUSTRIAL 



BALL BEARING 

HEAVY DUTY 
SABRE SAW 

^-. TYPE ■ MOOH ^ 

(!Ms76 .01 ^a 

ii«i*f 3.0 



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PATENT NUMBERS 



THe STANLEY WORKS 



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mM 



Model 76 
$68.40 



No chatter. No rough edges. Less blade breakage. 
With Stanley sabre saws, a patented anti-vibration 
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Felt seals at each end of the plunger provide con- 
stant lubrication. Keeps oil in - dirt out. Like on 
our Model 76. A real "do anything saw." Cuts 
curves, scrolls, fancy patterns - or rips 2" lumber 
and Va" steel, aluminum, brass and other metals. 
An oversized fan directs its powerful air blast to- 
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An adjustable 2-position, non-marring base lets 
you flush cut right up to a vertical surface. 

P.S.: made by the same Stanley that 




If that's not enough reason to buy a Stanley, con- 
sider this. The Model 76 is equipped with sealed 
ball-bearings to give you smooth transmittal of 
power from its 3.0 amp Stanley-made motor to 
the blade end of the saw. Separate handle for cool 
comfort and more control. Single slotted screw to 
hold blade rigid. See the complete line of Stanley 
sabre saws at your distributor. Stanley Power 
Tools, Division of The 
Stanley Works, New 
Bern, North Carolina 

28560. helps >ou do things right 

makes the finest hand tools. 



STANLEY 



The 



MAY 1973 




Official Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA • FOUNDED 1881 




NEW ORLEANS, LAND OF DREAMS-T/ie French Quarfer in New Orleans, Louisiana, holds 
behind its shuttered windows and grillwork balconies all the charm and romanticism of yesteryear. 
Its narrow streets bespeak a bygone era when Frenchmen, Spaniards, pirates, and river boatmen 
walked abroad in the sunshine of the Mississippi Delta. 





GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Herbert C. Skinner 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

William Konyha 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 
Charles E. Nichols 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Patrick J. Campbell 

130 North Main Street 

New City, Rockland Co., New York 

10956 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

130 Mountain Avenue 
Springfield, New Jersey 07081 
Third District, Anthony Ochocki 
18400 Grand River Avenue, 
Detroit, Michigan 48223 

Fourth District, Harold E. Lewis 

2970 Peachtree Rd., N.W., Suite 300 
Atlanta, Ga. 30305 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
2800 Selkirk Drive 
Burnsville, Minn. 55378 



Sixth District, Frederick N. BtJT,L 
Glenbrook Center West — Suite 501 
1140 N.W. 63rd Street 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73116 
Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, M. B. Bryant 

Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 

Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District.WiLLiAM Stefanovitch 

2418 Central Avenue 

Windsor, Ontario, Canada 

Tenth District, Eldon T. Staley 
4706 W. Saanich Rd. 
RR #3, Victoria, B. C. 




William Sidell, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

If your local union wishes to list de- 
ceased members in the "In Memoriam" 
page of The Carpenter, it is necessary 
that a specific request be directed to the 
editor. 



In processing complaints, the only 
names which the financial secretary needs 
to send in are the names of members 
who are NOT receiving the magazine. 
In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. Members who die or are sus- 
pended are automatically dropped from 
the mailing list of The Carpenter. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine, which requires 
six to eight weelis. However this does not advise your own local union of 
your address change. You must notify your local union by some other 
method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME- 



Local No 

Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS. 



City 



State or Province 



ZIP Code 



THE 



(§ZA\E[P 




■ffl LABOR PRESS fA 




VOLUME XCIII No. 5 MAY, 1973 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Building Trades Legislative Conference 2 

Brotherhood Luncheon in Washington, D. C 5 

Labor To Work with Mayors to Save Jobs, Housing 6 

Brotherhood Deplores Attitude in Lumber Industry 8 

Hutcheson Plaque Unveiled at Headquarters 9 

Hardened Nails Can Be Hazardous 10 

Early Carpenters Created Fabulous Merry-Go-Rounds 11 

O'Sullivan Visits Israel 12 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 7 

Canadian Report Morden Lazarus 15 

Service to the Brotherhood 17 

Local Union News 25 

Apprenticeship and Training 30 

Plane Gossip 32 

cue Report 33 

We Congratulate 35 

In Memoriam 36 

In Conclusion William Sidell 40 



POSTMASTERS. ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER. Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave.. N.W.. Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E.. Washington. D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20^ in advance. 

Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

Last month, the mighty Mississippi 
River rose threateningly around the 
crescent bend of the famous old city 
of New Orleans, Louisiana. 

People gathered along the river 
bank and the wharfs of the Vieux 
Carre — the French Quarter — to watch 
U.S. engineers and workmen bolster 
the levees. To remove the threat of 
high water, the Bonne Carre Spillway 
was opened 35 miles north of the city, 
and the rushing, brown waters were 
allowed to flow eastward to the Gulf 
of Mexico and away from the city. 

Once again, the mistress of the 
Delta had faced her troubles with cool 
and poised calm. 

Our cover picture this month looks 
through the elaborate iron grillwork 
of the Le Prete Mansion toward the 
spire of the St. Louis Cathedral and 
Jackson Square (the Place d'Armes), 
where the huge Louisiana Territory 
became part of the Union in 1803. 
The ornamental grillwork has framed 
many historic scenes since the build- 
ings surrounding Jackson Square were 
erected more than a century and a 
half ago. 

NOTE: Readers who would like copies 
of tills cover iifiiiiarrcd by a inuiling label 
may obiain liiein by seiidini; lOf in coin 
w cover mailing costs to the Editor, The 
CARPENTER, 101 Constitution Ave., 
N.W., Washington. D.C. 20001. 





BUILDING TRADES CONFERENCE 

CALLS FOR ACTION ON MANY FRONTS 



Brotherhood Delegates Form Largest Group Attending Legislative And Safety Conference 



■ Where do the Building Trades 
stand on pension reform? tax re- 
form? wage and price stabilization? 
foreign trade? 

The picture became a little clearer 
for U.S. Congressmen and Senators, 
last month, as 4,000 Building Trades 
leaders assembled in Washington, 
D.C., for their 17th national legis- 
lative conference. 

Giving voice and weight to the 
busy proceedings were more than 
700 Brotherhood delegates — the 
biggest international union contin- 
gent in the four-day parley. 

Prolonged applause and standing 
ovations went to congressmen and 
senators from both parties who 
joined in labor's concern over con- 
tinued high unemployment, soaring 
prices, curbs on trade union rights 
and the impounding and morato- 
riums that threaten to scuttle hous- 
ing and public works projects. 



That's why they had come to 
Washington — to press their home 
state congressional delegations for 
commitments on the legislative pro- 
gram of the AFL-CIO Building & 
Construction Trades Department. 

BCTD Secretarj'-Treasurer Rob- 
ert A. Georgine told the delegates 
that their past efforts "have been a 
powerful factor" in winning support 
for former goals that have now be- 
come law. Georgine presided be- 
cause President Frank Bonadio was 
hospitalized with pneumonia. 

Speakers included President Nix- 
on, House Republican Leader Ger- 
ald Ford, AFL-CIO President 
George Meany and many more. 

House Speaker Carl Albert was 
warmly applauded as he spoke of 
the impoundment and veto battles 
with the White House, and de- 
clared: "I don't want to see the New 
Deal, the Fair Deal, the New Fron- 



tier and the Great Society scrapped 
by the impoundment process, and I 
don't think you do either." 

Nixon, after making a spirited 
defense of Labor Secretary Peter J. 
Brennan's role in the minimum 
wage controversy, thanked Ameri- 
ca's workers for their support of 
the "tough decisions" he has had to 
make to achieve an honorable peace 
in Vietnam. 

America's prisoners of war re- 
turned home "with honor," Nixon 
said, because of "support from the 
men in this room and those you rep- 
resent across the country." 

He said he didn't enjoy vetoing 
bills but considered it necessary for 
the economy. 

Two Republican senators who 
expressed sharp disagreement with 
various portions of the Administra- 
tion program received standing ova- 
Continued on page 4 



THE CARPENTER 




RICHARD M. NIXON 
President, United States 

President Nixon told Confer- 
ence delegates that those who 
advocate slashing the Defense 
budget would destroy any chance 
of negotiating further nuclear 
disarmament. 

He said cutbacks in defense 
spending would make the United 
States impotent at negotiations 
for a mutual reduction of forces 
in Europe. 

The President spent much of 
his 15-minute talk thanking 
construction workers for backing 
him on his policies on South 
Vietnam. 



GERALD FORD 
House Miniority Leader 

The delegates to the Legislative 
Conference vented their feelings 
about Administration domestic 
policies during an address by 
House Republican Leader Gerald 
Ford. Though Ford has been a 
longtime friend of the Brother- 
hood and of the Building Trades, 
delegates did not buy his claim 
that '"our economy in 1973 is 
strong and getting stronger . . . 
Jobs are up, unemployment is 
down." 



GEORGE MEANY 
President, AFL-CIO 

The AFL-CIO President, who 
had been sitting among the 
delegates during the President's 
speech, came to the platform 
only after Nixon left. 

He lashed out at the inequity 
in the Administration's economic 
controls. 

Meany made a sharp point 
when he complained about a 
U. S. -sponsored Export-Import 
Bank loan of $90,000,000 to the 
Soviet Union at only six percent 
interest. "I'd like to know," 
Meany told the Congressmen, 
"why the hell Uncle Sam can't 
get some of my members 6% 
mortgage money on their homes." 



\~ d. 


WA 





JACOB K. JAVITS 
New York Senator 

Senator Javits termed the 
Administration's bill for Federal 
Unemployment Compensation 
standards "woefully inadequate" 
and expressed his opposition to 
prohibiting states from paying 
unemployment benefits to strikers 
after a suitable waiting period. 

He put top priority on reform 
of pension and welfare programs 
affecting 35 million workers, 
$150 billion in assets, growing 
at the rate of $10 billion a 
year. He called for U. S. 
government insurance of pension 
plans, and he termed it 
"absolutely essential" for workers 
to have an opportunity for 
vesting pension funds. 






f^ fM^^ 




CARL ALBERT 
Speal(er of tlie House 

House Speaker Carl Albert 
was warmly applauded as he 
spoke of recent impoundment 
and veto battles with the White 
House, and he declared; "I don't 
want to see the New Deal, the 
Fair Deal, the New Frontier and 
the Great Society scrapped by 
the impoundment process, and 
I don't think you do either." 

The House Speaker told the 
Conference that he supports 
legislation to permit on-site 
picketing in the construction 
industry and will work to get 
such legislation through the 
House of Representatives. 



R. S. SCHWEIKER 

Pennsylvania Senator 

The Administration must free 
Federal funds for domestic 
construction. Senator Schweiker 
told the delegates. 

"The cutbacks in many of our 
social, educational, and health 
programs really hits the construc- 
tion industry," The Pennsylvania 
solon said. "They mean cutting 
back school buildings, hospital 
buildings, day-care center 
buildings, housing, and high- 
ways." 

"We need money for our 
programs here at home," he 
said. 



HENRY M. JACKSON 
Washington Senator 

The Chairman of the Senate 
Interior and Insular Affairs 
Committee lashed out at the 
Nixon Administration's domestic 
programs. He told delegates: 

"What we are witnessing now 
is an old, old scenario: tight 
money, high interest rates, and 
people out of work. 

"We have an economic policy 
in this nation that is being run 
by the 'abominable snowman.' 
You can't find him, but his big 
footprints are all over the place. 

"What should be thawed is 
frozen, with money for sound 
programs which you and I know 
provide jobs." 



JOHN STENDER 

Ass't. Secretary of Labor 

John Stender, the new 
Assistant Secretary of Labor 
for Occupational Safety and 
Health, endorsed President 
Nixon's emphasis on "decentral- 
izing" government programs, 
including health and safety 
protection. 

Contending that Washington 
"does not have the feel for your 
local problems," Stender said, 
"That is why the President is 
determined to give capable state 
and local officials the resources 
which they previously lacked to 
solve some of their own 
problems." 



MAY, 1973 




Building Trades 



CLIC Director Charles Nichols, right, 
discusses Brotherhood participation in 
conference with Legislative Advocate 
Jim Bailey, center, and staff assistant 
Mark Stout. 



Mrs. Sue Dillon, secretary to the Gene- 
eral President, registers Brotherhood dele- 
gates Lee Knitter and Arthur Selles, both 
of Local 898, Detroit, and Herman Bo- 
gantz. Local 735, Mansfield, O. 




House Speaker Carl Albert, right, is escorted into the conference bj Brotherhood Leg- 
islative Advocate Jim Bailey (behind him) and a group of Carpenters and other Build- 
ing Tradesmen. 




Congresswoman Martha Griffiths of 
Michigan discusses legislative matters 
with Brotherhood escorts. 



General President William Sidell ac- 
knowledges his introduction at the con- 
ference opening. 




House Minoritj' Leader Gerald Ford talks about Issues on Capitol Hill with Brother- 
hood members and other Building Tradesmen in an anteroom of the conference hotel. 



Continued from page 2 

tions from the delegates. 

Sen. Richard S. Schweiker (R- 
Pa.) sharply criticized the impound- 
ment by the White House of funds 
for social programs voted by Con- 
gress. And Sen. Jacob K. Javits (R- 
N.Y.) termed the Administration's 
bill for federal unemployment com- 
pensation standards "woefully in- 
adequate." 

Senators Henry M. Jackson CD- 
Wash.) and Edward M. Kennedy 
(D-Mass.) were interrupted with ap- 
plause after almost every paragraph 
as they ripped into the Administra- 
tion for mismanaging the economy. 

The continuing drive for on-site 
picketing rights in the construction 
industry remains the department's 
key objective, Georgine said at the 
opening of the conference. And a 
number of speakers dealt with the 
issue. 

Brennan hinted that President 
Nixon may support a bill to allow 
construction workers the same right 
to picket at their work site that 
unions have in other industries. 

He said some congressmen are 
still resentful at having risked the 
political enmity of business groups 
by voting for repeal of the "right-to- 
work" S^ection 14(b) of the^ Taft- 
Hartley Act in the 89th Congress, 
only to see it killed by a Senate fili- 
buster. 

"I believe I can put it through the 
House if you will get it through the 
Senate," he said. 

This year's legislative conference 
included a full day devoted to safety 
issues. 

House Labor Committee Chair- 
man Carl D. Perkins (D-Ky.) chided 
the Labor Dept. for requesting in- 
adequate appropriations, hiring too 
few safety inspectors and attempt- 
ing to shift enforcement responsi- 
bilities to the states. 

Rep. William A. Steiger (R-Wis.), 
a key sponsor of the federal job 
safety law, warned of a renewed 
drive that he said was backed by 
the John Birch Society to exempt 
firms with 25 or fewer workers from 
the law. 

Following the formal sessions, 
the building trades delegates de- 
voted two days to meetings with 
their consressmen and senators. ■ 



THE CARPENTER 



"f^: S »S«ii*J^t;'< 



Mm 



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<^m. 



A-^ 



c 



The International Ballroom Center al titi.' ^\ ashiiijifon Hilton Hotel was filled with more than 700 Carpenter leaders from all over 
the United States to hear General President Sidell and other General Officers describe the Brotherhood's progress in achieving 
long-range goals. 



Washington Luncheon Outlines 73 Work; 
Sidell Announces Regional Conferences 



H Brotherhood delegates to the 
Building Trades Legislative Confer- 
ence assembled tor their own get- 
together, at a noon luncheon April 18. 

They heard brief reports from the 
General Officers on their special areas 
of work and a rousing speech by 
Father Joseph Donahue, longtime 
friend of the Brotherhood. 

A highlight of the program was a 
comprehensive talk by General President 
William Sidell in which he expressed a 
determination to involve the entire mem- 




Father Joseph Donahue speaks. 



bership in the Brotherhood's expanding 
organizing program and in its battle 
against the open shop. 

"We must put our house in order," he 
said. "We are going to have to re-evalu- 
ate our policies, our practices, and our 
objectives to meet the needs of what 
obviously is an ever-changing industry. 
Building techniques are changing: labor 
relations are becoming more sophisti- 
cated: and legislation is growing more 
complex." 

He announced plans for a series of six 
grassroots, regional conferences "to en- 
compass the entire membership and to 
be devoted to those issues which will 
confront our organization and the future 
course of our organization for years to 
come." 

He stressed that basic issues will be 
discussed, and he urged assembled dele- 
gales to prepare to send their fulltime of- 
ficers and representatives to the confer- 
ences. 

The schedule of conferences is as fol- 
lows: First and Ninth Districts, Boston, 
Mass., July 8-11; Third and Ninth Dis- 
tricts, Detroit, Mich., July 15-18: Second 
and Fourth Districts, Atlanta, Ga., July 
29-August 1: Fifth and Sixth Districts, 
Kansas City, Mo.. August 26-29: Eighth 
District. Los Angeles, Calif., September 
18-21: and Seventh and Tenth Districts, 
Spokane, Wash., September 23-26. 





The General 
Officers at the 
microphone 
during the 
luncheon. 



MAY, 1973 




A delegation of mayors meets with AFL-CIO President George Meany to 
seeli — and get — labor's help in a drive to obtain federal funds to continue 
public service employment, summer jobs for youth and housing programs. 
With Meany are, from foreground: AFL-CIO Legislative Director Andrew J. 
Biemiller, Mayor James McGee of Dayton, Mayor Roman S. Gribbs of Detroit, 
Mayor Henry W. Maier of Milwaukee and Mayor Kevin White of Boston. 



Labor to Work With Mayors 
To Save Jobs, Housing Programs 



The AFL-CIO will "work closely" with 
the nation's mayors to continue federal 
funding of public service jobs, summer 
employment for teenagers and housing 
programs, Federation President George 
Meany said recently. 

The crisis of the nation's cities "has 
not diminished in the slightest," Meany 
said after meeting at AFL-CIO head- 
quarters with a delegation from the U.S. 
Conference of Mayors. 

At a later news conference. Detroit 
Mayor Roman S. Gribbs spoke grimly of 
the problems the nation's cities face this 
summer as a result of the Administra- 
tion's budget squeeze, impounding of 
funds appropriated by Congress and veto 
threats. 

An earlier meeting with President 
Nixon, Gribbs said, had left the mayors 
with the impression that the Administra- 
tion would be responsive to the urgency 
of funding summer job programs for 
needy youth. 

Their hopes were dashed, however, 
when a White House announcement made 
it clear that money for summer jobs 
would have to be taken from federal 
funds Congress had voted for the emer- 
gency public service employment pro- 
gram. 

Gribbs gave this summary of the di- 
lemma facing the mayors: 

"There are no new federal funds for 
summer jobs for young people living in 
cities contained in the White House 
statement. 

"The Administration proposal simply 
forces the nation's mayors to choose be- 



tween laying off a father to hire his son. 

"Either way you slice it, the cities 
stand to lose the $320 million that the 
federal government provided last year 
solely for summer youth programs." 

The mayors said they came to the 
AFL-CIO for help because both groups 
were allies in getting the public employ- 
ment program passed by Congress and 
in persuading the President to sign the 
1971 bill into law. 



Now, the Administration wants to let 
the program die and has threatened a 
veto if Congress renews it. 

"If this deadlock is not broken," the 
statement by the Conference of Mayors 
warned, "if an agreement is not reached, 
unemployment will go up. Services will 
go unrendered. Mayors will be faced with 
the unhappy job of firing thousands of 
urban residents. All our efforts will be in 
vain." 

Their statement deplored also the 
Administration's freeze on approvals of 
federally assisted housing for low and 
moderate income families. The housing 
cutoff "is one of the most serious situa- 
tions facing the cities today," the mayors 
said. 

The delegation that met with Meany 
included, in addition to Gribbs, Mayor 
W. Maier of Milwaukee, Mayor James 
McGee of Dayton, O., and Mayor Kevin 
White of Boston. 

Meany's statement of support called on 
Congress to pass bills dealing with public 
service employment, summer jobs and 
housing by margins "big enough to dis- 
courage the President from his threat to 
use the veto power indiscriminately and 
unwisely." 

And, Meany added, "in the event he 
fails to heed that message from Congress, 
then it must, as a matter of simple justice, 
override his vetoes." 

The public employment program cur- 
rently provides funds for about 150,000 
jobs. The Conference of Mayors termed 
the program "a necessity" and said that 
it should be expanded, not scrapped. 

In many of the nation's central cities, 
the mayors said, unemployment is double 
and even triple the national rate. 

Milwaukee's Mayor Maier warned at 
the news conference that the Administra- 
tion's budget cuts "are adding up to 
another package of social dynamite." 



ConstrucHon Costs Increase 9.3% In Year; 
Materials Costs Up, Labor Rates Down, Says Dodge 



The cost of construction male- 
rials and labor across the nation 
increased an average of 9.3% for 
the year ending March 31, com- 
pared to 7.4% a year earlier, it 
was reported last month by the 
Dodge Building Cost Services De- 
partment of McGraw-Hill Infor- 
mation Systems Company. 

Accounting for the 12-month 
climb was an average 9.8% rise in 
building materials cost, plus a 
moderate rise in wage rates of 
7.3%. A year earlier, craftsmen's 
wages had jumped 9.2%. 

The information released by 
Dodge Building Cost Services is 
based on its semi-annual survey of 



building trades unions, contractors, 
and materials suppliers in 183 
cities in the continental United 
States. Since the completion of the 
last survey in October 1972, costs 
increased a significant 5.7% com- 
pared to a 3.3% in the previous 
six-month period. 

For the 12-month period ending 
March 31, cost gains were general- 
ly highest among the New England 
States, 10.7%. The Metropolhan 
New York/New Jersey area, usual- 
ly the leader in costs increases, 
showed a rise of 9.6%. The Mis- 
sissippi River and West Central 
States area posted the smallest in- 
crease for the year, 8.2%. 



THE CARPENTER 




ROUNDUP 



CALIFORNIA, FLORIDA LIAD— More than a quarter of all new housing units authorized hy 
permits in 1972 was concentrated in California and Florida, according to the Bu- 
reau of the Census, part of the U.S. Department of Commerce's Social and Economic 
Statistics Administration. 

A preliminary report issued hy the Bureau indicated that of 2,150,000 units 
authorized for the United States in 1972, 562,000 were in the two states. The 
total authorized in Florida was 282,000 and California was second with 280,000. 

Other states with big totals of authorized housing were Texas, with 128,000 
units; New York, 91,000; and Ohio, 85,000. 

Among the metropolitan areas, the greatest number of units, 55,000 was , 
authorized in Chicago. Totals for other metropolitan areas were Los Angeles, 
53,000; Hew York, 51,000; Miami, 50,000; and Tampa-St. Petersburg, 47,000. 

METRIC PROTECTION— Any conversion to the metric system of weights and measures must 
protect workers who have much to lose, the AFL-CIO has told a Congressional com- 
mittee. 

Testifying on the metric system before the House Subcommittee on Science, 
Research and Development, AFL-CIO Legislative Representative Kenneth Peterson 
declared: 

"Workers' tools, which they frequently provide at their own expense, would 
become obsolete. Education and retraining would become necessary. Some workers 
may lose their jobs or lose opportunities for promotion as the result of lack of 
familiarity with the metric system. 

"The AFL-CIO, therefore, strongly urges that any legislation dealing with 
metric conversion must provide compensation and adjustment assistance to workers 
for the cost of tools, the cost of education and retraining,, and other conversion 
transition costs, including relocation, job loss, downgrading and loss of income 
or promotion opportunities as a result of workers' lack of familiarity with the 
metric system." 

WOMEN WORKERS— The Census Bureau concludes that "a growing proportion of Ameri- 
can wives are their families' chief breadwinners." It found that wives earned 
more than husbands in some 7.4 percent of husband-wife families in 1970, whereas 
wives provided most of the income in only 5.7 percent of such families ten years 
earlier. 



OVERSEAS TAX BREAKS-APL-CIO President George Meany has strongly urged the 
elimination of tax subsidies for U.S. multinational corporations investing and 
profiting overseas as part of a "tax justice" program of loophole closing that 
will raise some $20 billion in badly-needed federal revenue. 

Elimination of these preferences is an essential part of the Burke-Hartke 
bill designed to curb the present flood of imports and the exportation of some 
900,000 American job opportunities. 



JOBLESS RATE— The nation's unemployment rate remained "essentially unchanged" at 
5 percent in March, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported. The BLS said the 
number of persons who were looking for jobs but could not find them was 4.4 
million after seasonal adjustment, "roughly the same as the levels that have 
prevailed since last November." 



MAY, 1973 



Brotherhood Deplores 
What the Traffic Will Bear' 
Attitude in Lumber Industry 

Tells Cost of Living Council That 
Federal Government Should Assert 
'Substantially More Influence 



■ Lumber prices are out of con- 
trol, but wages in the lumber indus- 
try are not, the Brotherhood told 
the Cost of Living Council in Wash- 
ington, D.C., last month. 

So stating, the Brotherhood went 
on to offer specific recommenda- 
tions for easing the current lumber 
crisis and in a comprehensive state- 
ment pinpointed some of the ways 
in which the Council might effec- 
tively restrain lumber prices. 

These were some of the recom- 
mendations: 

• Do not add additional wage 
controls. 

"Wages are already subject to 
the regulations of Phase III," the 
statement said. "The 1973 nego- 
tiated increases are reasonable and 
approvable under current regula- 
tions. Therefore, there is no need 
for additional wage controls in the 
industry." 

• Increase the volume of avail- 
able lumber. 

"We are convinced that the vol- 
ume of available timber does di- 
rectly affect the resulting price of 
lumber and, therefore, to the extent 
that the amount of available timber 
can be influenced, the price of lum- 
ber can be influenced." 

® The Federal government 
shosild assert more influence in the 
industry. 

"In view of the fact that such a 
significant portion of available tim- 
ber is controlled by the Federal 
government, we are convinced that 
the Federal government could as- 
sert substantially more influence 



within this industry than it has to 
date." 

• Price restraints are needed, 
whether voluntary or involuntary. 

"As to who initiates lumber price 
increases, we feel there is no clear 
evidence," said the statement. "Fin- 
gers appear to be pointed at the 
builder, the retailer, the distribu- 
tor, the broker, and the mills. Under 
the current situation, whereby the 
demand for lumber is greater than 
the supply of lumber, the rule ap- 
pears to be 'whatever the traffic will 
bear' at all levels. In situations 
where the increase can be passed 
on, it is the consumer who even- 
tually pays. In those situations 
where the increased cost of lumber 
cannot be passed on, such individ- 
uals or firms must absorb it, give 
up their contract, or fold." 

• Roil back lumber prices with 
"minimum hurt." 

"It appears to us that the follow- 
ing approach could effectuate lower 
lumber prices, increase the lumber 
supply, and minimize the hurt. The 



Cost of Living Council could place 
a ceiling at present levels until a 
specified date in the near future at 
which time prices in this industry 
could not exceed those in effect at 
the end of Phase II or such earlier 
date as the Council might conclude 
would be reasonable and appropri- 
ate. 

"Under such an approach, during 
this transition period those lumber 
producers who have paid high 
prices for logs would have an op- 
portunity to turn them into lumber 
and receive their historical markup. 
Likewise, those who have their own 
log supply and those who have cold- 
deck logs would continue to enjoy 
their present situation during this 
period. Under such a proposition 
maybe a few who overspeculated 
might get hurt, but that is the risk 
of the game they play. It is our 
conclusion that, under such circum- 
stances, lumber production would 
significantly increase, and therefore, 
lumber supply would increase sig- 
nificantly immediately and reason- 
able, stable prices would return to 
this industry." 

The Brotherhood called attention 
to its threefold concern with the 
current lumber situation: 1. the in- 
terest of members working in the 
limiber-producing industry, 2. the 
interest of members employed in 
construction, and 3. the interest of 
all members as consumers. 

It told the Council: "The current 
shortage of logs has brought about 
the closing of some lumber-produc- 
ing operations and reduced work 
forces in others. Some mills predict 
that they will not be able to work 
through the year unless more logs 
become available. This has brought 
about an unemployment situation 
which is intolerable at a time when 
lumber is so desperately needed." ■ 



Don Danielsoii, assistant to the General President, 
delivers Brotherhood position statement to COL 
Council. 




s 



THE CARPENTER 




The General Officers with President Emeritus Hutcheson at the recent unveiling ceremonies. From left, they include: Second 
General Vice President William Konyha, First General Vice President Herbert C. Skinner, General President William Sidell, 
General President Emeritus Hutcheson, General Treasurer Charles E. Nichols, and General Secretary R. E. Livingston. 



Hutcheson Plaque Unveiled in Headquarters Ceremony 



■ A fifth plaque now graces the 
white marble walls of the entrance 
lobby at Brotherhood Headquarters 
in Washington, D.C. It was dedi- 
cated April 19 in a brief but heart- 
warming ceremony ... 

"In tribute to Maurice A. Hutch- 
eson, General President, United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America," in recognition 
of his 20 years of service as top 
officer of the Brotherhood. 

It was prepared and erected by 
the General Officers, councils, and 
local unions and is a fitting addi- 
tion to the growing "hall of fame" 
in the Brotherhood's entrance lob- 
by. 



General President William Sidell 
headed the group of Brotherhood 
officials and visitors at the cere- 
mony. He expressed the Brother- 
hood's pride in adding the com- 
memorative bronze plaque to the 
Brotherhood's array of tributes to 
past leaders. He told assembled 
representatives and officers that 
General President Emeritus Hutch- 
eson was probably more moved by 
this simple tribute than by any of 
many tributes paid to him since his 
retirement, last year. 

He gave a brief summary of 
Hutcheson's long service to the 
Brotherhood, extending back to 
1914, when he became an appren- 



tice in the carpentry craft at age 17. 

The General President Emeritus 
was visibly touched by the tribute. 
He thanked the General Officers, 
the councils, and all of the local 
unions and expressed confidence in 
the future of the Brotherhood under 
its new leadership. 

Other plaques on the walls of 
the Brotherhood Headquarters lob- 
by pay tribute to Peter J. McGuire, 
a founder of the Brotherhood; Ga- 
briel Edmonston, the first general 
president; William L. Hutcheson, 
father of the honoree and general 
president from 1915 to 1951; and 
Frank Dufl'y, general secretary from 
1901 to 1948. ■ 



MAY, 1973 




Round Smootli Shank 



Square Topered Shank 

Hotdened NalK 



Hardened Nails 

Can Be 

Hazardous 




ABOVE: The uonienclalure for 
the ball pein hammer. This is 
the proper tool to use with most 
hardened nails. BELOW: The 
hand-drilling hammer is a use- 
ful substitute for driving hard- 
ened nails. 





■ Driving hardened steel-cut and 
masonry nails into concrete can be 
very hazardous, as many amateur 
and professional mechanics will at- 
test. These nails shatter under the 
force of an indirect or glancing 
blow. 

There arc many cases on record 
of eye and other bodily injury 
caused by the flying portion whose 
impact can be likened to that of 
a shrapnel fragment. And the dan- 
ger is not restricted to the user, but 
also to other workmen in the im- 
mediate vicinity. A prominent man- 
ufacturer of these nails warns 
against their improper usage in his 
catalog. 

The first and foremost rule is 
Always Wear Safety Goggles. A 
"hard" hat or equivalent head pro- 
tection is highly recommended. Fly- 
ing pieces of these nails have been 
known to penetrate heavy clothing 
and inflict chest wounds, so even 
more than eye protection should be 
provided. 

Never use a nail hammer to drive 
concrete or masonry nails since 
they are hardened. Nail hammers 
are designed for driving common 
and finishing nails which are rela- 
tively soft. When struck against 



hard metal objects, the face of a 
nail hammer may chip and possibly 
result not only in damage to the 
hammer, but also in eye or other 
bodily injury. A heavy ball pein 
hammer with a large striking face 
or a hand drilling hammer is the 
proper tool to use when driving 
hardened nails. 

When applying furring strips to a 
concrete or masonry wall it is well to 
use an adhesive made for this pur- 
pose. Fewer nails are needed since 
their function then is mainly to 
hold the strips in place until the 
adhesive sets. When not driving 
hardened nails through a piece of 
wood, a hole should be started with 
a small star drill or masonry bit. 

If you have a project involving 
a lot of hardened nail use, it might 
be well to investigate some of the 
new devices now on the market 
which shield the nail during appli- 
cation. ■ 

A very comprehensive booklet, "Proper 
Uses and Common Abuses of Striking 
arid Struck Tools," containing a wealth 
of information for both the amateur 
and professional mechanic, may be ob- 
tained by writing to Service Tools Insti- 
tute, 331 Madison Avenue, New York, 
N.Y. 10017. Include twenty-five cents 
to cover postage and handling. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



Early Carpenters Created 







The "flying horse," 
which moved up 
and down on a 
big brass pole was 
most popular. 



The king of beasts 
was second in 
popularity among 
early carvers of 
carousels. 



A strutting rooster 
has all the color 
and vigor of the 
craftsman's skill 
in his prance. 



Another example 
of the traditional 
merry-go-round 
horse displays an 
ornate saddle and 
trappings. 



BY LYNN MORRISON 

■ Old-time merry-go-rounds are 
fascinating examples of the wood 
carver's craft . . . and, it turns out, 
the finest examples of all were made 
right here in America. 

Most American carousel makers 
immigrated to America at an early 
age. Except for Gustav Dentzel, 
who worked in Germany, and M. 
C. lUions, a Russian who began his 
career carving circus wagons in 
England, the greatest carvers per- 
fected their skills in America. 

The craft first began in the United 
States around the 1850's. To pass 
the long winter months, a carpenter 
might make a simple merry-go- 
round, frame with crude "flying 
horses" designed to swing out as it 
turned. In the spring, he'd try out 
the finished product at home, "work 
out the bugs," then take it to a fair 
in the summer. 

Usually, he would manage to 
make some extra money with his 
carousel. The ride was powered 
by a horse or young boys in ex- 
change for a free ride. EventuaOy 
merry-go-rounds were powered by 
Continued on page 39 

A modern-day union Carpenter at Six 
Flags over Mid-America, St. Louis, Mo., 
applies his skill to a carousel horse. 





A native Irishman, O'Sullivan enjoyed a St. 
Patrick's Day visit with David Ben Gurion, 
the 87-year-old founder of the State of Israel. Ben 
Gurion had been a friend and admirer of the 
late prime minister of Ireland, Eamon DeVelera, 
and the two men discussed the future of Ireland 
and the Gaelic and Hebrew tongues in an 
animated discussion on the shores of the Sea of 
Galilee. 



ISRAEL BUILDS FOR THE FUTURE 
WITH VERSATILE UNION CRAFTSMEN 



Bay Area Irishman Gives His Impressions 
Of Construction Work in the Jewish State 



■ In the State of Israel a union 
carpenter is not only a carpenter, 
he's also a painter, electrician and, 
from time to time, almost any other 
skilled craftsman of the building 
trades. A II construction labor works 
out of one organization, and an ap- 
prentice is trained to move into 
almost any area of the building 
trades. 

It's up to the Israeli employer to 
furnish the hand tools to these ver- 
satile craftsmen, however. 

No coveralls are worn by union 
labor in Israel. An old pair of 
trousers and shirt is considered 
suitable wearing apparel. 

These are some of the impres- 
sions noted by Joseph O'Sullivan, 
business representative of Carpen- 
ters Local 22 and president of the 
San Francisco Building Trades 
Council, during a visit to Israel in 
March. 0"Sullivan was an official 
guest of the Israel Bond Organiza- 
tion, along with 10 other trade 
union officials, in recognition of his 
long support of fund-raising pro- 
grams for the Middle East nation. 

"Piecework is encouraged in Is- 
rael," O'Sullivan points out, "while 
we in the United States see such 
work as a speed-up system. 

"Difference in climate, customs 
and economics cause other building 
material to be used. Drywall or 



sheetrock is not found in home con- 
struction. Partitions in both com- 
mercial and residential building are 
made from cement block and plas- 
ter applied after construction. One 
of the reasons, I am told, is that 
the wood for frames is too expensive. 
All wood is imported to the country 
against payment in dollars or other 
hard currency. 

"By and large, Israelis do not use 
much wood work. I have seen a 
lot of aluminum sash in buildings, 
and I am told that aluminum is 
being used more and more. The 
Israelis manufacture their own win- 
dow glass. They also have all the 
material they need to produce ce- 
ment, but they can't make enough 
to keep up with the demand and 
import some as well. 

"We found all of the people here 
quite friendly and hospitable, and 
especially the government and union 
officials we have met. Of course, 
this is a country run by labor and 
the whole atmosphere here is af- 
fected by that fact. There is plenty 
of legislation to re-inforce that feel- 
ing too. with a minimum wage law, 
social legislation, and all of the kind 
of labor protection which we in the 
U.S. had to struggle for so many 
years to put onto the books. Here, 
they started off with most of it, 
because the 'founding fathers' were 
trade unionists." ■ 




The bent nail award was presented 
recently to O'Sullivan, by William A. 
Bennett, president of Carpenters Local 
1507, El Monte, California. Local 1507 
has been making the award annually 
since 1963 to some California carpenter 
in recognition of his contribution to 
his fellow man. Its piu^iose is to 
stimulate ability, good fellowship, and 
leadership. 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



Chevy Pickups. 
The camper tamers 




New 3/4- and 1-ton Fleetside pickups engineered with campers 
in mind. With new Load Control rear leaf springs and a longer 
wheelbase for improved ride and handling. A roomier cab with 
extensive insulation to help seal out sound. Standard power 




Our new "Big Dooley" features dual 
rear wheels undera full-sized Fleetside 
box. The track is wider for improved 
stability and carrying capacity. 



Chevrolet 



New 4-door 6-passenger pickup gives 
you room for the whole family up front. 
Plus a king-sized camper on the full- 
sized Fleetside box in the rear. 



front disc brakes. 454-cu.-in. V8 available. Four-wheel-drive 
models feature low entry height, high ground clearance. Deluxe 
Camper Special package available includes stabilizer bars and 
a new Elimipitch system to help reduce camper body surge. 



Please enclose 50fi in coin (to cover mailing and 
handling) for each copy of Chevrolet's Recreational 
Vehicle Buyer's Guide ordered. 



Name 

Address 

City State Zip 

Mail to: Recreational Vehicle Buyer's Guide 
P.O. Box 7271 

Detroit, Michigan 48202 TU2S3 
I J 

1973 Chevrolet Recreational Vehicle Buyer's 
Guide. 84 pages, most in full color. A beginner's 
guide to Chevrolet trailering vehicles, pickup 
campers and motor homes. An expert's handbook 
of specifications and recommendations. 



Building a better way to see the U.S.A. 



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CRAFTSMAN Book company of America 



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ANADIAN 
' n^ REPORT 

Where Does Most of Your Money Go? 
For High-Priced Food? Or Housing? 



What takes the biggest cut out of 
an average family's budget — food or 
housing? 

By the outcry being heard right 
across the country this year, every- 
body is riled about the fast-rising cost 
of food. 

But food takes about 20% out of 
the average family's earnings, assum- 
ing there is one breadwinner earning 
the average wage of $150 for a 40- 
hour week, while a home — average 
lot, six rooms with three bedrooms — • 
would cost over 40% of this family's 
income if bought at today's prices. 

Food prices are rising but a family 
of four can have nutritionally-good 
meals on about $30 a week or $125 a 
month, say. 

But if this family has to rent a two- 
bedroom apartment, the rent would be 
about $250 a month in Metro Toronto 
(where 10% of Canada's population 
resides) and the carrying charges on a 
3-bedroom home, to quote the presi- 
dent of the Toronto Real Estate Board 
William Allan, "are more than $300 
a month". $300 a month is two weeks' 
wages — about twice as much as a 
family should spend on accommoda- 
tion. 

The housing market in this area, 
closely followed by other cities like 
Ottawa and Vancouver, is going crazy. 
Allan says that in two years time, 
Metro housing prices — • already the 
highest in North America — could in- 
crease by another $10,000 within two 
years, pushing a new, single-detached 
house up to $55,000. 

Two main factors account for these 
ridiculous prices — high land costs and 
high interest rates. 

There's a battle going on about 
land costs. The big developers and 
others holding substantial blocks of 
land, argue that if the provincial gov- 
ernment would only service the land 
— put in water mains and sewers — fast 



enough and on a wide scale, the avail- 
able supply would keep or force prices 
down. 

Governments and others who are 
supposed to look after the public in- 
terest can't argue the point that more 
serviced land is needed, but they con- 
tend that servicing land already owned 
by real estate operators, speculators 
and developers would without ques- 
tion yield them a bonanza, but there 
would be serious question about it 
lowering land costs. 

What's the answer then? Beat the 
speculators at their own game — buy 
up huge areas of land with public 
funds, service it as usual with public 
funds and keep the land in the public 
domain. 

For housing purposes, rent this pub- 
lic land on a long term basis to build- 
ers in the normal way with the proviso 
that the homebuyer will not be 
gouged. When the term is up, the land 
reverts to the government. 

Or alternatively, do what the On- 
tario government has been doing for 
the last two or three years, lease the 
land for five years directly to the 
homebuyer at a monthly rental and 
after the five year period, the home- 
buyer can have the option of buying 
or continue paying rental. 

The federal government is prepared 
to invest hundreds of millions of dol- 
lars in the next five years to help 
provincial governments to buy up land 
on a large scale. It will be interesting 
to see what comes of it. 

As for interest rates, the government 
is making mortgage loans available to 
lower income families at 7% %, about 
one to 1 Vi % below the going rate. 
But even this is too high by at least 
3%. 

But people seem to be worrying 
more about food costs. Why? Because 
most people have homes, they're pay- 
ing them off slowly but regularly and 



there is nothing they can do about 
this — it's a fixed charge. 

Food, however, is bought every 
week or twice a week and the prices 
move up visibly. You can SEE them 
moving up. 

Housing Revolt 
Predicted by Ross 

A prominent writer in The Toronto 
Star, Alexander Ross, thinks that peo- 
ple are getting up in arms about hous- 
ing costs. In a long column about in- 
flated prices, he said, "I don't think 
the time is too far distant when we're 
going to see some kind of rebellion in 
Toronto . . . Peaceful tactics aimed at 
forcing three levels of government and 
the people who supply our housing 
to sit down and reform the infinitely 
complex system so that decent accom- 
modations can be delivered at a rea- 
sonable price." 

Maybe he's right. This peaceful, 
usually conservative city kicked out 
half a city council last year because 
its elected members gave all the ap- 
pearances of playing footsie with de- 
velopers. Other cities are following 
this lead. 

Federal Warranty 
For Housing Pushed 

The federal government is going to 
introduce a system of warranties to 
assure a homebuyer that a home will 
be liveable when he buys it. 

Urban Affairs Minister is thinking 
that a homebuyer should get at least 
as much protection when buying hous- 
ing as he does when he buys items 
much less costly like a stove, washing 
machine or a car. 

Provinces Eye BC 
Public Works Act 

It will be interesting to see how 
other provinces react to the legislation 
passed by the NDP government in 
British Columbia making it manda- 
tory for contractors to employ union 
labor on public works projects. 

This stiplation is included in the 
new Public Works Employment Act 
which also makes directors and offi- 
cers of a corporation liable for its 
employees' unpaid wages, even if the 
corporation declares bankruptcy. 

Regarding provincial public works, 
the new Act requires "as a condition 
of awarding government contracts 



MAY, 1973 



15 



that a collective agreement must be 
in existence." 

When charged with discriminating 
against non-union firms. Labor Minis- 
ter Kink countered that the legisla- 
tion removes discrimination. 

"On the one hand now, you have 
companies bidding against competi- 
tors who are not required to pay a 
union wage. So this removes that 
discrimination and puts them all on 
an equal basis to compete." 

High Withdrawals 
From Jobless Funds 

Last year's high unemployment 
levels coupled with increased rates 
of unemployment benefit payments 
produced record high expenditures out 
of the unemployment insurance fund. 

This made the federal government 
and the ministers responsible sitting 
ducks for attacks from opposition poli- 
ticians, especially the Conservatives, 
and from business interests against 
extravagant benefits, mollycoddling of 
the unemployed and of payment of 
unwarranted claims out of the fund. 

The Unemployment Insurance Com- 
mission started to tighten up its pro- 
cedures and to crack down on claim- 
ants. It put special investigators on 
the trail of claimants especially in 
Ontario and Quebec. 

Before long newspaper headlines 
blared that out of 63,000 claimants 
investigated, about two thirds had 
their benefits cut off. The public ob- 
viously thought the criticism had been 
justified. 

However claimants have the right 
to appeal before Boards of Referees 
on which the labor movement has 
representation. The union members 
of these boards started comoaring 
notes and found that a large number 
of the claimants had been disqualified 
without just cause. They had their 
benefits restored. 

Armed with this infomiation. Jean 
Beaudry. Executive Vice-President of 
the Canadian Labor Congress, lashed 
out at the UIC's investigating officers 
as "goon squads" and set the Congress 
off on an investigation of its own. 

At the same time the Ontario Fed- 
eration of Labor held a closed door 
meeting with officials of the UJ. Com- 
mission and received assurances that 
the witch-hunt, as the OFL labeled it, 
would stop. 

Certainly some claimants have 
drawn benefits they were not entitled 
to, but the problem of record expendi- 
tures on U.L benefits is unemploy- 
ment and not a few miscreants. 




Omc 'SrAMU/lTz 



"Now you can see why good union 
officials must be rather thick- 
skinned!" 



Union-Industry Show 
Planned for Edmonton 

Canada's third Union-Industries 
Show — an exhibition where everything 
is free: parking, admission, varied 
exhibits, gifts and prizes, films and 
stage shows — will be held in Edmon- 
ton this fall. Donald MacDonald, 
president of the Canadian Labour 
Congress, has announced. 

The show is sponsored by the CLC 
Union Label Trades Department to 
acquaint Canadians with the great 
range of quality goods produced by 
union members and progressive em- 
ployers working together. Mr. Mac- 
Donald explained. It will be held 
October 5-9 at Edmonton's Exhibition 
Grounds. 

This will be the first time the show 
will be held in the West. Previous 
shows were held in Kitchener. Ont. in 
1970. and London. Ont, in 1971. 

Arbitration Ends 
Elevator Strike 

The elevator strike which held up 
about $800 million in construction 
across Canada ended in a rather pecu- 
liar but decisive way. 

First, the Quebec government or- 
dered the union membership back to 
work — a not unusual dictatorial de- 
cree in that province. 

Second, the British Columbia courts 
ruled that the strike was illegal as it 
did not conform to that province's 
industrial relations legislation. 

The strike had been going on 



against five companies for about six 
months by that time. 

Third, the Ontario government 
pushed through legislation which im- 
posed compulsory arbitration on the 
two parties. The union, which had 
already declared itself ready to ac- 
cept voluntary arbitration, (the com- 
panies refused) urged its membership 
back to work. 

The trade union movement abhors 
compulsory arbitration, but it is diffi- 
cult to see what else could have 
achieved any kind of rational settle- 
ment. This was the first time that 
compulsory arbitration was imposed 
in the private sector in Ontario. 

The arbitrator will have to have 
the wisdom of the proverbial Solomon. 
The companies demand full manage- 
ment rights, including more pre-fabri- 
cation of elevators. The union wants 
more job security. 

At this writing the union members 
are back at work across Canada, hav- 
ing impressed the public just how 
essential they are. People who walked 
up 75 steps because subway elevators 
weren't running appreciated the return 
to work. 

About Half Canadians 
Over 65 Are Poor 

A new report on poverty doesn't 
make any better reading than previous 
ones. 

This one, which appeared in Cana- 
dian Welfare magazine, estimated that 
about half of Canadians over the age 
of 65 live in poverty, even if they are 
still working. 

Compulsor>' retirement at age 65 
is nothing but a "'mass firing tech- 
nique" which employers use as a 
socially acceptable way of "pushing 
old workers into retirement." 

Employers also use the old age pen- 
sion as an excuse to pay lower wages 
■"knowing that the difference — up to 
a limit — will be covered by the gov- 
ernment". 

The report added that, to some ex- 
tent, larger guaranteed payments to 
the aged may also be subsidizing em- 
ployers. 

The NDP government in British 
Columbia is now guaranteeing all citi- 
zens over the age of 65 a minimum 
of S200 a month. This gives a couple 
a guarantee of $400 a month which 
should provide them with an ade- 
quate minimum standard of living. 

The federal government is com- 
mitted to increasing the present old 
age pension plan. It may find it diffi- 
cult to aim below the NDP figure in 
B.C. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 




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A gallery of pictures showing some of the senior members of the 
Brotherhood who recently received 25-year or 50-year service pins. 




TORONTO, ONT. 

Meiuhers of Local 27 received 
25-year pins at a dinner and dance 
/lasted by Local 27 at the Town and 
Country Club, Toronto. 

Tlie accompanying photograplis 
sliow most of the members honored. 

Tlie small picture shows Philip 
Robichaud, president of Local 27, 
receiving his pin from Robert Reid, 
recording .secretary. 

Local 27 members receiving 25-year 
pins {not in order of appearance in 
the photographs) include: Donald 
Archer, Melvin Babcock, Leroy Boone, 
Nicliolas Boyko, Natlian Brown, 
Patrick Cavender, William C. Clarke, 
Anthony Coyle, William W. R. 
Davis. Walter Derlago, Harry 




Donson. MicJuiel Durec. ,4ri hic 
Dnsome, Kelly Formun. William 
Frenette, George Gostick. Adrian 
Gravel, Caulbert Harrietha, Herbert 
Homer, Herbert Howell, Kermil 
Hussey. 

Also. Harold Ingliam, Robert G. 



Jewell. Frank Kingsley. Peter 
Kowman, Edgar Landry, Leonel 
Landry, Anthony H. Lavereaii, 
Milton Legresley, Ellis E. Lehto, 
Leslie V. Levin. Alfred McDougalt, 
Donald MacLellan. Paavo Makinen, 
Elijah Menchenlon. Cyril C. Miles. 
Eric Miles, John H. Moran. Leonard 
W. North. Takonari Okada. Robert 
Parsons. Clifford H. Payne, Valdemar 
Pedersen, Sidney L. Pinsent E. S. 
Powell. John B. Randell. 

Also, James Rimmer, Tom Ritchie, 
Philip Robichaud Thomas Rowntree. 
Albert Russell. Naotoshi Saito, 
Moses Smith, Hugli Stewari, Fred 
Svenson, Harvey Thompson, Albert 
Van-Luven, Stewart Warren. Tauno 
L Whitala, Walter Winsor, and 
William Wuori. 




MAY, 1973 



17 




BOSTON, MASS. 

Members of Local 67, Boston, 
Mass., who were presented 25-year 
service pins at a recent buffet: 

Their names (not shown in order 
of appearance in the picture) are: 
Arthur Shrogis; Arvid Leelman; 
James J. Connolly: Gordon L. 
Siteman: John A. Capone: Alexander 
C. Grube: S. Wilfred Cameron: 
Frank J. Fiorello: James A. 
McCormack: Stanley Ravinski: John 
Arsenault: Charles Kilroy: William 
Lombard; Peter Van Gemert; John 
Janson; Frank P. Melanson; Loreto 
Visco; Earl J. Barnett: Geramiah 
Conway; Mildon R. Cleland Jacob 
Freeman; John Cameron: Gerard 
Hockey: Robert W . Dancer: Bernard 
L. D'Entremont; Paul Fiorello: 
Matthew P. Constantino: Carl G. 
Dahl; Louis Bidorini: Fred Pegiiri; 
Charles Bevilequa: Peter Foti: Adam 
P. Rossetti; John Micalizzi: Joseph 
M. Concannon; Horace B. Rafiise: 
Angus B. MacAskill; Fred E. Goss; 
Arthur J. Sacco: Edward McCuslier: 
Peter Zubel: William A. Sellon; 
Andrew Dancer. Jr.: Raymond 
Murano; Harold V. Kilroy; Knut E. 

E. Gustafson; John J. Reid; Sydney 
L. Kent; Raymond E. Shaw; Edmund 

F. Ward; Elmer R. Graves: Cano 
Terranova; Paul J. Brennaii; Joseph 
B. Blum. Jr.; Michael J. McGrath: 
Joseph Pedranli; Edward Galvin; 
Leo G. Rooney; John A. Salvin; 
Alexander Breda: Austin Larrahee; 
Clifton E. Curry: Wilfred O. 
Robinson; Walter S. Beard; Robert 
P. Labbe; Fredrick Anderson: Francis 
J. Keefe; lister G. Bell; Jerry 
Darrigo: Augustus Fletcher: Robert 

J. McGillicuddy; Thomas D. Landry; 
Basil Salvin; James Murray; Arthur 
Bechett. 

Not present but also awarded pins 
were: George Doyle; Warren J. 
Ryan; Theodore LeBlanc; Fred T. 
Howell: John B. McKinnon: Leo R. 
Bilodeao; Sydney T. Ollerhead; 



Francis S. Moore; Joseph Adario; 
Harold Gardner; Alexander B. 
Strachan; Cammillias Capadanno; 
John H. Laguff, Jr.; Arthur C. Mass; 
Vincent N. Marchese; Alfred 
Liberman; Theodore T. Trott, Sr.; 
Joseph Sullivan; Robert A. Sears; 
William D. McKinnon: Ernest W. 
Detiman: Charles R. Harris: John 
J. Scanlon: John C. Morrison. Jr.; 
Herbert W. James: Frank Bottari; 
Vinal L. Durcho; William Hauley; 
Eric Carlson; Jatnes H. Brown; 
James Lombard: Olof K. Wester; 
Guiseppi Arena; Charles H. Wetmore, 
Jr.: John Klimas; Harold E. Young: 
Aaron Bregman; William R. Doyle; 
Frank McCallum: Patrick J. O'Leary; 
Paul H. Collins; John C. Drazan; 
Harry Whitney; Marat E. Santini; 
William Woodfield: Angus 
McDonald: Fred J. Findler: .Albert 
J. Kuicala: Charles S. Brooks: Cotter 
B. McKenzie: Donald A. Sutherland; 
Fred A. Wentzell; Carl A. Carlson; 
Clayton C. Sewell; John H. Carlson; 
Stanley McCoombs: Andria Parise; 
John H. Bradley; Joseph Carlson: 
Louis M. Carrara; Harry Babener; 
Felix A. Pottier; William J. Kerrins; 
Hector J. Osmond; Ronald J. 
McGillivary! Donald MacEarchern; 
James McKinnon: John A. 
Campanella; Martin J. Collins: 
Albert A. LaBreque: Karl A. 
Poison: Alphonsus L. Salvin: John 

D. MacKinnon: Phillip Spillane: 
Charles H. King; Emerson A. 
MacKenzie; Harold Vincent: William 
Hull: John E. Bergquist: Peter 
Santos: Joseph Wallace: John E. 
Findler: Joseph Kimtis Gunnar 
Carlson: Joseph L. Saulmier; Jack 
Tucker: Harold Foster: Harry E. 
Pearson: Frank Bregani Philip 
LaPenta: Thomas Curran: Francis A. 
Donnellan, Jr.; Charles Paltsios; 
Plemin C. Gellette: John D. Kennedy; 
Gactano DeNatale: Coleman J. 
Connolly, A ley McNeil: William 

E. Onley, Sr.; Robert W. Huber; 
John Dodeck; Herbert L. Dyer; 
Justine D'Entrement: Tore B. Wallin; 
Donald J. Cewar; Joseph P. 
Theriault: Raymond A. Schmoker; 
Frederick G. Durepo: Walter R. 
Hcarn; Anihonv R. Marino; John 



Johnson; Manual P. Vargas: Ralph 
Knell; Charles W. Turner; Bliss C. 
Johnson; Otis L. Chamberlain: Ely 
Silver; Francis X. O'Meara; Joseph 
Darone; Thomas F. Tierney: Ben A. 
Solari, Jr.; Herbert W. Rood; Douglas 
W. Burns; John A. Gillis: Linwood 
Latimer; George V. Douse; Michael 
J. Walsh; George C. Marragia; 
Waller L. Carlson: Hormisdas 
Darcey; Rudolph Sissa: Ernest Jones; 
Michael A. Thibault; Lester 
MacMunn; Michael J. Noone; 
Edward Mulcahy; Ivon Carpenter, 
Jr.; Arthur Donovan; Anthony 
Paglucca; Emerson R. Brooks: John 
M. O'Malley; Allan R. Grant; Joe 
E. Tarbox; Eric Pearson: Wallace R. 
Ross; Fred S. Risser; Sture Tilly; 
Dennis O. O'Connell; Patrick 
Connaughton; Russell A. Gambing; 
Louis Cantori; Edward B. McVergh; 
John Saeldner; Jacob Kapostiti; 
William W. Perkins; Raymond W. 
Bellville; Fred J. Massarelli; William 
Mattie; Robert Johnson; Kenneth S. 
Welsh; John McNeil; Arthur A/. 
Boudreau: Franklin S. A Ives; Gordon 
S. Strouold; Warren F. Blum: John E. 
Chisolm; John W. Fredlund: Saniual 
Albaro; Joseph DiCampli; Eli L. 
Gaumont; Alfred Hachey, Jr.: 
Charles A. MacMasters; Ralph B. 
Moore; Harold B. Lavasseur: Edward 
Petrosius; Walter Marley: Eric A. 
Carlson; John J. McCarthy. 




Local 67 Business Agent John 
McSharry presents a 25-year pin to 
Fred Peguri as President Matthew 
O'Connor offers his congratulations. 



18 



THE CARPENTER 




TONAWANDA, N.Y. 

Members of Millwritiht Local 1577 Mi'th 25 years or more 
membership in the United Brotlicrhood M-erc honored with 

a pin presentation last year. 

Herman F. Bodewes, president of the Biifjalo District 

Council, presented 50-year pins to Fred Drews and his 

father, Herman J. Bodewes, business representative. 

Business Representative Bodewes, his son, Herman F. 

Bodewes, and grandson, Terry Bodewes, recording secretary. 

Local 374, have a total of 100 active years of membersliip in 

the United Brotherhood. 

Shown in tlie picture, seated, left to right are Peter Smietana, 

Alfred Frost, Philip Castiglia, Thonuis Aiigello, Ferdinand 



Schmidt. John Miller. Santo Marciano, Frank Trinca, 

Casimer Abbott, and Norman Rohloff. 

Second row: Joseph Fustino. Nicholas Palernosiro, 

Fred Drews, Herman Bodewes, Michael Minotii, Kenneth 

Squelch, Anthony La Machia, Norman Fisher. Carmello 

Pagano, and Peter Brown. 

Standing, left to right, Harold Scheg. Andrew Lochte, 

John Bryniarski, Frank O'Connor, Joseph Bryniarski. John 

Kent, Conrad Bochenski, William Whitlam, Bernard Boll, 

Nick Menchetti, Arthur Peterson, Lyon Stark, Harold 

Simoneit. Raymond Hemzler, Edward Gajewski, Richard 

Tillatson, Nelson Wheaton, Charles Wild, Raymond Swain, 

and Robert Moller. 




HUNTINGTON, N.Y. 

Local 1292 presented pins at its Januaiy. 1973 meeting. 

In the smaller picture, right, front row left to right, are 
Anton Nilscn, Alfred Swenson, Raymond Moffatt, and Richard 
Kiimp. Back row, Donald Robhins, Bernard Comeau, Bernard 
Fuchs, Business Agent John Cocker, President Fred Brandt. 

In the picture above, front row, left to right, are Paid 
Flinkstrom, John Brozyna, Ed Dombeck, Peter Lopez, Hugh 
Witze. Ed Kiider, recording secretary, Santa Caravetto. 

Middle row, Bernard Fuck, business agent; Veikko Ranta, 
Oswald Tjersland, Mathew Wienckowski, Harold Jacohsen. 
Wm. Augustin, Albert Kselman, Leo Samson, Geo. Muchel, 
and W. Worontsof}. 

Back row, Harvey Diehl, Geo. Gurdock. Carl Peterson, 
Frank Baler, Henry Augustin, Fred Barrett, Jolm Lamke, 
Victor Crepeau, and Arthur Schryvcr. 




n ?r 




MAY, 1973 



19 



IRVINGTON, N.J. 

Local 161 S recently presented 25- 
cind 50-year pins to its deserving 
members. Cesare Polimeni. president 
of the local, himself a recipient of 
a 50-year pin, officiated and 
congratulated eacli receipient. A 
buffet dinner followed, and dinner 
music was supplied by a four- 
piece rock combo group. 

In the picture at upper left, are 
these 25-year-pin recipients: 

Front row, seated, left to right, 
Angela Benenati. Edmund Venditti, 
Louis Ritucco, Nicholas Bellomo, 
Anthony Costa, and Vincent Ciccone. 

Standing, left to right: Joseph 
Poliicki, John Fitzsimmons. George 
Timpanaro, Pres. Cesare Polimeni, 
Anthony Quagliato, Dominick 
Desimone, and Joseph Polimeni. 

In the picture at upper right are 
more 25-year-pin recipients, as 
follows: 

Seated, left to right, Dominick 
Scordo, Jr., Angela De Palma, 
Joseph Angelo, Michael Perugino, 
Edward De Munna. Sr., and Max 
Greifer (50-Year Pint. 

Standing, left to right, Vita 
Russomanno, Rudolph Rnssomanno, 
Ale.x Zaccone, Aurelio Salerno, 
Pres. Cesare Polimeni, Dante Del 
Maestro, Rudolph D'Agostino, and 
Louis Donato. 

The 50-year-pin recipients are 
shown in the small picture below. 

Standing, Louis Politano, Cesare 
Polimeni, and Rocco Branca. 

Seated, left to right, Vincent 
Baglivo, Frank De Leonardis, and 
Lotus Centanni. 




CHICAGO, ILL. 

JoIdi Lc'kner. center, received his 
65-year pin in Lakeland, Fla., last 
year, on his 67th anniversary of mem- 
bership in Local 242, Chicago, III. He 
served as treasurer before retiring 
in 1955 and was replaced by Frank 
Deckelman right now living in 
Cape Coral, Fla., also retired. The 
presentation was made by Edward 
Sienko, business representative of 
Local 242. 





SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 

Lumber and Sawmill Workers Local 3170 recently presented 20-year and 
25-year service pins. Presenting the awards was International Representative 
Clarence Briggs. 

Twenty-five-year pin awards went to the members shown above, left to 
right: Leonard Capps, Chester Kiles, Tony Laurenzi, Cesareo Unzveta, 
Raymond Bettanini, Robert Carey, Marian Fogleman, George Escobar, Phil 
De Vita, and Mario Ceccarrelli. 

Twenty-year pin awards, in the picture below, left to right: Irwin Thomason, 
Bonnie Krantz Hampton, Ernest Olsen, Grady McKinzie, Eulalio Garcia, 
Joseph Montero, and Louise Adams. 




20 



THE CARPENTER 




OCALA, FLA. 

Members of Local 2292 received 
service pins recently. 

The first picture sho\vs Harold 
Lewis, Fourth District General 
Executive Board Member, pinning 
a 55-year pin on William Roberts. 

The picture at the bottom of 
the page shows the men and officers 
of Local 2292 who attended the 
banquet. They are as follow: 

Seated, left to right: Harry Wholf, 
W. C. Hamilton, Chester Cooper. 
Andy Taylor, O. C. Spicer, William 
Roberts, Elmo Busby, Lee Bre^eding, 
William Wilcox, Paul Jones. 

Standing, left to right: R. C. 
Strickland, treasurer: Ken Carter, 
warden: M. C. Swindell, conductor; 
R. W. Strickland, president: Harold 
Lewis, Fourth Board Member: 
James Byrd. trustee: Gordon L. 
Malmber, business agent and 
financial secretary: Kenneth Pittman. 

The list of men receiving pins 
from Local 2292 includes: 
TWENTY-YEAR PINS— Charles 
Arnold, David Bauer, Lee Breeding, 
George Cliastain, Chester Cooper, 
Wilbur Dailey, Theodore Green, 
Brooks Hays, Ellis Hutchinson, Ira 
Jones, George Kussmaid, Linton 
Moore, James Preston. Ralph 
Reynolds, Andrew Taylor, Casper 
Wells, Harry Wholf, Melvin Wright, 
Julius Niietzi. 

TWENTY-FIVE YEAR PINS: 
William Memmer, James Sinclair, 
Ted Sheiro, Carl Spicer. 

THIRTY-YEAR PINS: Elmo 
Busby, Glenn Easley, J. L. Gnagy, 
W. C. Hamilton, Karl Klemm, 
Morgan Clemmie. 

THRITY-FIVE YEAR PINS: R. 
C. McDaniel. 

FIFTY-FIVE YEAR PINS: 
Wiliam Roberts. 



CLINTON, lA. 

Local 772 presented 40 25-year 
pins last year. Most of the honorees 
are shown in the picture below. 

A 50-year pin was received by 
Gordon Piatt for his father, Chester 
Piatt, who was in the hospital at 
the time of the presentation, as 
shown in the picture at right. It 
was presented by District Council 
President Eugene Robello and 
Local Union President William Rowe. 




WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. 

Local 53 recently held a special 
dinner at the White Plains Hotel to 
honor veteran members. 

Honored guests included members 
with from 50 to 63 years of 
service and two past presidents. 
They were presented pins by General 
Executive Board Member Patrick 
J. Campbell. In the picture, seated 
left to right, Albert Anderson, past 
president; John Green, 50 years; 
Ernest Larson, 52 years: Carl 
Peterson. 50 years: Olaf Knudsen, 
63 years; Manuel Bravo, 54 years. 

Rear, left to right, George Sawler, 
co-chairman; Dominic Popp, 50 
years; GEB Member Patrick J. 



C^k 



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^'■>4 





Campbell: Carl Johnson, past 
president and business representative, 
retired; and James Nicholson, 
business representative, chairman. 

Unable to attend were William 
McFadden, 56 years; Leonard Houle, 
53 years: Louis Gatto, 54 years; 
George Barry, 57 years; and Fred 
Russe, 61 years. 

At left at head table. Guest 
Speaker Peter J. Brennan, since 
appointed Secretary of Labor by 
President Nixon. Also at head table 
next to Mr. Brennan is Executive 
Judge T. J. Sullivan, who at one time 
was the district council attorney. 

More than 400 members and 
friends attended the dinner. 





RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Tlie following Local 642 members received their 25-year 
membership pins: In the top picture, first row. Jack Preece, 
George McAllister, Delbert Howard, Clinton Lindcll, Charles 
Parkhiirst, L. L. Nolan, Vester Robinson, Byron Mitchell. 
Irvin J. Melton. Ben C. Murphy, Norbert Zamzow; second row, 
J. B. Wilson, O. R. Lemire. Howard Stitckey, Sam A. Ward, 
Elmer Reed, V. B. McDonald. Willie Tademy, Aaron Wallace, 
Charlie Leonard; back row, W. H. Hall, Ed Odtradovec, 
T. D. Kelley, E. F. McNeil, Ernest Kriiger, Clarence McNabb, 
Earl Rhodes, Sherman Young, Gordon Pheil. 



In the lower picture, first row, Delbert Howard, Lloyd 
Brown, Earl Green, Dave Dopp, Francis Brower, Gonzalo 
Ceballos. Eddie Bouzidin. E. F. Burton: second row. Gay 
Hamblin. C. E. Blankenship, Columbus Jackson, Matt Jones, 
James Davis, Ed Dossman. Joaquin Alves; back row, William 
Crawford, L. E. Erickson, Harold Johnson, Eulis 
Edwards, Chester Devers. LeRoy Griffith. 

Editor's Note: Identifications generally follow the sequence 
of the numbers placed on the photographs by the financial 
secretary of the local union. 




HOBOKEN, N.J. 

Members of Local 391 recently held a pin presentation 
dinner and dance at Loins Restaurant. Union Ciry. New 
Jersey. 

Honored that night were the following: Front row, left to 
right. Former Business Representative Henry Cook. 50-year 
member: Giloramo Mercadante, 25 years; Fred Schuck, 
25 years; Mrs. Mildred Beck, present business representative's 
wife; Joseph Coppolino, 35 years. 

Back row, left to right, Edward Lipka. 30 years; John 
Tribastone, 25 years; and Edwin Sarti, 25 years. 






'^' lfe' 



.v?--'' 



LORAIN, O. 

Veteran Carpenters, all members of Local 2291 at the 
Lorain yard of the American Ship Bidlding Co., recently 
received pins for long membership. International Representative 
John Cline of Cold Water, Mich., right, presents a 30-year 
pin to Norman K. Becker. Lorain. Others received pins 
and their years of service, from left, are Charles Minnich, 
Lorain, 30; Clyde H. Rosa. Birmingham, 25; Joseph R. 
Horvath, Local 2291 president, 25; Robert Lovell, Lorain, 25. 



11 



THE CARPENTER 



PORTLAND, ME. 

A banquet was held recently to 
honor the 50-year and 25-year 
members of Local 517. Pins were 
presented to the eight 50-year mem- 
bers and the 42 25-year members by 
Leo Cyr, president of the local, and 
John E. Bowman, business agent. 

FIFTY YEAR MEMBERS: Samuel 
L. Blanchard, Leo M. Briggs, 
Norman E. Burgess, Earl E. 
Eldridge, Abraham Nilsen, and 
George L. Simmons. 

TWENTY-FIVE YEAR 
MEMBERS: Andrew Batson, 
Clifford E. Blake. Walter C. Bodman, 
Herman J. Bouchard, John E. 
Bowman, Homer E. Chadhurn. Paul 
E. Champaigne, Thomas J. Comeau, 
Leo J. Cyr, William Davis, Everett 
Dobson, Kenneth A. Dunphe, 
William J. Fallona, Harlan C. Grant, 
Leo A. Green, Carlton Greenleaf, 
Patrick Hachey, Clinton W. Hawkes, 
Richard M. Holmes, Clinton P. 
Hubbard, Magnus C. Jensen, Donald 
Kimball, Joseph W. Lanteigne, 
Carroll M. Lewis, Anthony Leyko, 
Vincent J. Lukas, Channing H. 
Marshall, Henry P. McKenny, Carroll 
M. Miller, Nicholas Morris, Richard 
A. Munroe, Stanley L. Munroe, 
Joseph L. Ouellette, William L. 
Peverada, Joseph P. Pisczak, James 
E. Price, Kenneth V. Raymond, 
Harold E. Rogers, Jr., George 
Schools, James P. Shortill, Hen-old 
S. Staples, Merle W. Steeves. Guy E. 
Theriault, Henry A. Theriault, John 
L. Theriault, Joseph Theriault, Sr., 
Zoel G. Therrien, Roy Thibodeau, 
Joseph M. Thompson, Kenneth 
Vaughan, Carl E. Warren. Charles 
E. Wright, and Michael P. Pistaki. 

"Old Timers" Special Recognition 
— Charles Roux, Sr. and Enos E. 
Johnson with 59V2 years each; 
Joseph Vanier, Jr.. 57 years; and 
Walter Palmer, 56 years. 

LYNBROOK, N.Y. 

The following members of Local 
950, were awarded 25-year pins at 
a meeting held December 15: 
Mike Bar one, Fred Boddy, Bernard 
Brockwehl, Ernest Celli. Fred 
Franz, Gerard Krantz, Niles 
Peterson, Carl Raimondi, Jr.. 
Eugene Reinhardt, George P. 
Schaefer, Raymond Straub, and 
Ernest Verity. 

Tlie picture shows Fred Boddy, 
George P. Schaefer, recording 
secretary, and Ray Straub, 
recipients of pins, and George 
Adler, president, who made the 
presentation. 





OMAHA, NEB. 

The 50-year members of local unions in the Omaha, Neb., District Council 
were honored in joint ceremonies last year. Local unions represented included 
Millwrights Local 1463, Carpenters Local 1606, and Carpenters Local 253. 

Shown above are participants in the ceremonies, left to right, Leon Greene, 
5th District Executive Board Member: Lawrence Holmberg, Local 1606; 
Aage Jorgensen, Local 253; Charles Lewis, Local 253; Ernest Sundberg, 
Local 253; and William Sidell, General President, United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America, AFL-CIO, who was a special guest. 




"W i^gl^^ 



ii..**wCt *■* 



WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Pile Drivers Local 2311 presented service pins to members witli 25 and 
more years of service at its annual picnic last summer. Some of the pin 
recipients are pictured above. Left to right. Jack Smith, Harry Duncan, 
Charles Sliger, William Gallahan, William Ellis, Harry Scanlon, Gus 
Delattre, Harold Mace, Clarence Moulton, William Dempsey, Joseph Brogan, 
president of the local, Ray Booth, and Victor Sykes. 




Ik 

SMITHTOWN, N.Y. 

Local 1167 recently presented 25-year pins to its senior members at a 
special dinner. Those honored are shown in the picture. 

Seated, from left, Joe Carlson, Harold Lindquist, George Babcock, 
general agent. General Representative John Rogers, Albert Demmer, and 
Tom Bonne. 

Standing, Kalle Huhtala, George Greeman, John Johnson, Local President 
Frank Wakefield, and Burdette Glady. 



MAY, 1973 



23 



BELLINGHAM, WASH. 

Local 756 held a special Christinas 
Awards banquet and dance at the 
Leopold Hotel in Bellingham. 

Among the guests in attendance 
n-as Hal Morton, General 
Representative of the Brotherhood. 
Brother Morton M-as the guest 
speaker for the evening and assisted 
in the awards presentations. 

A special award was given lo 
Orvin L. Haggcn in recognition of 
Ids 50 years of membership. Brother 
Haggei! joined the United 
Brotherhood on November 25, 7922. 
He M'as presented witli a gold 
50-year membership pin and a gold 
wrist watch. 

Plaques M-ere presented to Orvin 
L. Haggen. G. Roscoe Hilliard and 
.James T. Crombie for their uuiny 
years of dedicated service. Haggen, 
and Hilliard served for many years 
as business representatives. Crombie 
held the position of president for 
a number of years. 

Members receiving tlieir 25-year 
membership pins ^vere: Floyd Crane, 
Monty Evans, George Hicks. Frank 
Hubbard, Woodrow Icard, Corvin 
C. Johnson, Re.x Jones, Bert Kohlcr. 
Cinlis Lidbcck, William R. Mills, 
Charles Reynolds, Howard Scarlett. 
Clarence V. Seelye and Frank G. 
Stephans. 

In the top picture. Representative 
Hal Morton, right, presents Orvin L. 
Haggen witli a gold watch and a 
50-year membership pin. 

In the second picture, receiving 
special award plaques were, from 



NEW YORK, N.Y. 

The officers and members of Local 
3S5 are shown at their recent buffet 
dinner honoring members receiving . 
their 65, 60, 55, 50, 45 and 40-year 
membership pins. 

Seated, First Row: Sam York, 
Frank Ecsedy, Agostin Vizzini, 
Irving Feinherg. 

Seated. Second Row: Savario 
Accardo, Gaetano Tie in, Vincent 
Koloin, William Ciarletta. 

Standing: Louis Fiore, financial 
.secretary: Frank Leanza. warden: 
Frank Calciano, recording-secretary; 
John Dell'Arnio, trustee; Charles 
Ferrara. conductor: Doininick 
Mandaglio, president; Dominick 
■ Mirenda, vice-presideni: Philip 
Mentesana, trustee: Rudolph 
Evangelista, trustee; Daniel J . 
Evangelista, business representative. 

Those awarded pins who arc not 
shown in the picture include: 65- 
YEAR PINS— Hy man Charney. A. 
Cioffi, Max Finkel, Phil Kahn, Harry 
Levitt, and Nuzzo Clemente. 

60-YEAR PINS— A. Cwrenti, 
Lorenzo Leo, and Anthony Rozvcki. 

55-YEAR PINS— Frank CastelU. 
Guiseppe De Gaetano, Harry Gibson, 




WKm •>'^pR^=''^l»^ 




left to right, G. Roscoe HilUard, 
former business representative; Orvin 
L. Haggen, former business 
representative; and James T. 
Crombie, former president of 
Local 756. 

In the large group are members 
receiving 25 -year membership pins. 



from left to right, front row, Monty 
Evans. Corvin C. Johnson, William 
R. Mills, George Hicks, Re.x Jones 
and Frank G. Stephans. 

Back row, Clarence V. Seelye, 
Floyd Crane, Curtis Lidheck, 
Howard Scarlett, Woodrow hard, 
Bert Kohler, and Charles Reynolds. 




Hyinan Lipshitz, and Anniinziato 
Lofaro. 

50-YEAR PINS—S. Celiberti, G. 
Cuomo, Umberto Di Stefano, S. La 
Russo, D. Lombardi, Aurelio 
Moricone, Zoltan Paroczay, Nicola 
Piccicacco, D. Ragogna, Americo 
Russo, Angelo Serrone, D. A. 



Serrone, Harry Simon, and Giacoino 
Spadolta. 

45-YEAR PINS— Peter Bico, G. B. 
Currenti, Victor De Gaetano, 
Gustave Johnson, and Peter Ragogna. 

40-YEAR PINS—Ale.x Agnoli, 
Joseph Clementi, Armando Forte, 
Dominic Lofaro, and Jerry Medori. 



24 



THE CARPENTER 




LOCAL UNION NEWS 



Mu'^^ mf'im^.^^^^ 




A view of the large crowd attending the testimonial for Carl Reiter 



Large St. Louis Gathering Honors Carl Reiter 



The giant marquee at the Carpenters' 
Hall in St. Louis. Mo., read "Carl Reiter 
Night," Saturday, March 17. and inside 
the giant building nearly 1000 persons 
jammed Halls One, Two and Three and 
the downstairs to pay tribute to the man 
who spent the better part of his life 
serving his union and his community. 

During the hour reserved for testimo- 
nials, speaker after speaker rose to praise 
the recently - retired assistant executive 
secretary-treasurer of the Carpenters" Dis- 
trict Council of Greater St. Louis. AFL- 
CIO and recounted personal recollections 
of Reiter's life . . . episodes which gave 
insight into the man whose friends call 
him "Bull", a nickname utterly incon- 
gruous with the nature of the man him- 
self. 

(The nickname "Bull" was given to 
Reiter early in his life by an uncle. As 
Reiter explained to the guests Saturday 
evening, he was engaged in a conversation 
with an uncle at a family picnic. The 
uncle, apparently unbelieving of every- 
thing the young man was telling him, 
decided that his nephew fit the then pop- 
ular phrase, "Bullmoose Days".) 

At the surprise tribute for 44 years of 
service to his union were not only Reiter"s 
friends within the labor movement but 
also management representatives and 
community leaders who came to know 
him as a man of limitless energy, integ- 
rity and concern for his fellow man. 

It was an evening of nostalgia as 
speaker after speaker rose to recount 
personal recollections of Reiter's contri- 
butions to his fellow union members, 
his family, his community and his pro- 
fession. 

A 12 - page photo - filled tabloid - sized 



brochure, prepared for the occasion and 
placed at each table setting helped guests 
relive significant events of Reiter's life. 
The brochure was replete with 74 dra- 
matic photos of Reiter's life from infancy 
to the time of retirement. They were 
accompanied by a narrative biography of 
the man who rose from a 22-year old 
carpenter's apprentice in 1926 to the 
second highest position in the Carpenter's 
District Council in 1967. Huge blowups 
of other photos marking special events 
in Reiter's life were hung along walls. 

Ollie Langhorsl. chief executive officer 
of the District Council who selected 



Reiter as his assistant in 1967, paid the 
union's highest respect by terming Reiter 
"a man, a leader and a brother unionists." 
He presented Reiter with a citation of 
merit lauding him for his years as a 
member of Local 73 and officer of the 
District Council. Also presented was a 
wallet-sized card to indicate his service 
to the union. Additionally, the District 
Council and Local 73 jointly presented 
Reiter with a magnificent set of com- 
memorative coins encased in plastic and 
framed in walnut. The coins commem- 
orate major events in the history of our 
union. 



CLIC Coininittee and Local Officers 




The local <":ii|>cii(ers Legisla(i>u linpuneinenl t oinniillee and the officers of Local 
839, Des Plains, III., recently assembled for an ofhcial picture. They inchide: Seated, 
left to right, Baimis Poole, treasurer; William Uhler, warden; Everett Osar, trustee; 
Sherman Dautel, business representative and president; Don VanPool, vice president. 
Standing: left to right, Albert Greenenwald, trustee; Curtis Roe, trustee; Richard 
Day, recording secretary; and Edward Dautel, financial secretarj'. Thomas Drager, 
conductor was not present. 



MAY, 1973 



25 



Old Dance Card Recalls 
Carpenters Ball of 1898 



A faded dance card and program, relic 
of a long gone era, is a prized possession 
of Local 1 JO, St. Joseph, Mo., whose 75th 
anniversary was observed Nov. 24, 1972. 

The card was recently found by Mrs. 
Ed J. Walls, of St. Joseph, in an old al- 
bum that had belonged to her mother. It 
is of special interest to Mrs. Walls as her 
father, the late L. N. Miller, helped 
organize Local 110 and was its first presi- 
dent and installing officer. 

According to Mark L. Bagby, a mem- 
ber of Local 110 and a retired interna- 
tional union representative, Mr. Miller 
was a foreman for the J. W. Lehr Con- 
struction Co. when most of the downtown 
area was built. 

The card is treasured by the union as 
a memento of the first annua! ball held 
Saturday, Dec. 3, 1898, by the newly 
organized Local 110 at a hall at Third 



and Felix Streets. 

The ball card lists the names of charter 
members who served on committees. On 
the reception committee were N. V. 
Baker, William C. Hartman, Charles Ken- 
dall and E. W. Mulenioux. The floor 
committee was composed of D. P. Rich, 
L. N. Miller, A. P. Page. E. J. Connelly 
and George Hendrix. Serving on the door 
committee were B. B. Morris, Ole Oleson 
and William Zimmerman. 

A grand march and 20 dances were 
listed on the program. The dances in- 
cluded the waltz, two step, schottische, 
quadrille, ripple, polka, rye waltz, lanciers, 
lacomus and elms, closing with "Home 
Sweet Home." Most of the dances are 
unknown to the present generation. 

The ball probably was the first event 
sponsored by the union, which was char- 
tered Nov. 24, 1897. 







, and Joiners 



oi \mertca 



;; Carpenters'--. ^,,oN NO.no. 






o;.--....s, 




Local 2028 Member 
Also Fui- Trapper 

To supplement his limited income as 
a carpenter, Oscar Nelson of Local 2028, 
Grand Forks, N.Dak., has for the past 
56 years been a fur trapper in the 
sparsely-populated hills of his home state. 

The winter trapping season just ended 
was his most successful year. He sold 
more than 200 fox pelts, 24 mink, 22 
muskrat. 6 beaver, and 8 raccoon. He 
reports that fur prices on most animals 
are at their highest levels. Nelson re- 
ports that he received $25 each for the 
fox pelts. He attributes the high price 
of fur to latest fashions which have made 
long-haired furs popular and to the fact 
that airplane hunting has been made 
illegal, which has decreased the supply 
of pelts. 

Nelson, age 68. estimates that he 
traveled almost 11,000 miles in running 
his trap lines during the two months he 
devoted to trapping last winter. His two 
trap lines each run about 100 miles long. 

'Shell? No!' Says 
Striking OCAW 

While other oil companies have 
reached satisfactory contract settlements 
with Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers 
International Union, AFL-CIO, the Dutch 
and British-owned Shell company re- 
fuses even to bargain with its 4,000 
United States employees on health and 
safety protections, pension improvements 
and pension plan reviews agreed to by 
American oil companies. 

Now striking Shell employees say 
"No," too. 

They say, "No, we will not accept sec- 
ond-class treatment." 

The United Brotherhood urges you, 
too, to say, "Shell, No!" 

You can say. "No, I will not buy 
gasoline or other oil products from 
Shell," until Shell settles its contract 
or fair terms. "No, I do not want my 
Shell credit card, and Tm mailing it in 
—to P.O. Box 80, Tulsa, Okla." "No, 
I will not support a Dutch/ British com- 
pany which will not treat American 
workers as well as American oil com- 
panies treat them." 

Poiiipano Beach 
Local Entertains 

Local 3206, Pompano Beach, Fla., re- 
cently held a party for the children of 
members. Well over 300 attended. Pony 
rides were provided, together with a 
clown, magician, and Santa. Seven hun- 
dred soft drinks, 400 franks, 360 ham- 
burgers were consumed, and each child 
was given presents. 

Early this year, a "Track Party" was 
held at Pompano Park. It was attended 
by over 600. 





Ray Evans, right, presents the Oldest 
Member Plaque to Gust Klosterman. 

Oldest Carpenter 
Honored at Dayton 

Ray Evans, financial secretary of Car- 
penters Local 104, Dayton. O.. recently 
presented a plaque to the oldest member 
of the local. Gust 
Klosterman, age 
86. 

The local has 
implemented this 
award every year 
since 1966. Frank 
Galloway received 
the 1966 award. 
John Zwirner 
(1967). Ray Vore 
(196S). Otto H. 
Bendig (1969). Ira 
D. Allen (1970), 
and, in 1971 Gust Klosterman received 
the award. 

Klosterman has been a member of 
Local 104 since July 1, 1913. and still 
participates in many of the local's func- 
tions. He has been instrumental in the 
construction of many of our present-day 
buildings in the Dayton area. He work- 
ed on the Reibold Building. Keiths 
Theater. Good Samaritan Hospital, El- 
ders Building. Rikes Building, University 
of Dayton. The Third National Bank. 
Winter National Bank, and many build- 
ings at Wright Patterson Field. 

When he joined the union in 1913. 
the initiation fee was $5.00. He received 
ISi an hour for wages. He recalls that 
a union member then had to hide his 
union card and tell contractors that he 
was not a union member in order to 
obtain a job. 

Klosterman is presently on the Brother- 
hood pension. He was warden from 
1960 to 1970. He also served on the 
apprenticeship committee and many other 
committees. 



Higher Labor Costs? 

No wonder labor costs are so high! 
Computerworld. an industry magazine, 
reports that International Business Ma- 
chines Corp., marks up certain labor and 
maintenance costs about 300 per cent. 
Example: IBM pays an engineer $8 per 
"productive hour" and bills the client $32. 




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Happy Illinois members on vacation in Hawaii assembled for a picture on the beach 
at Honolulu. Tour guide Tom Roche is kneeling at right in the picture. Officers and 
members of the Illinois State Council are standing behind the outrigger canoe. 



Illinois State Council Members Enjoy 
Haivaii Jaunt, Plan ^74 Trip to Spain 



Many members of the Illinois State 
Council of Carpenters and Joiners vaca- 
tioned in Hawaii from February 27 to 
March 7. The charter tour was arranged 
by Jack Zeilenga, secretary-treasurer of 
the Illinois State Council, and by Noel 
Logan, president of host Local 2014. 
Barrington, Illinois. Professional travel 
assistance was given by Tom Roche of 
Travel House Inc., Barrington, who ac- 
companied the tour. 

Through the joint efforts of these men, 
and many others, council members re- 
ceived the benefits and economies of 
charter-group buying. The tour's price, 
hundreds of dollars below an individual's 
cost, included round trip air fare on an 
Overseas National Airways jetliner, 
ground transfers between the airport and 
the hotel, and all hotel accommodations 
for the group's eight-day stay in Hono- 
lulu. 

While some of the group sought sun 
and surf at Waikiki Beach, others found 
time to cruise Pearl Harbor on their 
first day in Hawaii. Many members also 
toured the city of Honolulu, seeing the 
lolani Palace (the only royal palace on 
U.S. soil), and the Punchbowl National 
Cemetery. In the sun-filled days that 
followed, members of the group enjoyed 
a luau at the Hilton Hawaiian Village, 
the Hula Show at Paradise Park, a tour 
completely encircJing the island of Oahu, 
and a porpoise show at Sea Life Park. 
Another popular attraction was a sunset 
cruise on the catamaran sail boat Aikane. 
A visit to the island's unique Polynesian 
Cultural Center was also greatly enjoyed. 

The vacation's highlight for many was 
meeting Al Harrington of "Hawaii 5-0" 
fame on a tour of Honolulu's nightclubs. 
Mr. Harrington stars in his own Polyne- 
sian revue at the Hilton Hawaiian Vil- 
lage. A talented entertainer, he also 



proved to be a gracious Hawaiian host, 
talking with the group after the show that 
night, and taking time to visit with tour 
members again at the Reef Hotel the 
following day. 

The charter was such a success that 
the members of the group requested an- 
other tour next year. As a definite result 
of this enthusiastic response. Jack 
Zeilenga, Noel Logan, and Tom Rouch 
have made arrangements for a new trip. 
Next year, from March 14 to 22, the 
Illinois State Council and Barrington Lo- 
cal 2014 will sponsor a vacation charter 
to Spain's Costa del Sol at Torremolinos, 
on the Spanish Riviera. 

Anyone desiring information concern- 
ing "Carpenter's Spain '74." or wishing to 
make a ticket deposit, may contact Jack 
Zeilenga, Secretary-Treasurer, Illinois 
State Council of Carpenters, 100 W. 
Plainfield Road, Countryside, Illinois 
60525. 

Millwright Opening 
For Returning POW 

If you are looking for a $12,000 to 
$14,000 a year job. Bill Jacobs is the 
fellow to see. 

And better than that, he's going to 
waive the usual $250 union initiation 
dues. 

But the offer does have a couple 
hitches. It's open only to a returning 
prisoner of war, the first one with mill- 
wright qualifications. 

Jacobs is business representative of 
Millwrights' Local 1510, Tampa, Fla., 
and he announced the offer at a recent 
meeting of the Hillsborough County 
Central Labor Union Council. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



Mobile Home Exports 
Surpassetl 12 Million in '72 

The U.S. Department of Commerce recently reported that 
mobile home exports surpassed the $12 million mark during 
1972. 

Canada received approximately 94% of the mobile homes 
exported last year. The 2.594 dwellings delivered to Canada 
were valued at more than Sll million. 

Listed behind Canada were 20 other nations which com- 
prised the final 6% of the exports. 

The second largest recipient was Jamaica, with 47 shipments 
valued at $87,208. Mexico, which received 45 deliveries worth 
$155,488, was third. 

"From every indication, the future of the mobile home in- 
dustry looks bright, especially the $12 million value figure," 
said Charles Pitcher, of the Construction and Building Materials 
Division, U,S, Department of Commerce. 

Labor Renews Opposition 
To Nixon Pension Plan 

A warmed-over pension reform proposal of the Nixon Ad- 
ministration is good on rhetoric but won't help the average 
worker, AFL-CIO President George Meany said. 

Meany noted that the pension legislation President Nixon sent 
to Congress on April 1 1 "is almost exactly what the President 
proposed and we opposed in December 1971," 

In terms of pension security, the President specifically op- 
posed as impractical and "out of keeping with our free enter- 
prise system" the labor-supported concept of government re- 
insurance of private pension plans to guarantee workers against 
loss of benefits if their employer goes out of business or the plan 
is terminated. 

He again supported a degree of mandatory vesting, based en 
a combination of age and service. 



1973 AFL-CIO 

Unlotf 




June 15 thru 20 • 1 p,m. to 10:30 p,m, daily 

Minneapolis Auditorium and Convention Hall 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 



E EstwmJ^=^ 

TRADITION . . . 



Strength 
• Quality 
9 DependabUity 
# Beauty 




Estv/irsg f iis H 
joiee ©f craf 



Take Our Pr&ud Traditicjsi 
f© Work wflih You 

. . . First 8t FinesI 

S@nd Steel Hammers 
Hatehets @ Axes ® Pry Bars 
Handy Ears ® Handy Claws 



SAFETY 


GOGGLES 


Always wear 
Es+wing Sa-fefy 
Goggles +o 


.v^^V^--. 


protect your 
eyes from fly- 
ing nails and 
fragments. 




ONLY $1.85 




Soft, comf 


artable, flexible 



See Your Dealer Today 
or Write: 



Estwing 



2647 8th STREET 



MFG. CO 

ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS 61101 



DEPT. 
C-S 



MAY, 1973 



29 




Winners Selected Blueprint Readers in Kansas City 
In Philadelphia 

Winners of the Philadelphia, Pa., 
Carpenters' Joint Apprentice Committee 
contest have been announced. 

The winner in carpentry. David Law- 
yer of Runnemeade, N.J.. an employee 
of R. M. Shoemaker Co., and a member 
of Carpenters" Local Union 8. 

First place in Mill and Cabinet went 
to Frank Baer of Philadelphia, an em- 
ployee of Alexander Woodwork Co., 
Philadelphia and a member of Local 
359. 

Clifford Nelms of Penndel, Pa., and 
a member of Millwright & Machinery 
Erectors Local 1906, placed first in the 
Millwright contest. 

The Philadelphia Area competition is 
sponsored jointly by the Carpenters' 
Metropolitan District Council and the 
General Building Contractors Associa- 
tion. 




Journeymen of Local 61 in Kansas City, Mo. have been furthering their post- 
graduate education under the Manpower Development and Training Act. The group 
shown above has completed 40 hours of basic mathematics, 40 hours of blueprint 
reading and cost estimating, and 40 hours of level and transit use. 



Union Card Best Buy, 
Says Sylvia Porter 

Higher wages, better benefits, train- 
ing programs and grievance machinery 
are among the advantages union mem- 
bers have over nonunion workers, Sylvia 
Porter noted recently in her syndicated 
column, Your Money's Worth. 

Mrs. Porter also weighed the "cost" 
factors involved in belonging to a union, 
such as monthly dues averaging S3 to S7 
a month and wages lost during strikes, 
although she pointed out that 98 percent 
of union contract negotiations are set- 
tled without a walkout. 

She concluded, however, that "there 
seems no doubt that the pros far out- 
weigh the cons." 

Mrs. Porter noted that union pay 
scales, especially in heavily unionized in- 
dustries and trades, run as much as 40 to 
50 percent higher above those of non- 
union employes. 

She also cited such union-won gains as 
superior pensions, overtime pay, longer 
vacations, health insurance and many 
other benefits that "are nonexistent or 



sharply restricted in the typical nonunion 
company." 

The widely circulated financial col- 
umnist observed that job training pro- 
grams are more available to union work- 
ers, who also are protected against arbi- 
trary treatment by grievance procedures 
in their contracts. 




"We shoulda known better than to 
hire non-union labor!" 



Long Hair Cuts 
Chances of a Job 

Long hair still reduces a worker's 
chances of getting a job. the California 
Unemployment Insurance Appeals Board 
has ruled. 

The board overruled a referee's ruling 
that the longer hair should not deny a 
worker's claim for unemployment com- 
pensation. 

"The claimant's hair," the board said 
in its news release, "is parted in the 
middle and extends below his collar. 
His ears are exposed. He has sideburns 
which extend one inch below the earlobes 
and wears a small moustache. He de- 
cided to let his hair grow after his dis- 
charge from the military service because 
he likes its appearance." 

In its ruling the Appeals Board said, 
"We conclude . . . that the claimant by 
his deliberate actions has voluntarily and 
materially reduced his labor market. 
Hence, he is not available for work and 
is not eligible for benefits." (PAX) 



Attend your local union meetings reg- 
ularly. Be an active member of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



APPRENTICESHIP CONTEST CALENDAR 



State 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

& Vicinity 
Florida 
Idaho 
Illinois 
Indiana 
Iowa 
Kansas 
Louisiana 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

New Mexico 

Nevada 

New Jersey 

New York 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Virgim'a 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Alberta (Can.) 

British Columbia 

(Can.) 
Manitoba, Winnipeg 

(Can.) 
Ontario (Can.) 



Date 

April 



:7-28 



Site of Contest 

Decatur, Ala. 



W-4/ 9-16 M-5-26 
June 21-22-23 



W-6-2— M-6-9 
May 10-11-12 
May 4-5 
May 23-24 
June 22-23 



June 1 

May 18-19-20 
May 18-19 
June 1 
May 16-17 
June 1-2 
June 8-9 
April 27-28 
May 11-12 
May 18-19 
June 4-5-6 
May 16-17 
June 
June 1-2 

April 24 
May 4-5 
April 26-27 
May 5 & 12 

May 24-25-26 



May 19-20 
May 4-5 
June 7-8 



No. Hollywood, Calif. 



Training Center 
St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Pocatello, Idaho 
Springneid, 111. 
Kokomo, Ind. 



Columbia Mall, Md. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Detroit, Mich. 
N.E. Minneapolis 
Sedalia, Mo. 
Billings, Mont. 
Omaha, Neb. 
Albuquerque, N.M. 
Las Vegas. Nev. 

Westbury, L.l., N.Y. 



Eugene, Ore. 

Providence, R.I. 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Austin, Tex. 



Olympia, Wash. 

Cheyenne, Wyo. 
Calgary 

Burnaby 
Toronto, Can. 



Carp 

X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 

X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 



Mill C Mill W 



X 
X 



X 
X 
X 



X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




X 




X 


X 


X 




X 




X 




X 




X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 


X 




X 




X 


X 


X 




X 




X 




X 





X 

X 
X 

44 



19 



New Members at Rock Island, Illinois 



X 

X 



X 

X 

X 

X 
X 

X 

X 
X 

X 

X 

X 



X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 

X 
X 



X 
X 



X 

2^ 




Local 166, Rock Lsland, III., held initiation ceremonies recently for a large group 
of new members, all employees of the local Hynes and Howe Prefabrication Plant. 
Participants in the ceremonies are shown above. 

Seated, left to right, Duane Jenkins, Marjorie Broadus, Sharon Yerky, Joyce Gar- 
rett, Bill Keek and Norman Dewey. Standing, left to right, Donald Gorman, Dennis 
Anderson, Herbert Bcaslcy, Plant Manager; Jeff Mustard, Dewey Riddle, Earl New- 
ton, Mike McCready, Dean Green, business representative, Tri-City Carpenters 
District Council. There were five more members not included in picture. 




The job goes fast and easy 
with a set of Irwin wood bits . . . 
the "work savers." 
You get the set you want, 4, 6, 10 
or 13 bits. You get the sizes you 
need, Va to 1". Individual sizes 
to 1 V2" if you prefer. Choice of 
Irwin's Speedbor® "88" with hollow 
ground point and 'A" electric drill 
shank. Or Irwin's solid center 62T 
hand brace type with double 
spurs and cutters. 

Get set to save work 

Both types deliver 
accurate "work sa' 
action. Forged fro 
bars of finest tool 
Machine-sharpe 
Heat tempered f 
lengtri. Get set. 
Buy fforn your 
hardware, fiome 
center or building 
supply store soon 

® Registered U.S. Patent Oil 




IRWIN 



every bit as good 
as the name 



at Wilmington, Ohio 45177, since 1885 




Lee 



M 



-•^•^^ 



UNION MADE 

"CARPENTERS' 
OVERALLS 



Made to put in 
a hard day's work 

Designed by Carpenters 
Especially for Carpenters 

There's plenty of comfort, con- 
venience and work-saving fea- 
tures in these overalls. Made 
just like you want 'em ... be- 
cause they're designed by work- 
ers like yourself. Guaranteed to 
be the best you've ever worn or 
we'll take 'em back. No ques- 
tions asked. 

H. D. Lee Company, Inc. 
Shawnee Mission, Kansas 

A coni[Xiny oi r cor[>j(atiori 



MAY, 19 73 



31 




GOSSIP 



SEND YOUR FAVORITES TO: 

PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONSTITUTION 

AVE. NW, WASH., D.C. 20001. 

SORRY, BUT NO PAYMENT MADE 

AND POETRY NOT ACCEPTED. 



You're Excused 

The man called to jury duly asked 
the court if he could be excused, ex- 
plaining, "I owe a man $50. hie is 
leaving town today, and I want to 
see him before he gets away so I can 
pay him the money." 

"You are excused," said the judge. 
"I don't want anybody on the jury 
who can lie like you." 

STRIKE A LICK— GIVE TO CLIC 

Criminal Type 

Conscientious Citizen: "Your hlon- 
or, I couldn't serve on the jury. One 
look at that man there convinces me 
he's guilty." 

Judge: "Quiet! That is the district 
attorney." 

MAKE YOUR SSS CLICK— GIVE TO CLIC 

Another Double Take 

When a spinster was asked why 
she had traded in her double bed for 
twin beds, she said: "Because every 
night I look under the bed to see if 
a man is there. With two beds, my 
chances are doubled." 



Limited Engagement 

Some speakers and most listeners 
approve of the rule among certain 
tribes In Africa. Their regulation is 
that when a man rises to speak he 
must stand on one foot while deliv- 
ering his oration. The minute the 
lifted foot touches the ground, the 
speech ends — or the speaker is for- 
cibly silenced. 

R U REGISTERED 2 VOTE? 

Shooting the Bull 

The lion sprang upon the bull and 
devoured him. After he had feasted, 
he felt so good that he roared and 
roared. The noise attracted hunters 
and they killed the lion. The moral of 
which is that when you are full of 
bull, keep your mouth shut. 

U R THE "U" IN UNIONISM 




Early Diagnosis 

A young wife came home the other 
day wearing a pair of fashionable tex- 
tured stockings. "What do you 
think?" she asked her husband. 

"Leave it alone," he said. "If it 
doesn't go away in a few days, we'll 
call a doctor." 



This Month's Limerick 

A silly young fellow named hlyde. 
In a funeral procession was spied; 

When asked, "Who is dead?" 

hie giggled and said, 
"I don't know; I just came for the 
ride." 




Not-So-Educated 

The farmer had even mortgaged 
his farm to give his luscious daughter 
a college education. After the first 
year, returning home, she said: "Paw, 
I got to confess: I ain't innocent 
no more!" 

Reproachfully, the old farmer re- 
plied: "After all yore maw and I 
done to get you a college edduca- 
shun . . . and you still say 'ain't'!" 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 

Double Take 

"hHow come you never married?" 
a man asked an old friend. 

"I really don't know," replied the 
bachelor. "I've come close a number 
of times. Just the other day I fell in 
love with a girl at first sight." 

"And you're not going to marry 
her?" 

"No, I took a second look." 

BUY ONLY UNION-MADE TOOLS 

Doing Her Duty 

When the old maid found a robber 
under her bed, she covered him with 
a gun while she called the police and 
told them to send a cop over In the 
morning. 

UNION MEN ^X'ORK SAFELY 

Non-Taxable Male 

'Are you in favor of a tax on 
bachelors?" the heckler called out to 
the political candidate. 

"I had supposed," replied the 
speaker, "that I had already made it 
perfectly clear that I am opposed to 
any tax on raw material." 

UNIONISM STARTS WITH "U" 

Biggest Ice Cube? 

When Alaska was admitted to the 
Union, thus becoming the largest 
state, Governor Price Daniels of 
Texas said, "Just wait until all that 
snow and ice melts. Then they'll find 
out which is the biggest state." 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



1 




1 


TS3 



Local 

Union 

Contri- 

Local City & State bmions 

ARIZONA 

857 Tucson 100.00 



Con- 
vention 
Contri- 
butions Total 



100.00 



CALIFORNIA 






35 San Rafael 


56.00 




56.00 


586 Sacramento 




10.00 


10.00 


710 Long Beach 




1 0.00 


10.00 


721 Los Angeles 




10.00 


10.00 


929 Los Angeles 


10.00 




10.00 


1140 San Pedro 




10.00 


10.00 


1149 San Francisco 


10.00 


15.00 


25.00 


1335 Wilmington 


26.00 




26.00 


1407 San Pedro 




20.00 


20.00 


1495 Chico 




10.00 


10.00 


1599 Redding 




10.00 


10.00 


1815 Santa Ana 


62.00 




62.00 


1869 Manteca 


2.00 




2.00 


1959 Riverside 


30.00 




30.00 


1976 Los Angeles 


44.00 




44.00 


2020 San Diego 




15.00 


15.00 


2172 Santa Ana 




20.00 


20.00 


2288 Los Angeles 




60.00 


60.00 


2308 Fullerton 




5.00 


5.00 


2341 Willits 




20.00 


20.00 


2505 Klamath 




10.00 


10.00 


2561 Fresh Pond 




10.00 


10.00 


2592 Eureka 




40.00 


40.00 


2608 Redding 




60.00 


60.00 


2688 Elk Creek 




20.00 


20.00 


2728 Omo Ranch 




30.00 


30.00 


2749 Caniino 




10.00 


10.00 


2789 Areata 




20.00 


20.00 


2801 Oroville 




20.00 


20.00 


2808 Areata 




20.00 


20.00 


2882 Santa Rosa 




30.00 


30.00 


2907 Weed 




30.00 


30.00 


2927 Martell 




20.00 


20.00 


2931 Eureka 




30.00 


30.00 


3019 Eureka 




20.00 


20.00 


3074 Chester 




10.00 


10.00 


3170 Sacramento 




75.00 


75.00 


3184 Fresno 


10.00 


10.00 


20.00 



COLORADO 

2834 Denver 20.00 

CONNECTICUT 



20.00 



30 

43 

825 


New London 40.00 20.00 
Hartford 20.00 
Willimantic 40.00 

DELAWARE 


60.00 
20.00 
40.00 


626 
1545 
2012 


Wilmington 10.00 
Wilmington 10.00 
Seaford 20.00 

WASHINGTON, D.C. 


10.00 
10.00 
20.00 


132 
1145 


Washington, 

D.C. 97.36* 40.00 
Washington, 

D.C. 45.68* 


137.36 
45.68 











Local 


Con- 












Linion 


vention 












Contri- 


Contri- 










Local City & State 


butions 


butions 


Total 








MASSACHUSETTS 










32 Springfield 


83.00 


170.00 


253.00 


W3^W3^\ 


ID 


T 


33 Boston 




50.00 


50.00 


W%^^w^^^ 


W% 


1 


40 Boston 




130.00 


130.00 








41 Woburn 




55.00 


55.00 








48 Fitchburg 




60.00 


60.00 


'•'4'*-W*'*' W *'*'*'*'*'*'*'*'*'*'*'*' *'*^*'*'*'*^ *"*'»'«'*'«' WV* 






49 Lowell 




10.00 


10.00 




'•'^■i$^'Mi^i 


'^^^^t 


51 Boston 




135.00 


135.00 








56 Boston 
67 Boston 




85.00 
180.00 


85.00 
180.00 


IS as of April 13, 


1973 


82 Haverhill 
107 Worcester 
111 Lawrence 




20.00 

130.00 

50.00 


20.00 

130.00 

50.00 


Local 
Union 
Contri- 


Con- 
vention 
Contri- 




193 North Adams 
218 Boston 
275 Newton 


43.00 


40.00 
60.00 
50.00 


83.00 
60.00 
50.00 


Local City & State butions 


3ntions 


Total 


327 Attleboro 
351 Northampton 




10.00 
50.00 


10.00 
50.00 


1339 Washington, 






390 Holyoke 




40.00 


40.00 


D.C. 


10.00 


10.00 


400 Hudson 




20.00 


20.00 


1590 Washington, 






424 Hingham 




30.00 


30.00 


D.C. 155.74* 


45.00 


200.74 


444 Pittsfield 


20.00 


45.00 


65.00 


1631 Washington, 






549 Greenfield 




30.00 


30.00 


D.C. 33.68* 


20.00 


53.68 


595 Lynn 




20.00 


20.00 


1831 Washington, 






624 Brockton 


28.00 


20.00 


48.00 


D.C. 14.48* 




14.48 


656 Holyoke 




30.00 


30.00 


2311 Washington, 






762 Quincy 




30.00 


30.00 


D.C. 68.32* 




68.32 


860 Framingham 
866 Norwood 




80.00 
20.00 


80.00 
20.00 


FLORIDA 






878 Beverly 
888 Salem 




60.00 
40.00 


60.00 
40.00 


1509 Miami 40.00 




40.00 


988 Marlboro 




10.00 


10.00 


1510 Tampa 40.00 




40.00 


1035 Taunton 




40.00 


40.00 


1725 Daytona Beach 80.00 




80.00 


1121 Boston (Vic.) 
1 144 Danvers 




50.00 
10.00 


50.00 
10.00 


GEORGIA 






1 305 Fall River 




55.00 


55.00 


225 Atlanta 74.00 




74.00 


1331 Barnstable (C 


0.) 


30.00 


30.00 


283 Augusta 10.00 




10.00 


1416 New Bedford 
1459 Westboro 




30.00 
10.00 


30.00 
10.00 


IDAHO 






1479 Walpole 




20.00 


20.00 


2816 Emmelt 


50.00 


50.00 


1503 Amherst 




20.00 


20.00 


2257 Ahsahka 


10.00 


10.00 


MICHIGAN 






ILLINOIS 






1132 Alpena 




10.00 


10.00 


62 Chicago 10.00 




10.00 


MINNESOTA 




181 Chicago 112.00 




112.00 










916 Aurora 10.00 




10.00 


851 Anoka 


20.00 




20.00 


1185 Chicago 60.00 




60.00 


2434 Worthington 


12.00 




12.00 


1307 Evanston 37.00 




37.00 
















MISSOURI 






INDIANA 






61 Kansas City 


100.00 




100.00 


232 Fort Wayne 
1380 Bedford 


10.00 
5.00 


10.00 
5.00 


110 St. Joseph 
1310 St. Louis 


60.84 
50.00 




60.84 
50.00 


IOWA 






MONTANA 






4 Davenport 64.00 




64.00 


88 Anaconda 


10.00 




10.00 


1034 Oskaloosa 


5.00 


5.00 


286 Great Falls 
2408 Kalispell 


2.00 


10.00 


2.00 
10.00 


KANSAS 






2581 Libby 
2685 Missoula 




25.00 
10.00 


25.00 
10.00 


561 Pittsburg 20.00 




20.00 


2719 Thompson Falls 


10.00 


10.00 








3038 Bonner 




5.00 


5.00 


KENTUCKY 














64 Louisville 20.00 




20.00 


NEVADA 






442 Hopkinville 


1 0.00 


10.00 


1780 Las Vegas 


43.00 




43.00 


2310 IVIadisonville 5.00 




5.00 
















NEW HAMPSHIRE 




LOUISIANA 






625 Manchester 


40.00 




40.00 


1312 New Orleans 


10.00 


10.00 


921 Portsmouth 


24.00 


10.00 


34.00 


2192 Ruston 17.00 




17.00 










2436 New Orleans 24.00 




24.00 


NEW JERSEY 




MARYLAND 






15 Hackensack 
23 Dover 


110.00 


20.00 
5.00 


130.00 
5.00 


101 Baltimore 


20.00 


20.00 


31 Trenton 




10.00 


10.00 


340 Hagerstown 


10.00 


10.00 


65 Perth Amboy 




10.00 


10.00 


1024 Cumberland 


10.00 


10.00 


119 Newark 




10.00 


10.00 


1126 Annapolis 10.00 


5.00 


15.00 


121 Vineland 




15.00 


15.00 


1876 Salisbury 


10.00 


10.00 


155 Plainfield 




10.00 


10.00 



MAY, 1973 



33 



Local City & State 



325 Paterson 




10.00 


349 Orange 




15.00 


393 Camden 




10.00 


399 Phillipsbuigh 




10.00 


432 Atlantic City 




35.00 


455 Soraerville 


35.91* 


10.00 


486 Bayonne 




10.00 


490 Passaic 




15.00 


612 Union Hill 


20.00 




620 Madison 




25.00 


821 Newark 




45.00 


1006 New Brunswick 




5.00 


1117 Kenilworth 


30.42* 




1209 Newark 




15.00 


1489 Burlington 


46.65* 


5.00 


1743 Wildwood 


20.00 




2018 Lakewood 


100.00 


15.00 


2212 Newark 


14.64* 




2250 Red Bank 


185.69* 


30.00 


2315 Jersey City 


20.00 




NEW MEXICO 


1319 Albuquerque 




15.00 


1385 Espanola 




10.00 


2517 Cuba 




10.00 


2864 Bernalillo 




5.00 


2867 Albuquerque 




30.00 


2887 Oilman 




10.00 


NEW YORK 




53 White Plains 


40.00 




125 Utica 


61.00 




146 Schenectady 


60.00 




203 Poughkeepsie 


40.00 




366 New York 


18.00 




502 Canandaigna 


60.00 




729 Liberty 


40.00 




1015 Saratoga Springs 


10.00 


1093 Glencove 


31.00 




1135 Port Jefferson 


60.00 




1167 Smithlown 






Brnch. 


60.00 




1204 New York 


60.00 




1701 Buflfalo 


20.00 




1772 Hicksville 


40.00 




1973 Riverhead 


30.00 




2305 New York 




20.00 


NORTH CAROLINA 


522 Durham 


10.00 




OHIO 




69 Canton 


10.00 




484 Akron 


100.00 




650 Pomeroy 


60.00 




OKLAHOMA 




329 Oklahoma City 




10.00 


986 McAlester 


10.00 




1585 Lawton 


20.00 




OREGON 




738 Portland 




10.00 


780 Astoria 


20.00 




1017 Redmond 




10.00 


1020 Portland 




5.00 


1157 Lebanon 




30.00 


1390 Brownsville 




20.00 


1746 Portland 




10.00 


2195 Gardiner 




25.00 


2521 Triangle Lake 




20.00 


2530 Gilchrist 


20.00 


20.00 


2554 Lebanon 




50.00 


2588 Bates 




10.00 


2627 Cottage Grove 




10.00 


2636 Valsetz 




10.00 


2691 Coquille 




20.00 


2698 Bandon 




25.00 


2714 Dallas 




30.00 


2715 Medford 




10.00 


2750 Springfield 




40.00 



Local Con- 

TJnJon vention 
Contri- Contri- 
butions butions Total 



10.00 
15.00 
10.00 
10.00 
35.00 
45.91 
10.00 
15.00 
20.00 
25.00 
45.00 
5.00 
30.42 
15.00 
51.65 
20.00 

115.00 
14.64 

215.69 
20.00 



15.00 
10.00 
10.00 
5.00 
30.00 
10.00 



40.03 
61.00 
60.00 
40.00 
18.00 
60.00 
40.00 
10.00 
31.00 
60.00 

60.00 
60.00 
20.00 
40.00 
30.00 
20.00 



10.00 

10.00 

100.00 

60.00 



10.00 
10.00 
20.00 



10.00 
20.00 
10.00 
5.00 
30.00 
20.00 
10.00 
25.00 
20.00 
40.00 
50.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
20.00 
25.00 
30.00 
10.00 
40.00 



Local City & State 



Local 
L'n:on 
Contri- 
butions 



Con- 
vention 
Contri- 
butions Total 



2756 
2780 
2784 
2787 
2791 
2822 
2829 
2851 
2881 
2896 
2902 
2916 
2924 
2941 
2942 
2949 
2961 
2970 
3009 
3035 
3064 
3091 



59 
81 
122 
142 
191 
206 
228 
230 
239 
261 
268 
287 
321 
333 

359 

406 

422 

430 

454 

492 

500 

514 

541 

556 

571 

691 

709 

773 

838 

843 

845 

900 

947 

972 

1000 

1010 

1050 

1160 

1333 

1419 

1441 

1759 

1823 

1906 

2235 

2264 

2274 



Goshen 

Elgin 
Coquille 
Springfield 
Sweet Home 
St. Helens 
Forest Grove 
La Grande 
Portland 
Lyons 
Burns 
Kinzua 
John Day 
Warm Springs 
Albany 
Roseburg 
St. Helens 
Pilot Rock 
Grants Pass 
Springfield 
Toledo 
Vaughn 



10.00 
10.00 
45.00 
20.00 
10.00 
20.00 
10.00 
45.00 
25.00 
10.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
30.00 
35.00 
60.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
10.00 
10.00 
30.00 



PENNSYLVANIA 



Lancaster 

Erie 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 

York 

Newcastle 

Pottsville 

Pittsburgh 

Easton 

Scranton 

Sharon 

Harrisburg 

Connellsville 

New 

Kensington 
Philadelphia 
Bethlehem 
New Brighton 
Wilkinsburg 
Philadelphia 
Reading 
Butler 

Wilkes-Barre 
Washington 
Meadville 
Carnegie 
Williamsport 
Shenandoah 
Braddock 
Sunbury 
Jenkintown 
Clifton Heights 
Altoona 
Ridgway 
Philadelphia 
Greenville 
Uniontown 
Philadelphia 
Pittsburgh 
State College 
Johnstown 
Bethel Park 
Pittsburgh 
Philadelphia 
Philadelphia 
Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 



60.00 
50.00 



6.00 
27.00 



12.00 
40.00 



16.00 



13.00 
17.00 

18.00 



20.00 

20.00 

100.00 



10.00 



30.00 
20.00 

10.00 
10.00 
20.00 
10.00 
10.00 
30.00 



10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
15.00 
10.00 
40.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 

10.00 
10.00 
15.00 
10.00 

10.00 

10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
20.00 
10.00 

10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
20.00 
60.00 
10.00 
30.00 



RHODE ISLAND 

801 Woonsocket 30.00 



10.00 
10.00 
45.00 
20.00 
10.00 
20.00 
10.00 
45.00 
25.00 
10.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
30.00 
35.00 
60.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
10.00 
10.00 
30.00 



10.00 
60.00 
50.00 
30.00 
20.00 
6.00 
37.00 
10.00 
20.00 
10.00 
10.00 
30.00 
12.00 

50.00 
10.00 
10.00 
15.00 
10.00 
40.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
16.00 
10.00 
10.00 
15.00 
23.00 
17.00 
10.00 
18.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
20.00 
30.00 
20.00 
110.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
20.00 
60.00 
10.00 
30.00 



30.00 



TENNESSEE 



345 Memphis 
1462 Bristol 
1818 Clarksville 



20.00 20.00 

24.00 24.00 

40.00 40.00 

Continued on Page 38 



Bay Area Contribution 




Members of Local 483, San Francisco, 
recently collected $1,200 for CLIC. Russ 
Poole, center, financial secretary of the 
local, made a check presentation of the 
sizable donation to General President 
William Sidell, right, and CLIC Director 
Charles Nichols during the recent AFL- 
CIO Building Trades Legislative Confer- 
ence in Washington, D.C. 

Honor Roll Display 



CLIC NEEDS yoy IN 
HONOR - ROLL 





Local 839, Des Plaines, Illinois, honors 
its members who contribute to CLIC 
with an honor roll display in the lobby 
of its business office. The 1972 con- 
tributors are listed in the display above. 
Another such display has been started for 
1973. 



34 



THE CARPENTER 



Farewell Party for Office Secretary 




Honored guests at a recent reception at the Pines Bridge Lodge, Ossining, N.Y.. 
were Mr. and Mrs. Michael Culhane of White Plains, N.Y. Mrs. Culhane is secretary 
to Lucius Pendleton, secretary of the Westchester Carpenter's District Council. 

Mr. Culhane, a longtime employee of IBM, has been transferred to Bowie, Md., 
and Mrs. Culhane, or Bridget, as she is known, has resigned her position at the 
council for the move to Maryland. 

Shown with the Culhanes, left to right, front row, are Michael Pagano, president 
of Local 1115, Pleasantville and William Amato, president of Local 895, Tarrytown. 

Second row, left to right, William A. Kerr, Gabriel R. Galletto, president of Local 
447, Ossining. Mr. and Mrs. Culhane, and Anthony Questo, president of Local 1420, 
Hastuigs, Kerr and Amato are business representatives for the local unions sponsoring 
the dinner. 




DO 



000 



. . . those members of our Brotherhood who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to pubHc offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "stood 
out from the crowd." This month, our editorial hat is off to the followins: 






BLOOD DONORS— Four members of the District Council of Carpenters of Portland. 
Ore., have received plaques in recognition of their donations of five gallons of blood 
each to the Portland District Council of Carpenters Blood Bank. 

From left to right, they are: E. E. Charpentier Local 226; Harry Carlson Local 
583; Ken Wall, Local 1020 and chairman of the blood bank; Swan Nelson, executive 
secretarj; John A. DeFrance, Local 226; and V. Dale \ auHoy, Local 226. 

Since the presentation of these plaques, Charpentier has reached the 6-gallon 
plateau in the blood program. 




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Orville Pierce 
LaPuente. Calif. 




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35 




IN MEMORIT^M 



L.U. NO. 2 
CINCINNATI, OHIO 

Neal, Charles 

L.U. NO. 4 
DAVENPORT, IOWA 

Beberniss, August 
Schneider, Arthur 

L.U. NO. 7 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Grotenhus, Ray 
Olson, Henry L. 
Rozman, George T. 

L.U. NO. 13 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Basik, Victor E. 
Hagen, Haldor 
■Hans, Jacob 
Johnson, George 
Kennedy, Fred J. 
Kern, Alfred L. 
Klasen, Walter N. 
LeGrady, Arthur E. 
Lohrman, Arlington 
Olund, P. G. 
Rose, James M. 
Scanlan, George T. 
Schooler, Murray 
Wehman, William A. 

L.U. NO. 15 
HACKENSACK, N.J. 

Conklin, Norman 
Demko, John M. 
Hope, Joseph E. 
Marconi, Michael 
Schipper, Peter 
Swack, John J. 

L.U. NO. 22 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

CALIF. 

Brisbin, Stu 
Chiasson, Jobe 
Enevold, C. 
Foster, F. H. 
Gianocca, Joe 
Hall, A. R. 
Helli, Toivo 
Kenison, Lyman 
Kinter, Willis E. 
McGee, Patrick 
Middelweerd, John 
Olson, R. W. 
Palm, Carl V. 
Pierce, C. A. 
Sekols, Sam 
Stephenson, Gilbert H. 

L.U. NO. 27 
TORONTO, ONT. 

Campbell, George 
Howell, Stewart 
Knight, Frank 
Morrison, Neil 
G'Boyle, E. P. 
Tanchyk, James 

L.U. NO. 31 
TRENTON, N.J. 

Adler, Ernest 
Bresnen, Thomas J. 

L.U. NO. 33 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Gesson, Abraham 
Gioia, John B. 



Glazer, Samuel 
Nevers, Roland F. 
O'Brien, John 
Rawding, William H. 
Short, William 
Thorne, Stewart D. 

L.U. NO. 36 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Andrade, Alvah A. 
Barnard, Lester N. 
Behrns. William E. 
Brandt, Fred C. 
Hicks, O. E. 
McGuigan, W. J. 
Tornell. Waldemar C. 
Troan, Elmer 

L.U. NO. 46 

S. STE. MARIE, MICH. 

Beck, Emil 
Hendrickson. Henry 
LaCross. Wilfred 
Mayer, Isadore 

L.U. NO. 50 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Castleberry, Arlo 
Rucker, Percy 

L.U. NO. 54 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Kosatka, Fred 
Koutnik, John F. 
Mrak, Anton 

L.U. NO. 55 
DENVER, COLO. 

Harris, A. T. 
Perko, Louis 

L.U. NO. 61 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Eslick, T. L. 
Hayne, John M. 
Vanderstay, B. J. 
Yancey, Elbert 

L.U. NO. 80 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Allen, Fred A. 
Anderson, Alfred C. 
Brebner, James 
Johnson, Alfred C. 
Koertgen, Bernard J., Sr. 
Olson, Eric 
Palinkas, Gabor 
Ryman, William 
Stoddart, Arthur T. 

L.U. NO. 82 
HAVERHILL, MASS. 

Robidoux, William 

L.U. NO. 100 
MUSKEGON, MICH. 

Michel, Fred 
Woodard, Floyd 
Young, Donald 

L.U. NO. 101 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Bruns, Herman 
Copeland, Richard D. 
Johnson, Charles R. 
Mowbray, Leonard K. 
Scanland, C. M. 



L.U. NO. 106 

DES MOINES, IOWA 

Gerard, J. E. 
Helgeland, Jenius 
Smith. Lyle C. 
Wilfon, Frank 

L.U. NO. 115 
BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 

Black, Robert 
Chartier, Henry 
Gallant, Jacques 
Laskay, Charles, Sr. 
Molleaip, Robert 
Perez, Thomas 
Pilotti, Perry, Sr. 

L.U. NO. 129 
HAZLETON, PA. 

Drosdick, Joseph J. 

L.U. NO. 132 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Eller, Lawson P. 
Phillips, Edward R. 

L.U. NO. 134 
MONTREAL, QUE. 

Menard, Bruno 
Saarela, Lauri 
Senneville. Jean-Louis 

L.U. NO. 166 

ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 

Bolwar, John 
Park, James 

L.U. NO. 181 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Berggren, John 
Fenske, Robert 

L.U. NO. 184 

SALT LAKE CITY, 

UTAH 

Aamodt, Edwin H. 
Ashby, H. L. 
Behr, William 
Bennett. Wilford G. 
Frandsen, Hales N. 
Ingram, George 
Jones, Albert 
Knapp, Alex 
Lambourne, E. C. 
Linde, James 
Loder, Lawrence 
Mjaseth, J. G. 
Odor, Charles 
Sims, Virgil 
Varney, George 
Warren, Adejbert 
Williams, Stanley 
Yates, Marvin 

L.U. NO. 200 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Eads, Paul 
O'Keefe, John 

L.U. NO. 218 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Candow, Arthur 
Hillier, Andrew 
Rowther, AUister B. 
Tassanari, Arrigo 

L.U. NO. 225 
ATLANTA, GA. 

Cash, E. H. 



Giles, Charlie M. 
O'Rear, Mercer L. 
Spruill, B. C. 
Steadham, A. D. 

L.U. NO. 226 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Diel, Fred C. 
Ferriell, F. J. 
Johansson, Axel 
Krening, Jacob 
Lee, Francis W. 

L.U. NO. 246 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Dechiaro, Michael 
Farrenkopf, George 
Garcia, Guadalupe 

L.U. NO. 257 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

LinkofF, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 281 
BINGHAMTON, N.Y. 

Hickey, Thomas 

L.U. NO. 287 
HARRISBURG, PA. 

Larsen, Henry 
Myers, Robert 

L.U. NO. 299 
UNION CITY, N.J. 

Buessing, Henry 
Dazza, Renaldo 
Saintate, Vincent 

L.U. NO. 337 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Banners, Frank 
Barlow, Sidney 
Cornelius, Fred 
Custred, Harry 
Drake, Robert 
Duckett, Ernest F. 
Kuliga, Alfred 
McDonough, Edward 
Perdue, Wallace 

L.U. NO. 343 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 

Brandson, William 
Cheater, Charles 
Christenson, Alex 
DeJong, Otto 
Edberg. Einar 
Elchyshyn, John 
Kittle, Harold 
Klassen, Heindrich 
MacLennan, K. A. 
Sawka. William 
Petersen, Herbert 
Vogelsang, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 385 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Daru, Guerino 
DeGiovanni, Bruno 
Koerber, Wilhelm 
Mazzaro, Patsy 
Ponticello, Carlo 

L.U. NO. 411 

SAN ANGELO, TEX. 

Alves, Adolf A. 

L.U. NO. 414 
NANTICOKE, PA. 

Christian, Charles 



L.U. NO. 453 
AUBURN, N.Y. 

Main, Elwood 
Philips, Clyde 

L.U. NO. 494 
WINDSOR, ONT. 

Pryde, J. 
Ray, M. 
Renaud, C. 

L.U. NO. 543 
MAMARONECK, N.Y. 

Binder, Louis 
Bova, Angelo 
Casta, Bruno 
Fontana, Pietro S. 
Funneciello, John 
Lagonigro, Paul 
Landry, Patrick 
Lerza, Pasquale 
Marullo. Vittorio 
Poccia, Albert 
Scelia, Gasper 

L.U. NO. 608 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Buerstle, Michael 
Cywinski, Anthony 
Egan, Kiernan 
Floyd, James 

L.U. NO. 661 
OTTAWA, ILL. 

Smith, George 

L.U. NO. 674 

MX. CLEMENS, MICH. 

Rosseau, Hugh 

L.U. NO. 691 
WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 

Alexander, Harvey J. 
Grafrus, William J. 

L.U. NO. 698 
NEWPORT, KY. 

Marschman, Ernie 

L.U. NO. 710 

LONG BEACH, CALIF. 

Culler, John J. 
Gable, Leo 
Lang, Carl B. 
Sutton, Dave 
Van Manen, Gary 

L.U. NO. 745 

HONOLULU, 

HAWAII 

Okuda, Mamoru 
Tokunaga, Richard S. 
Yamada. Raymond 
Yamada, Tadao 
Yoshimoto, Hideo 

L.U. NO. 833 
BERWYN, PA. 

Williams, George 

L.U. NO. 925 
SALINAS, CALIF. 

Brown, Romie 

L.U. NO. 982 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Coughenour, John 
Desentz, Albert H. 
Dzickowski, Leonard 
Montour, Joseph K. 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



LiU. NO. 1042 
PLATTSBURGH, N.Y. 

Hemingway, Alfred 

L.U. NO. 1068 
VALLE.IO, CALIF. 

Nordvald, Matt 

L.U. NO. 1074 
EAU CLAIRE, WIS. 

Kopp, Griffin 
Wold, Douglas 

L.U. NO. 1093 
GLENCOVE, N.Y. 
Dorber, Malcolm 
Howell, George 
Kasso, Cornell 
Lisa, Charles 
Olsen, Lester 
Rant, Benjamin 

L.U. NO. 1098 
BATON ROUGE. LA. 

Green, William R. 
Porter, Ben L. 

L.U. NO. 1114 

S. MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

Walsh, Vene 

L.U. NO. 1138 
TOLEDO, OHIO 

Harris, Lewis, Sr. 
Reynolds, Orland 
Widmer, Andrew 

L.U. NO. 1367 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Graiber, Theodore 



L.U. NO. 1394 L.U. NO. 1615 

FT. LAUDERDALE, FLA. GRAND RAPIDS, iVIICH. 

Hunter, Turner S. Watermulder, Albert 



L.U. NO. 1397 

N. HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. 

Falkowskj, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 1497 

E. LOS ANGELES, 

CALIF. 

Bucher, Albert E. 
Christenson, Arnold I. 
Christensen, Menser C. 
Dunn, Joseph 
Gallegos, Reynaldo 
Glover, Alton H. 
Heise. Otto 
Hernandez, Raymon 
Hopkins, Joseph A. 
Kirby, Sam 
Lesher, Allen 
Lubin, George D. 
McDonough. Leo L. 
Marquez. Julian 
Miller, Marvin E. 
Peterman, Lyle 
Riebau, Allen K. 
St. John, Roy H. 
Schultz, Lincoln 
Scott, William W. 
Settle, John W. 
Smith, Charles F. 
Teschler, Carl 
Todd, Marvin C. 
Trotter, J. W. 
Turner, George 
Wattelet, W. L. 
Whitaker, James A. 

L.U. NO. 1518 
GULFPORT, MISS. 

Dedeaux, John B. 



L.U. NO. 1622 
HAYWARD, CALIF. 

Boom, Kenneth 
Brock, Abner C. 
Chapman, E. W. 
Creech, Walter L. 
Debalto, Charles N. 
Duggan, James W. 
Dunlap, Leonard 
Dutra, George 
Hannula, John 
Hunt, Charles 
Merrow, Albert W. 
Mooney, Carle A. 
Reeves, Harry K. 
Schuppert, R. P. 
Strother, Lester C. 
Tomlinson, D. L. 
Ubrick, Phillip 
Wadsworth, Harvey 
Wallace, Eugene P. 
Wass, R. A. 

I.U. NO. 1752 
POMONA, CALIF. 

Ahart, Donald 
Anderson, Harris 
Bass, Calvin 
Damhus, August 
Farley, Peyton 
Garvey, Jess 
Hall, Lee 
Johnson, Gilbert 
Thomas, Glen M. 
Watson, Johnnie 

L.U. NO. 1772 
HICKSVILLE, N.Y. 

Bulavko, Alexander 
Busch, James M. 



L.U. NO. 1846 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Ahsenmacher, Ernest 
Airhart. William 
Arnold, Owen 
Baudin, Ellis 
Bergeron. Peter 
Bivona, John C. 
Breaux. Ecton 
Burger, Charles 
Burkhardt, James 
Campeaux. George 
Coignet. John 
Cole, Robert, Jr. 
Creel, John 
D'Anelo, Prospero 
Daunis. Evans F. 
Delaune, Louis 
Ducote. Aaron 
Edwards, Sol 
Fatzer, Harold 
Ferguson, Edward 
Fontenot. Elton 
Francisco, Albert 
Gennaro, Emile 
Giafaglione, Salvador 
Gill, Russell 
Gravois, Charles H., Jr. 
Grisoli, Frank 
Kinchen, Melvin 
Khne, Robert L. 
Laciura. Joseph L. 
Leblanc, Abel J. 
Leblanc, Harris 
Leteff, George 
Lochbrunner, V. 
Murphy. Jeremiah 
Normand, Alton A. 
Nunez, Alexander 
Pickens, Clarence 
Sinagra, John 
Sticker, Rufus 



Trascher, Adolph 
Vahrenhorst, Hubert 
Yax, Herbert 

L.U. NO. 1896 

THE DALLES, OREG. 

House, Ellis 

L.U. NO. 1976 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Canales, Ruban 
Marine, Pierre 

L.U. NO. 2090 

ST. JEROME, QUE. 

Therien, Maurice 

L.U. NO. 2203 
ANAHEIM, CALIF. 

Montoya, Reymundo 
Tizzard, William E. 
Webber, Clyde 

L.U. NO. 2287 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Berger, Joseph 
Cowan, Monroe 
Hanson, Walter 
Park, John 

L.U. NO. 2311 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Pilipauskis, B. V. 

L.U. NO. 2471 
PENSACOLA, FLA. 

Owen, Walker B. 
Ward, John A. 

L.U. NO. 2762 
NORTH FORK, CALIF. 

Lee, Wilbur 



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ADDRESS- 
CITY 



_STATE_ 



19 Canadian Workers 
Killed Every Week 

by Marc Wyman 
CPA Special Correspondent 

Every week 19 Canadians are killed 
on the job, and on any average working 
day over 2,240 are injured. 

Despite management resistance to 
worker participation in safety programs, 
the labour movement is keeping up its 
push for safer on-the-job conditions. 

The situation is serious. In 1971 — the 
last year for which figures are available 
— at least 991 Canadians died in indus- 
trial accidents. 

The real total is higher. The 991 
doesn't include people who are self- 
employed or who hold jobs in agricul- 
ture, fishing, banking, trapping, some 
service industries, firms with less than 
four employees — and so on. 

The real death toll for 1971 is prob- 
ably well over 1,300. 

The cost in human terms can't be cal- 
culated. Loss of life or limb is bad 
enough. What about the suffering of the 
victims" families? 

The economic cost can be guessed at. 
For instance, the Ontario Workmen's 
Compensation Board paid out $137 mil- 
lion in compensation and medical bene- 
fits in 1971. Compensation across Can- 
ada costs a million dollars every working 
day. 

Another approach to economic cost is 
through time lost. In 1965. 7 million 
man-days were lost on account of acci- 
dents, which was jour times the average 
annual loss resulting from strikes and 
lockouts. 

Accidents indicate management ineffi- 
ciency and loss of control, says W. A. 
Martin of the accident prevention divi- 
sion of the federal Labour Department. 

That's , because management doesn't 
want worker participation, says Steel- 
workers' national director, William Ma- 
honey. Jack Dowling. the union's safety 
chief, agrees. He also stresses that every 
Steelworker local is supposed to have a 
compensation and a safety and health 
committee, and most do. 

Thousands of unionists across Canada 
are pushing hard for better safety and 
health practices on the job. One way 
to do it is through bargaining — getting 
protective clauses written into collective 
agreements. 

Joe Morris, executive vice-president of 
the Canadian Labour Congress, says 
there must be increased co-operation be- 
tween labour, management and govern- 
ment. 

Jack Dowling says there must be more 
uniformity in legislation across the coun- 
try. The job is to keep pushing safety 
through legislation, education and bar- 
gaining. 

Research and political action are two 
additional ways in which unions can 
help to reduce the toll. 



In the old days an injured workman 
had to take his employer to court. Em- 
ployers countered with the doctrine of 
"assumption of risk" — they claimed the 
worker was aware of any hazards when 
he agreed to work. 

It's a far cry from those bad old days 
to now, when some employees have won 
the right to refuse work which they con- 
sider unsafe, without penalty. 

The Steelworkers have won that kind 
of clause in a number of contracts, in- 
cluding a recent settlement at Grande 
Cache, Alberta, on behalf of 480 em- 
ployees of Mclntyre Porcupine Mines. 

But as long as over a thousand people 
die on the job every year, and many 
thousands more are maimed, disfigured, 
or suffer injuries to brains, organs and 
limbs, the fight has to go on. 

"There's not much use negotiating 
good contracts if workers get crippled 
and can't be on the job to enjoy the 
contract's benefits," says Mahoney. 



CLIC REPORT 

Continued from page 34 



l.ocal Cit> & State 



Local 
Union 
Contri- 
butions 

TEXAS 



Con- 
vention 
Contri- 
butions Total 



14 

198 

213 

324 

379 

411 

425 

526 

610 

622 

665 

753 

973 

977 

1066 

1097 

1104 

1226 

1266 

1334 

1565 

1634 

1751 

1822 

1855 

1884 

1971 

2007 

2121 

2572 

2713 

3106 



San Antonio 

Dallas 

Houston 

Waco 

Texarkana 

San Angelo 

El Paso 

Galveston 

Port Arthur 

Waco 

Amarillo 

Beaumont 

Texas City 

Wichita Falls 

Houston 

Longview 

Tyler 

Pasadena 

Austin 

Baytown 

Abilene 

Big Springs 

Austin 

Fort Worth 

Bryan 

Lubbock 

Temple 

Orange 

El Paso 

Wichita Falls 

Center 

San Antonio 



20.00 



22.00 



40.00 



10.00 



20.00 



10.00 
20.00 



95.00 


95.00 


80.00 


80.00 


60.00 


160.00 


20.00 


20.00 


30.00 


50.00 


20.00 


20.00 


10.00 


32.00 


20.00 


20.00 


15.00 


15.00 


20.00 


20.00 


10.00 


10.00 


40.00 


40.00 


40.00 


40.00 


15.00 


55.00 


20.00 


20.00 


10.00 


10.00 


15.00 


15.00 


30.00 


30.00 


20.00 


30.00 


30.00 


30.00 


20.00 


40.00 


10.00 


10.00 


20.00 


20.00 


60.00 


60.00 


20.00 


20.00 


40.00 


40.00 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 




10.00 


5.00 


25.00 


5.00 


5.00 


20.00 


20.00 



UTAH 

722 Salt Lake City 22.00 



VIRGINIA 



303 
319 
331 
388 
396 
1078 



Portsmouth 

Roanoke 

Norfolk 

Richmond 

Newport News 

Fredericksburg 



1402 Richmond 



43.94* 
40.00 



10.00 
10.00 
35.00 
25.00 
10.00 
10.00 
20.00 



22.00 



10.00 
10.00 
35.00 
25.00 
10.00 
53.94 
60.00 



Local City & State 

1534 Petersburg 

1665 Alexandria 

1729 Charlottesville 

2033 Front Royal 

2070 Roanoke 



Local 
Union 
Contri- 
butions 



33.68* 



33.68* 



Con- 
vention 
Contri- 
butions Total 

20.00 20.00 

20.00 53.68 

10.00 10.00 

10.00 43.68 

10.00 10.00 



WASHLNGTON 



317 
770 
870 
1136 
1225 
1230 
1289 
1689 
1845 
2396 
2498 
2519 
2536 
2628 
2633 
2637 
2659 
2739 
2761 
2767 
2805 
2841 
2894 
2935 
3023 
3009 
3119 



Aberdeen 24.00 

Yakima 50.00 

Spokane 20.00 

Kettle Falls 

Ardenvior 

Cashmere 

Seattle 80.00 

Tacoma 7.00 

Snoqualmie Fall 

Seattle 10.00 

Longview 

Seattle 

Port Gamble 

Centralia 

Tacoma 

Sedro Wolley 

Everett 

Yakima 

McCleary 

Morton 

Klickitat 

Peshastin 

Twisp 

Creston 

Omak 

Aberdeen 

Tacoma 



30.00 
10.00 
10.00 
20.00 



50.00 

35.00 
30.00 
10.00 
15.00 
50.00 
10.00 
20.00 
5.00 
5.00 
10.00 
45.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
50.00 
10.00 
10.00 



WEST VIRGINIA 



3 Wheelinc 25.00 

128 St. Albans 
1207 Charleston 
1574 Weirton 
1755 Parkersburg 
2430 Charleston 

WISCONSIN 

849 Mam'towoc 20.00 

1074 Eau Claire 29.00 

2283 West Bend 3.00 



10.00 
20.00 
10.00 
20.00 
20.00 
10.00 



1564 Casper 



WYOMING 

93.00 



24.00 
50.00 
50.00 
10.00 
10.00 
20.00 
80.00 
7.00 
50.00 
10.00 
35.00 
30.00 
10.00 
15.00 
50.00 
10.00 
20.00 
5.00 
5.00 
10.00 
45.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
50.00 
10.00 
10.00 



35.00 
20.00 
10.00 
20.00 
20.00 
10.00 



20.00 

29.00 

3.00 



93.00 



*This includes the 1% payroll deduction 
of the fulltime Officers and Business Repre- 
sentatives. 

Recent Group Contributions 

Second District Seminar — (Feb- 
ruary) 1,405.00 

Massachusetts State Council Con- 
vention — (April) 2.125.00 

Western Council of Lumber, Pro- 
duction and Industrial Workers — 
(April) 2,015.00 

Oregon State Council Convention 1,095.00 

Omitted 72 CLIC Reports 

In the April issue of The Carpenter 

we published a report of contributions 
made to CLIC during 1972. We regret 
to report that we inadvertantly omitted 
some donations in this listing. These in- 
cluded: 

Local 893, Spring Lake, Michigan, 
which donated $40.00 at the Michigan 
State Convention. 

Local 122, Philadelphia, Pa., for 
$360.00. 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



Merry-Go-Rounds 

Continued from page 1 1 

Steam engines and, later, by elec- 
tricity, making it possible to create 
very elaborate carousels. 

In the great days of merry-go- 
round making there were four main 
centers of production — Kansas, 
Philadelphia. Brooklyn and North 
Tonawanda, New York. Some of 
the major producers of merry-go- 
rounds were C. W. Parker in the 
Midwest and Armitage-Herschell in 
upstate New York, competing with 
C. W. F. Dare of Brooklyn for the 
market in portable merry-go-rounds. 
Dentzel, in the Germantown section 
of Philadelphia, and the Philadel- 
phia Toboggan Company produced 
many fine carvings, as did the shops 
in Coney Island, such as M. C. 
Illions, Stein & Goldstein and 
George Carmel. 

The finished products emerging 
from the carving shops were beau- 
tiful to behold. Each horse was 
original and unique. 

The lead horse might be covered 
with garlands of roses, as though 
it had just pranced to a finish at the 
Kentucky Derby. An armored horse 
might carry a sword and shield. 
Some were decorated with rabbits 
or pheasants slung over the back 
of a saddle, as if returning from the 
hunt. Compared to American 
horses, carousel horses in Europe 
look like gentle park ponies. In 
fact, one carver, it is reported, de- 
livered realistically well-endowed 
stallions to a customer he wished to 
embarrass. 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 

Audel, Theodore 39 

Chevrolet 13 

Chicago Technical College 27 

Craftsman Book Co 14 

DeSoto Tool Co 28 

Eliason Stair Gauge Co 35 

Estwing Manufacturing 29 

Foley Manufacturing 37 

Fugilt Enterprises 28 

Irwin Auger Bit Co 31 

Lee, H. D 31 

Locksmithing Institute 35 

Paneling Specialties Co 39 

Stanley Tools Back Cover 



Imaginative carvers soon started 
outdoing each other with one crea- 
tion more dramatic than the last. 
They designed horses that would 
have pleased King Arthur's boldest 
knight and steeds for mythological 
gods. A carved tiger skin, complete 
with head, became a unique saddle, 
and a wooden bedroll was carved 
with fruit flowing from it. Elabo- 
rately scrolled chariots included 
figureheads of voluptuous mermaids 
and bathing beauties. A patriotic 
figure of the mythical Columbia was 
popular during World War I. 
Though the merry-go-rounds offered 
all kinds of animals to ride upon — 
lions, elephants, ostriches, even giant 
roosters — the magnificent horses 
were still the favorites. 

Though often treated as such, 
carousel carvings do not really 
qualify as folk art in the true sense. 
They were carved by skilled crafts- 
men on a commercial basis with 
assembly-line precision. Some men 
roughed out the bodies while others 
completed the legs. The most skilled 
carver of all was entrusted to com- 
plete the heads. 

With the Depression of the 
1930's, the golden age of merry- 
go-rounds came to an end. Amuse- 
ment parks closed. By the time bus- 
iness revived after World War II, 
carving wooden horses was no 
longer profitable, and aluminum 
horses were used more and more. 
Whether they are considered true 
folk art or simply a well-made prod- 
uct, these magnificent carved fig- 
ures have provided hours of enter- 
tainment and whimsical beauty for 
generations of Americans. ■ 



LAKELAND MEMORIAM 

Peter D. Sundberg, of Local 1, Clii- 
cago, 111., died March 4, 1973. Burial 
was in Chicago. 

• 
Fred Thelin, of Local 769. Pasa- 
dena, California, died March 9, 1973. 
Burial was in Jamestown, N.Y. 
• 
Gust Johnson, of Local 1590. Wash- 
ington. D.C., died March 10. 1973. He 
was buried in the Home Cemetery. 
• 
A ttend your local union meetings 
regularly. Be an active member of 
the United Brotherhood of Carpen- 
ters and Joiners of America. Partici- 
pate in its year-round activities. 




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MAY, 1973 



39 



IN CONCLUSION 



WHO'S ON FIRST? 
WHO'S ON 
SECOND? 

The Long, Weary Hassle for 

Repeal of Restrictions Against 

On-Site Picketing in the 

Construction Industry 



■ For a quarter of a century the building tradesman 
of the United States who carries a union card has been 
a second-class citizen in his dealings with management. 

Since shortly after passage of the Taft-Hartley Law 
in 1947, he has been forced to work beside non-union 
construction workers, otherwise known as "free 
riders," whether he liked it or not. His right to protest 
unfair working conditions at the job site has been 
sorely restricted. 

In April, 1949, only 20 months after passage of 
Taft-Hartley, the National Labor Relations Board 
rendered a decision in the Denver Building Trades 
Case which denied to Building Trades unions the same 
right to peacefully picket at their employment site as 
is now accorded unions in other industries in a labor 
dispute. 

The NLRB had no previous experience with the 
building and construction industry, because it had not 
taken jurisdiction prior to Taft-Hartley, when the 
Wagner Act was in effect. There was no testimony 
offered at the Congressional hearings on Taft-Hartley 
by any witness proving any public need for the pro- 
hibition of picketing of unfair construction jobs or the 
refusal of union men to work side-by-side with non- 
union men on such construction jobs. 

Nevertheless, the ill-conceived Denver Building 
Trades decision, based on a technicality in the law and 
a misinterpretation of Section 8(b)(4) of the Taft- 
Hartley Act, has denied Building Trades unions their 
Constitutional right to protest at a job site for the 
ensuing 24 years. It still throws up a barrier at every 
construction site in the United States today. 

Last month, the Building Trades Legislative Con- 
ference in Washington made repeal of Situs Picketing 
restrictions the number-one priority of 1973. 

Building Trades Secretary-Treasurer Bob Georgine 
told delegates: "We are going to accelerate our efforts 
to get a situs picketing bill adopted by Congress . . . 



We believe that the unfair state of the law on this 
point has benefited unfair contractors who are intent 
on busting the unions in the building and construction 
industry." 

With this statement we firmly agree. 

So, we are prepared to renew the valiant effort to 
get a situs picketing bill through Congress. 

Our experience to date reads like the temperature 
chart at the foot of a sick bed. House and Senate bills 
have run up and down the legislative charts hke re- 
curring fever — into committee, out of committee, un- 
der scrutiny in House and Senate hearings, statements 
from the White House, amendments, executive sessions 
of committees, and much more. Each time situs picket- 
ing bills started well, only to get bogged down some- 
where in the legislative maze. 

At one time a situs picketing bill actually was 
scheduled for floor action, only to be withdrawn 
through political chicanery. Former Speaker John Mc- 
Cormack had scheduled the bill for floor action on 
May 12, 1966. However, on May 1 1 the bill was with- 
drawn from the agenda, in a completely unprecedented 
move, at the request of the then Chairman of the 
House Labor Committee, Congressman Adam Clayton 
Powell. 

In this instance, as in far too many instances before 
and since, there have been moves by certain Congress- 
men and Senators to hold up action in their particular 
branches of the Congress "until the other branch acts 
first." 

Situs picketing legislative action becomes like the old 
Abbott and Costello routine of "Who's on first? Who's 
on second?" 

America's hard-working Building Tradesmen, who 
deserve better treatment, wind up back at home plate 
waiting for the next ballgame. 

It appears to us that some Congressmen do not yet 
want to go on record in support of Section 8(b)(4) 
repeal, in spite of the fact that every President of the 
United States since passage of the measure in 1947 
has called for redress of the oppressive secondary boy- 
cott provisions of Taft-Hartley. 

The misunderstandings about situs picketing circu- 
lated on Capitol Hill by the enemies of organized labor 
and special interest groups must be corrected, if we 
are ever to achieve success with situs picketing legis- 
lation. 

This is one of the jobs delegates to the recent Build- 
ing Trades Legislative Conference set out to do while 
they were in Washington last month. I have no idea 
how many delegates to this conference actually took 
the time to visit their home-state Congressmen and 
Senators to urge support of the number-one legisla- 
tive priority and the current situs picketing bills, but 
I'm afraid the job was not done as effectively as it 
could have been done. 

Two bills are now before Congress to remedy the 
quarter-century-old mistake of the NLRB and amend 
Taft-Hartley — H.R. 4726, introduced by Congressman 
Frank Thompson of New Jersey and co-sponsored by 
Congressman Carl Perkins of Kentucky, and S. 1238, 
sponsored by Senator Harrison Williams of New Jer- 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



sey. Both of these bills will require a concerted and 
unusual lobbying effort, if they are ever to get out of 
committee, onto the floor, and into the White House. 

After 25 years of failure, some Building Tradesmen 
seem to have given up the fight for legislative relief. I 
urge the veteran legislative advocates of the Building 
Trades to renew their efforts now. Join this new 
generation of labor spokesmen in a continuing fight 
for success. 

It took years for organized labor to achieve a mini- 
mum wage law, job safety laws, and health and wel- 
fare legislation. We must not give up the fight, in this 
case, until our second-class citizenship status is 
changed. 

Former Secretary of Labor Arthur Goldberg stated 
the purpose of situs picketing bills clearly and simply: 
"to do equity — to restore to unions in the building and 
construction industry the right to engage in peaceful 
activity at a common construction site, to protest sub- 
standard conditions maintained by any one of the con- 
struction contractors working at the very same site." 

The unique relationships between contractors and 
subcontractors and similar entities within the garment 
industry have already been fully recognized by a 1959 
amendment to Section 8(b) (4) of the Act. The current 
bills before Congress would do no more than apply 
similar principles to the construction industry, where 
job site relationships between employers jointly en- 
gaged in construction are highly comparable to those 
of the garment industry. 

There is solid legislative history supporting pro- 
posals to correct this injustice by reversing the Denver 
Building Trades rule. Situs picketing bills are the prod- 
uct of a growing consensus among members of both 
political parties in the Congress who are intimately 
familiar with the inequitable situation brought about 
by the Denver case, and who are, consequently aware 
of the need to eliminate situs picketing at construction 
sites from the definition of secondary boycotts in the 
National Labor Relations Act, as amended. It imple- 
ments recommendations which have been offered by 
four Presidents: Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and 
Johnson. President Nixon has also indicated his sup- 
port for the principle of common situs picketing. 

Construction work is a team effort of carpenters, 
electricians, plumbers, and many other skilled crafts- 
men. It will always be so. 

The right to demonstrate is labor's traditional and 
democratic way of expressing dissatisfaction with 
wages and working conditions. 

The only effective protest or action in the Building 
Trades is at the job site. Inevitably, there will be times 
when one group of craftsmen will want to walk off in 
protest when other groups will not. 

Even the late Senator Robert Taft, who co-authored 
Taft-Hartley, admitted that the Congress had not con- 
sidered the unique labor-management problems of the 
construction industry when the Act was written and 
acted upon. He had this to say in 1953 during hearings 
on proposed amendments to Taft-Hartley: "We did 



not in any way change the definition of interstate com- 
merce when we amended the Wagner Act to be the 
Taft-Hartley Law. I certainly was under the impression 
that during the consideration in 1947 that we were not 
dealing fundamentally with Building Trades." 

Whether the resulting difficulties engendered by the 
Denver Building Trades Case were the result of an 
oversight or a deliberate attempt to deny rights to the 
Building Trades, passage of the current bills are a clear 
cut necessity. 

Samuel Gompers once said, "The labor movement 
does not act upon formulas or philosophies. It seeks a 
practical answer to an urgent need." 

As I told Brotherhood delegates to the recent 
Building Trades Legislative Conference, the major 
threat facing construction unions is big open-shop 
firms with computerized data at their fingertips which 
can bury us with "scab" competition. The only way we 
can beat this unfair competition is by democratic 
protest at the job site. 

Let's overcome the "who's on first" business in this 
session of Congress and get this long overdue legisla- 
tion passed. It's time our legislative friends stood up to 
be counted on this vital issue. ■ 




GENERAL PRESIDENT 



What maks the 
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your kmd of hammer? 




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a safer hammer. Rim- into the handle hole under on the claw. This makes it hammer. Set it on its claws and 

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helps you do things right 




Official-Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA. FOUNDED 1881 




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GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Herbert C. Skinner 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

William Konyha 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D.C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 
Charles E. Nichols 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Patrick J. Campbell 

130 North Main Street 

New City, Rockland Co., New York 

10956 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

130 Mountain Avenue 
Springfield, New Jersey 07081 

Tliird District, Anthony Ochocki 
18400 Grand River Avenue, 
Detroit, Michigan 48223 

Fourth District, Harold E. Lewis 
2970 Peachtree Rd., N.W., Suite 300 
Atlanta, Ga. 30305 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
2800 Selkirk Drive 
Bumsville, Minn. 55378 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 
Glenbrook Center West — Suite 501 
1140 N.W. 63rd Street 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73116 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, M. B. Bryant 
Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, WiLLL\M Stefanovitch 

2418 Central Avenue 

Windsor, Ontario, Canada 

Tenth District, Eldon T. Staley 

4706 W. Saanich Rd. 

RR #3, Victoria, B. C. 




William Sidell, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

If your local union wishes to list de- 
ceased members in the "In Memoriam" 
page of The Carpenter, it is necessary 
that a specific request be directed to the 
editor. 



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a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
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Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. Members who die or are sus- 
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the mailing iiat of The Carpenter. 



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(§ZI\[S[? 




ii LABOR PRESS it 




VOLUME XCIII NO. 5 JUNE, 1973 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Building Trades Face Life-Death Challenge Dan Kauffman 2 

Union Acres: Local Effort Provides Housing in Texas 4 

Gas Scarcer, Costlier: How to Save It Sidney Margolius 7 

Indiana Apprentices Create Grist Mill for Festival 8 

Halifax Member Builds House of Bottles 13 

Wood Framing Could Ease Energy Crisis, Says Report 39 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 6 

Canadian Report Morden Lazarus 1 1 

CLIC Report ;..„ 14 

Plane Gossip 16 

Service to the Brotherhood 17 

We Congratulate 25 

Local Union News 26 

Apprenticeship and Training 32 

Your Union Dictionary, No. 18 36 

In Memoriam 37 

In Conclusion William Sidell 40 



POSTMASTERS, ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published nnonthly at 310 Rhode Island Ave., N.E., Washington, 0. C. 20CI8, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington. 
0. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single'copies 20« in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

The majestic beauty of Grand Can- 
yon National Park in Arizona as 
seen from a high point on Bright 
Angel Trail is our cover subject for 
June. 

Farther down the trail, tourists 
trudge the pack horse route which 
runs across a suspension bridge, over 
the roaring Colorado River, up Bright 
Angel Canyon, and on to the far rim 
of the Grand Canyon itself. 

It's a spectacular journey, and thou- 
sands of tourists climb the trail each 
year. 

Grand Canyon National Park was 
created by Congress in 1919. It em- 
braces 1,009 square miles of towers, 
buttes, terraces, platforms, natural 
amphitheatres and other scenic won- 
ders. 

The canyon ranges in width from 
4 to 18 miles; its greatest depths lie 
more than a mile below its rim. It 
extends in a winding course from the 
head of Marble Gorge, near the 
northern Arizona boundary, to Grand 
Wash Cliffs near the Nevada line, a 
distance of about 280 miles. 

NOTE: Readers who would like copies 
of this corcr iininaned by a inciiliiii; label 
may obtain them by sending 10<t- in coin 
to cover mailing costs to the Editor, The 
CARPENTER, 101 Constitution Ave., 
N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001. 



CARPENTER 




The Louisville Story 















Building Trades Face Life-Death 
Challenge From Open Shoppers 



A-B-C means 

anti-union to the 

construction worker. 

"Organized labor 

is not going to 

take this lightly/' 

Building Trades 

leader tells 

newspaper reporter. 

"We have just 

begun to fight!" 



By Dan Kauffman 

Editor's Note: The author is a staff cor- 
respondent for the Louisville, Ky., Cou- 
rier-Journal, and the following are ex- 
cerpts from a Coinier-Joiirtial article. 

B It's an old worn-out war — the 
one between unions and non-union 
contractors. For years, tlie union 
shops generally did the big jobs 
downtown; the open shops did 
houses, apartments and some of the 
commercial construction in the 
suburbs. 

But in the last couple of years 
that division has been increasingly 
challenged by non-union contrac- 
tors. Nationally such challenges re- 
sulted in a few pitched battles as 
open shop contractors became able 
to low bid jobs that were previously 
considered the domain of union con- 
tractors. 

Now. in Louisville, a group of 
Kentucky contractors say they are 
determined to bring the challenge 
here. 

Union contractors are those who 
use only union labor in all phases of 
their work. A non-union, or open 
shop, contractor accomplishes most 
of his work with non-union workers 
but on occasion may subcontract to 
a union firm or induce union mem- 
bers to work for him temporarily. 

Last year, C. T. Love, president 
of a small Louisville general con- 
tracting firm, got together with six 



other area contractors and formed 
the Kentuckiana chapter of the 
Associated Builders and Contrac- 
tors (ABC), a national association 
of open shop contractors. Love was 
elected president of the local chap- 
ter. 

Since that time the chapter, which 
covers all of Kentucky and Southern 
Indiana, has grown to 65 members 
who have separate contracts for 
more than $30 million worth of 
construction, according to the local 
chapter's executive director, Donald 
Harrington. 

Harrington said the chapter hopes 
to have close to 100 members 
in the next few months. "Soon 
as we reach the 100-125 member- 
ship level some of the big guys will 
be willing to take a look at us," he 
said. "Then maybe we can get some 
of the riverfront development, which 
will mean we'll experience tremen- 
dous growth." 

Non-union Share 

No statistics, either national or 
local, are available to show what 
percentage of construction contracts 
are going to non-union contrac- 
tors. But it is an undeniable fact 
that their share is growing, probably 
because they can often build a 
project for less than union firms. 

Some published reports estimate 
that in the last three to four years 



THE CARPENTER 



more than $10 billion worth of con- 
struction work which would have 
formerly been considered union has 
gone non-union and that last year 
32% of all construction, nationally, 
went to open shop contractors. 

Maurice Mosier, vice-president of 
the Washington, D.C.-based Nation- 
al Constructors Association, whose 
members are all multi-million dollar 
union construction firms, said, "We 
don't have any actual statistics, but 
we know we are losing a hell of a 
lot of work to open shop firms. 
We're finding that a lot of our firms 
are just doing the engineering and 
designing of buildings, and then 
open shops do the actual construc- 
tion. Before, our firms always did 
the complete job." 

Non-Union Comment 

Dave Gale, the president of the 
Georgia ABC chapter, said at one 
of the monthly meetings of the Ken- 
tuckiana chapter, "ABC members 
are enlisting in an army that is going 
to fight a long war against an enemy 
that is trying to destroy free enter- 
prise in this country. The enemy is 
varied but in the frontline are those 
with the union label and right be- 
hind them is the Federal Govern- 
ment." 

Gale, a man who believes in the 
hard sell, told local ABC members 
that he went non-union in 1970. He 
said, "I started having problems 
with the union and they came to me 
and said, 'You can finish the jobs 
you are doing with non-union help. 
but the next job you start will em- 
ploy only union members.' And I 

said, 'Will you kiss my and get 

out of here?" 1 can tell you it will be 
Dave Gale's pizza parlor before I 
take those guys on as business 
partners again." 

And tough talk is coming from, 
the old union war horses as well. 

Rip Cochrane, head of the Build- 
ing Trades Council in Louisville 
said, "The vast majority of these 
contractors that have signed up with 
ABC do not have the competence 
or the skilled labor to put up major 



projects. Besides, most of them 
couldn't get bonding for anything 
over $350,000. But'l can tell you 
one thing, organized labor in Louis- 
ville is not going to take this light- 
ly. We have just begun to fight." 

Cochrane said the unions" fight 
will start with Icafleting and picket- 



ABC Opens P.R. Campaign 
Against Building Trades 

President Frank Bonadio of the 
AFL-ClO's Building and Construc- 
tion Trades Department has lab- 
eled as "absurd" a charge by open 
shop contractors of "a conspiracy 
of violence and coercion" aimed 
at driving them out of business. 

"Any allegations that we are 
or have been, involved in a con- 
spiracy of any type is utterly ab- 
surd." he said. 

Bonadio noted that charges, an- 
nounced at a press conference by 
the open shop Associated Builders 
and Contractors, had not been sub- 
mitted to the building trades 
unions. 

"We have no idea of the spe- 
cifics of the ABC charges except 
what we have heard through the 
newspapers." he said. "The matter 
has been referred to our counsel 
for study." 

The charges were filed with the 
National Labor Relations Board 
seeking "an immediate nationwide 
injunction" against 17 AFL-CIO 
building 'trades unions. The unaf- 
filiated Teamsters Union was not 
included in the charges. 

ABC established a public rela- 
tions office here several months 
ago with the not-too-secret objec- 
tive of building a picture that 
building trades unions were en- 
gaged in violence in fighting ABC 
contractors. 

However, some of the roughest 
reports of violence have been 
against the union building trades- 
men. Recently, a member of the 
Painters Union was killed in West 
Virginia while peacefully walking 
on a picketline. 

Building trades unions see the 
growth of open shoppers as a 
prime threat to th'e wages and 
working standards they have built 
up over the years. (PAI) 



ing of job sites. 

Love, the Louisville contractor 
who is the president of the local 
chapter of ABC, said such tactics 
won't faze him. 

"The union just doesn't scare us. 
The only thing they have going for 
them is one big bluff (picketing)," 
he said. 

"When I started to build my of- 
fice the union called up and said 
they were going to throw a picket 
around us. I said, 'Fine, put it right 
there. I can't think of a better ad- 
vertisement than for you to be on 
the picketline with my building 
going up in the air right in the mid- 
dle of you'." 

Picketing Problems 

But, Love admitted, "The one big 
problem with picket lines is getting 
concrete to your job. If you don't 
have concrete when you need it, 
you're dead. The Teamsters just 
won't drive their cement trucks 
across picket lines. But hell, in an- 
other year we'll have 150 members 
and we'll be big enough to buy our 
own concrete firm as a joint ven- 
ture." 

But Pete Koenig, a Louisville 
plumbing contractor, says the union 
provides him with advantages. He 
noted. "Sure. I'm management so 
I'm more or less fighting with them 
all the time trying to hold the wage 
scale down. But when I hire a man 
off the street, I don't know what 
I'm getting. When I hire a union 
man I don't have to worry about 
him being qualified." 

Koenig also notes another im- 
portant advantage of being union. 
"1 can cater to work in union fac- 
tories, where non-union contractors 
could never go," he said. 

Cochrane contends that "with- 
out competent building tradesmen 
in this area the contractors would 
have serious difficulties getting their 
jobs done. Take Mr. Love, for in- 
stance — every job he has ever had 
has been dependent on union sub- 
contractors to get the job done." 
(PAI) ■ 



JUNE, 1973 



union 
acres 




Local eflFort provides housing in Texas for 
members of Brotherhood industrial union 



■ When the E. L. Bruce Com- 
pany, well-established, old-line wood 
manufacturing firm of Tennessee, 
opened a plant in the piney woods 
of East Texas a little more than 
several years ago, people came from 
miles around to take jobs on the 
production lines. 

They came from dairy farms and 
from crossroad communities all over 
Shelby county and beyond. Center, 
Texas, site of the new plant, was a 
busy hub of the Southwest poultry 
marketing industry, and lumbering 
brings a steady source of income. 

Housing in the town was limited, 
and new Bruce employees some- 
times drove more than 30 miles each 
way to work. 

Soon after the Brotherhood's Lo- 
cal 2713-S was organized and the 
first contract with the company was 
negotiated, local union officers be- 
gan considering the special problems 
of housing for its members. 

They eventually discussed the 
matter with a representative of the 
Federal Housing Administration of- 
fice in Houston and drew up plans 
and application forms to create a 
complete community, near the Bruce 



Bobby Bolton, administrator and prime mover of Union Acres, shonu at left in the picture below, discusses the development's prog- 
ress with International Representative Max Churchman, Southwest Regional Organizing Director Gervis Simmons, and a Union 
Acres maintenance superintendent. They stand outside the Union Acres offices and daj-care center. 




THE CARPENTER 



plant, with initial costs underwritten 
by an FHA appropriation for rent- 
supplement housing. Under the 
now-defunct FHA-Office of Eco- 
nomic Opportunity rent supplement 
program, the Federal government 
assisted almost 100% in design, 
financing, and in establishing the 
guidelines for Union Acres, as the 
development was named. 

At first there was strong opposi- 
tion from town officials at Center 
to the housing plan. All manner of 
technicalities were used to delay ini- 
tial construction. It was to be an 
integrated Community — an innova- 
tion for the town. 

Eventually, however, city fathers, 
saw the advantages of the new com- 
munity. With Bruce wages being 
spent right in Center, instead of in 
farflung towns, Center would pros- 
per. 

Union Acres was built on an 
18.3 acre site, with 100 units erect- 
ed on approximately half of the 
land, with the remainder left for 
future development. There is an 
automatic laundry, a complete day- 
care center, operated with Federal 
funds and the assistance of the 
Shelby County School Board, plenty 
of parking space, paved streets, and 
connecting sidewalks. Union Acres 
today is a showplace of the commu- 
nity. 

More than a third of the residents 
are union members — either mem- 
bers of Local 2713-S or of a local 
union of the Amalgamated Meat 
Cutters and Butcher Workmens 
Union, employed in the poultry 
marketing centers. Approximately 
15% of the residents are white, and 
85% are black. 

Manager of Union Acres is af- 
fable, busy Bobby Bolton, president 
of the local union. He is assisted by 
Office Secretary Eldred Clark, a 
former steward in the Bruce plant. 

In an area where housing units 
rent for an average of $130 a 
month, Union Acres residents pay 
only $60, thanks to the Federal gov- 
ernment's rent supplement program. 

Union Acres is establishing its 
own credit union. It is functioning 
as a democratic, orderly community 
. . . because of the foresight of a 
local union of the United Brother- 
hood. ■ 




The 100 housing units at Union Acres are interconnected by a full network of side- 
walks. Open spaces and native pine trees add to the beauty of the development. 




Brotherhood members produce parquet flooring at the Bruce Company plant near 
Union Acres. Many Bruce employees are residents of the FHA-rent-supplement hous- 
ing development. 




The water tower and smoke stack of the Bruce Company plant are easily seen from 
the business office of Union Acres. Though employer and employees live in close 
proximity, there is no "company-store paternalism" in the relationship. 



JUNE, 1973 





TOM ROUNDUP 



PENSION PLAN PROTECTION— Congressman Lloyd Meeds (D-Wash. ) has called for passage 
of Federal legislation to assure that employees will know how their pension plans 
are being administered and will receive benefits when due. 

The legislation backed by Meeds would force a full disclosure of pension 
assets, transactions, and liabilities. Restrictions placed on pension fund admin- 
istrators would bar them from managing the plans for their own gain or for pur- 
poses not in the best interests of the participants. Employees could sue pension 
plan administrators for breach of responsibility. Meeds suggested that curbs be 
placed on the amount of company stock a company could buy for its own pension 
plan. 

HOW'S THAT AGAIN?— Bound to go down in the history books as an immortal quote — 
alongside Calvin Coolidge's profound conclusion that "When you have many people :'^ 
out of work you have unemployment" — is the recent comment by Herbert Stein, chair- -^ 
man of President Uixon's Council of Economic Advisers, who was asked about the 
rampant inflation victimizing the country. Said Stein, "Things are unclear, 
and attempts to impose clarity on the situation distort the facts." 

DISABILITY HITS BREADWINNERS-One of almost eight family heads suffered from enough 
health disability during 1970 to hinder them on the job and lower their incomes, 
according to the 1970 Census. 

This showed that of the 44,000,000 family heads of working age--18 to 64— 
there were 3,600,000 who suffered from partial disability while 1,600,000 were 
completely disabled when the Census was taken. 

Disability was reflected in family incomes. Median income of families headed 
by a well person was $10,601; that for those with partial disability was $9,128 
while that for complete disability was S4,666. 

NEW WORKERS — The Labor Department reports that the young men and women born in 

the post World War II baby boom are out of school now and moving into the 25 to 

34-year old work force at a rate of 1.2 million a year. They will number 18.5 
million by 1980. 

TEA LEAVES TELL — President Nixon, speaking to a nationwide television audience 
recently, denounced a federal appropriation far tea-tasting and implied that he 
would kill off the tea-tasting commission as a terrible waste of taxpayers' money. 
It may have won Wixon some votes, but, instead of killing the commission, Nixon 
has increased its appropriation. For tea-tasting in 1972 the Nixon Administration 
spent $167,250. For 1973 the Nixon Administration will be spending $173,250 for 
tea-tasting; and for 1974 the Nixon Administration is asking — yes, for tea-tasting 
again— $178,250. 

PAY ADVISORY BOARD — The AFL-CIO is maintaining its membership on the Labor-Manage- 
ment Advisory Committee for the present as a way of making known to the Nixon Ad- 
ministration and to industry how it feels about wage-price inequity. 

The AFL-CIO Executive Council has indignantly described the inequities that 
have been built into the Cost of Living Council, but AFL-CIO President George 
Meany pointed out that the Advisory body represents the only place within the gov- 
ernmental structure where it can make its position clear. 

"We're going to continue to hold membership on the Advisory board," Meany 
told newsmen. "It hasn't given much advice to date, but it still represents a 
place where we can let the Administration and the other members of the Advisory 
Board from industry know how we feel. For the time being, we're going to cer- 
tainly continue." 

6 THE CARPENTER 



GAS SCARCER. COSTLIER 




Editor's Note: We suggest that you 
also read General President Sidell's 
comments on the energy crisis, Page 40. 

By SIDNEY MARGOLIUS 

■ Even with the summer driving 
season ahead, service stations in 
some parts of the country already 
are rationing gas by such methods 
as limiting how much you can buy, 
limiting hours of sale, and so on. 
At the same time, prices have been 
increased. 

If you own a big car loaded with 
accessories, and drive the typical 
12,000 miles a year, you can figure 
that you may use 1,000 gallons 
a year at an annual cost in the 
neighborhood of $400. A combina- 
tion of higher prices and reduced 
mileage can well cost you another 
$50 this year. 

There's also a hidden price in- 
crease. Independent marketers who 
sell unadvertised or house brands at 
cut rates have found it especially 
hard to get supplies. Over 300 in- 
dependent retailers were reported 
shut down by early May. 

Several reasons have been offered 
for the shortage, with some indica- 
tion that it may be partly artificially 
induced. The Consumer Federation 
of America has pointed out that in- 
dependent refiners are operating at 
only part capacity. They could pro- 
duce more gas, if the large oil com- 
panies made available more supplies 
of crude oil. 

But there is no doubt that more 
conservative use of gas by car 
owners could help restrain their 
own operating costs and the nation's 
trade deficit. Almost one-third of 
our oil now is imported. In recent 
years, with the encouragement of 
car manufacturers and oil com- 
panies both, we've gone on a real 
gas-swigging binge. While consump- 
tion of heating oil has gone up 18% 



How to Save It 



in the past ten years, gasoline use 
has jumped 50%. 

The unexpectedly huge increase 
in consumption is due not only to 
the greater number of cars but to 
the emission-control devices on new 
models and use of more accessories 
such as air conditioning and power- 
assisted controls. 

But even with more accessories, 
most car owners can reduce con- 
sumption. Here's how: 

Fuel-saving starts with the car. 

Both the weight of the car and the 
size of the engine affect consump- 
tion. Other factors equal, a 3000- 
pound car may get 30-40% more 
mileage than one weighing 4,000. 

Bigger engines also play a part. 
A recent government study found, 
as one of several examples, that a 
1973 3,500-pound Plymouth Vali- 
ant with a 198-cubic inch engine 
got about 18 miles to the gallon. 
A 4,500-pound Plymouth Satellite 
with a 400-cubic inch engine got 
only eight miles. A 2,750-pound 
Chevrolet Vega with a 140-cubic 
engine got 21.5 mpg. A 5,000- 
pound Chevrolet Suburban with a 
350-cubic inch engine got only a 
little over seven. 

Most of the full-size station 
wagons proved to be big gas eaters 
with 7 to 8 mpg. Even most of 
the current-model full-size standard 
cars now provide only about 9 to 
10 mpg. Intermediates provide 
about 10 to 13 mpg, and the com- 
pacts, about 18 to 22. 

Tires are another factor. Radial 
tires save about 10% of gas but 
you need them all around. You 
can't mix radials and bias-ply tires. 
But any tires get more gas mileage 



fully inflated. Five pounds of un- 
derinflation wastes a half gallon of 
every 20 gallons. 

"Tire drag" also reduces mileage. 
A wheel out of alignment (toeing in 
or out) by one degree increases 
drag about 8%. (Poor alignment 
also damages tires and increases 
steering hazard.) 

So are driving habits. Besides re- 
ducing unnecessary gas use as 
through consolidating errands and 
using carpools and public transpor- 
tation when feasible, improving 
driving habits is the simplest way 
to get more mileage. Jack-rabbit 
starts, driving unnecessarily in low 
gear, racing for the red light and 
hard braking rather than gradual 
deceleration all consume more gas. 
So does longidling while you run 
into a store, or wait for your wife. 
Keeping an even speed helps take 
advantage of momentum. If you 
have air conditioning, don't use it 
unnecessarily. Mileage drops espe- 
cially sharply over 40 mph. If you 
get 18 mpg at 40, you can expect 
only 16 at 50 and 14 at 60. In 
general, you can expect fuel costs to 
increase about 33% more at 70 
than at 50. 

And poorly-tuned engines. Poor- 
ly-tuned engines with carburetor 
misadjustments and late ignition 
timing are common causes of un- 
due gas consumption. A dirty air 
filter can cut mileage 10%. A slow- 
acting or stuck choke; engine idle 
set too high (but it needs to be high 
enough to prevent stalling); drag- 
ging brakes; faulty spark plugs; 
stuck heat control or thermostatic 
valve; too-thick motor oil — all re- 
duce mileage. ■ 



JUNE, 1973 



B The ancient and respected skills 
of the millwright will be demonstrated 
June 30-July 8 on the Mall in Wash- 
ington, D.C., when the Smithsonian 
Institution presents its 1973 Festival 
of American Folklife. 

Brotherhood members will be as- 
sembling and disassembling a scale 
model of a waterpowered grist mill 
for the hundreds of thousands of 
spectators expected during the annual 
14-day festival. 

The model of the grist mill was 
built by apprentices of the Central 
and Western Indiana Carpenters Joint 
Apprenticeship School, as the accom- 
panying pictures show. The young 
men worked from copies of the ori- 
ginal plans of a waterwheel and mill 
built in 1774 on Crum Creek, Chester 
County, Pennsylvania. 

The mill will be displayed beside 
an exhibit of a modem steam turbine 
— graphically showing how millwrights 
have adapted their traditional skills to 
modern technology. | 







Indiana Apprentices Create 

Waterwlieel Powered Grist Mill 

for Folklore Festival 




THE CARPENTER 




1. Cassell Skinner and Instructor Ed 
Eaton, make an engineering check of 
the completed project. 



2. Apprentices James Lilly and Donald 
Strahl install gear wheel teeth. 



3. Jess Lowder, Ron Taylor, Gerry 
Stoffey, and Ronnie Kuntz install 
dowling and adjust the pillow block. 



4. John Tilford assembling main 
gear spokes. 




i • 




if*^ 



y. 



% 



5. Using the tools and techniques of a 
bygone day, David Truscher creates 
the main drive shaft for the mill. 



6. Gerry Soules drills a hole as he 
assembles the shaft mount. 



7. Coordinator Wendell Vandivier 
watches as apprentice Louie Oliver 
shaves down a spoke. 



8. Bill Smith and Steve Sutherlin make 
adjustments on the grinding wheel. 



9. Jess Lowder and Cassel Skinner 
check the engineering prints as the 
work progresses. 





JUNE, 1973 



SERVING THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY'S NEED FOR INFORMATION SINCE 1950. 



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10 



THE CARPENTER 




CANADIAN 
' T* REPORT 



Quebec Bill Would Eliminate Veto 
Power of CNTU in Contracts 



Quebec Labor Minister Jean Cour- 
noyer has introduced legislation which 
would eliminate the right of the Con- 
federation of National Trade Unions 
to veto future labor contracts nego- 
tiated with contractors' associations. 

The legislative bill is aimed at end- 
ing two decades of bloody construc- 
tion union wars by giving the Quebec 
Federation of Labor its rightful ma- 
jority position in dealing with con- 
tractors. 

For years, the CNTU and the QFL 
fought it out every fall for 40 days 
in an attempt to sign up as many 
members as possible before contract 
talks. The annual sign-up blitz, which 
has had legal sanction and supervision 
from the provincial government, has 
become known as "The raiding pe- 
riod." It has been marked at times 
by violence and bloodshed. 

The construction industry in Que- 
bec, which employs 120,000 workers 
at its summer peak, including thou- 
sands of members of the United 
Brotherhood, is a volitile and transient 
industry. It is also a key to the prov- 
ince's economic prosperity. 

During the last raiding period, No- 
vember, 1972, the QFL was so effec- 
tive in signing up workers that it in- 



creased its share of construction union 
members from about 65% to 80%. 

Some of the raiding activity has led 
to charges in the criminal courts, ac- 
cording to The Toronto Globe and 
Mail. 

The CNTU's share dropped from 
about 35% to 17%, and a new right- 
wing breakaway group from the left- 
ist CNTU took 3%. 

The CNTU then boycotted an 
agreement reached at the bargaining 
table between the QFL and five of 
the six contractors' association. 

Despite its minority position in rep- 
resenting workers, the CNTU still had 
veto power. 

Mr. Coumoyer's bill would take 
away that veto right "in the interests 
of the majority." Known as Bill No. 
9, the legislation would allow 50% 
of construction workers to approve 
province-wide construction labor con- 
tracts. 

At the present time, CNTU is left 
mostly with construction laborers, ac- 
cording to The Toronto Globe and 
Mail. The QFL has almost all the 
skilled workers — members of the 
United Brotherhood, plumbers, pipe- 
fitters, and mechanical equipment 
operators. 



Employment In Canada Increases; 
Business Making Good Recovery 



The unemployment picture is look- 
ing brighter but everyone is keeping 
his fingers crossed. After three years 
of rising joblessness, no one will say 
that full employment is just around 
the corner. 

Still this year is expected to be 
good for business. The corporation 
profits for the first quarter of the 
year were over 35% higher than a 
year ago. The biggest gains took place 
in real estate, paper, forest products, 
construction and materials, golds, base 
metals plus miscellaneous industries. 

At the end of the first quarter of 
the year, 8.7 million people were 



working. This was an increase of 3.4 
million over 1972. The seasonally 
adjusted rate of unemployment across 
Canada was 5.5%, down from 6.7% 
at the end of 1972. The heaviest 
unemployment was among young peo- 
ple. About 44% of unemployed were 
Canadians, 14 to 24 years of age. 

This modest improvement in em- 
ployment compares poorly with the 
increase in profits in many industries. 
The percentage increase in the con- 
struction materials industry was 129.7. 
In the paper and forest industry, it 
was 165.8%>, food processing 65.4%, 
real estate a whopping 1,275.0%. 



These increases in profits are on 
top of large increases last year — 25% 
in the fourth quarter, 16% the third 
quarter and 28% the first quarter. 

In other words, business has made 
a good recovery from depressed prof- 
its of 1970-1, but this recovery shows 
up only slightly in employment. 

Maybe better is to come. But no 
one is predicting unemployment rates 
below 5% this year on a national 
basis although, in some provinces, un- 
employment is below that figure. 

Manitoba unemployment was down 
4.5% and Ontario to 4.7%, the best 
in Canada. 

How Much to Tighten 
Nation's Economy? 

The federal government is con- 
cerned with the continued inflationary 
trend, but it has to move carefully 
on what action it takes in view of its 
past and sad experience. 

Four years ago it started dampen- 
ing down the economy — increasing in- 
terest rates, tightening up on money- 
lending and cutting back on construc- 
tion — but the results were near dis- 
astrous. It kept down costs but cre- 
ated heavy unemployment which has 
not yet been corrected. 

The Bank of Canada, which already 
gave warning that it may have to 
tighten up again, has in fact raised 
the bank rate of 5V4 % from 4%%. 
The chartered banks followed suit, 
raising their prime rates to 6V2 % 
from 6%. Mortgage money is also 
moving up again, high though it has 
been and is. 

Compulsory Auto 
Plan Saves in Manitoba 

Despite dire predictions of private 
insurance carriers, the first year's ex- 
perience of Autopac, the Manitoba 
government's compulsory auto insur- 
ance scheme, was a good one. 

Manitoba has reported an overall 
saving to motorists of about 15% on 
automobile insurance premiums. 

The province's Public Insurance 
Corporation received $37,9 million in 
premiums in its first year of opera- 
tions. Under private insurance, mo- 
torists would have paid out over $45 
million in premiums. 

The corporation showed a surplus 
of one and quarter million dollars on 
the year's business. Of this amount, 
one million dollars was set aside for 
unreported claims if any, and the 
balance goes into a stabilization fund. 
Continued on page 12 



JUNE, 1973 



11 



It is interesting that private insur- 
ance companies in provinces without 
public insurance again propose to 
raise their auto insurance rates. 

The province of British Columbia 
— also with an NDP government — is 
introducing public auto insurance ef- 
fecting March 1. 1974. 

The B.C. government has set up 
an Insurance Corporation of British 
Columbia to provide auto insurance 
at cost and to sell general insurance. 

Insurance Corporation could be- 
come one of Canada's largest insur- 
ance underwriters in a very few years. 

Improved Welfare 
Benefits Under Study 

Canada's patchwork system of so- 
cial security came under scrutiny last 
month at a federal-provincial confer- 
ence of welfare ministers. 

Federal Health and Welfare Minis- 
ter Marc Lalonde produced a three- 
tier 14 point program which met with 
general approval. 

The main features are improve- 
ments in family allowances, the Can- 
ada Pension Plan and in income sup- 
plements. 

If enacted, family allowances would 
go up from a present average of $7.21 



per child to $20. This won't be as 
large an increase as it seems because 
family allowances, now exempt, will 
be fully taxable. Nevertheless, aver- 
age net allowances will double, and 
all families with incomes below $50.- 
000 a year will get some benefit. The 
lower income groups will of course 
benefit most. 

Mr. Lalonde proposed that the ceil- 
ing on earnings on which Canada 
Pension Plan contributions are paid 
be raised from $5,600 to $7,800 a 
year by 1975. Most provinces thought 
that the ceiling and benefits should 
be even higher. 

Ontario wants the ceiling raised to 
$9,500 by 1976 and the monthly 
benefits raised from the present $125 
to $192. Mr. Lalonde suggested an 
increase to $160. 

But Ontario also urged that the 
CPP be paid at age 60 on a voluntary 
basis and at a reduced rate. 

Manitoba agreed to the lowering 
of the age at which pensions could be 
drawn, but wanted the early retire- 
ment pension paid at the full rate. 

The greatest interest centered 
around the guaranteed annual income 
proposal which would be paid to those 
who cannot or should not work. This 
got favorable acceptance with a strong 
recommendation that the g.a.i. also 



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be applied to the working poor. 

The increased family allowances 
will come into effect next year, the 
other proposals by 1975-6 barring the 
usual hazards of politics. 

Reports on Health 
Hazards Stir Parley 

Early in May the Canadian Labour 
Congress held its 8th Biennial Con- 
ference on Health and Safety. The 
deliberations included questions rang- 
ing from workmen's compensation to 
labor's role in promoting safety in the 
community. 

Perhaps no more important ques- 
tions were discussed than industrial 
diseases, and cancer and the worker, 
tied in with problems of pollution of 
the environment. This included the 
working environment. 

Just as this conference was con- 
vening, unionists were charging that 
long-term employees at an asbestos 
plant near Toronto were dying slow 
deaths from asbestosis. 

The union is demanding that purifi- 
cation equipment be installed in the 
plant to reduce the death-dealing as- 
bestos fibres in the air. 

About half a dozen men who 
worked in the Johns-Mansville plant 
for over 15 years are already dead. 
A spokesman for the union charged 
that the company refused to provide 
essential information in the situation. 

Studies show that working in as- 
bestos plants results in seven to 10 
times the usual death rate from lung 
cancer, three to four times the ex- 
pected rate from stomach and intesti- 
nal cancer, and a high rate of death 
from asbestosis, a disease from which 
non-industrial workers are free. 

Home Repairs for 
Manitoba Pensioners 

The Manitoba government at Win- 
nipeg is gratified with the response 
from old age pensioners to its ofler 
of labor grants to repair and renovate 
their homes under the Provincial Em- 
ployment Program — PEP. 

By the March 15th deadline a total 
of 12,351 applications had been re- 
ceived. This assures that the S4 mil- 
lion allocated to the program will be 
used. 

The average grant on approved ap- 
plications will amount to about $350. 

The PEP is coordinated by the Pro- 
vincial Job Office which is responsible 
for spending $13.45 million for var- 
ious employment projects. (CPA) 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



Halifax Member Finds Use for Non-Returnable 
Bottles; He Builds a Home with 35,000 of Them 




Keith Mitchell la>ing non-returnable bottles on the outside 
of bis new house. He cemented about six of them at a time. 





A section of the outside wall of the Mitchell home, showing 
one section complete with bottles and another section insulated 
with aluminum and awaiting more bottles. 









The view from the Eastern Shore at Ilalifav, as the Mitchells 
see it from their front door. 





■ A little more than three years ago Keith Mitchell of 
Local 83, Halifax, Nova Scotia, started collecting non- 
returnable soft drink bottles from several nearby stores. 

He also enlisted the aid of a friendly city of Halifax 
garbage collector to collect more. 

Two years ago he started building a home in East Jeddore 
out of all the bottles he had collected thus far, and, as he 
continued to collect bottles he started building the founda- 
tion. 

"Once the basement was poured and the house boarded 
in, I started tackling the job of mortaring the pop bottles 
on the outside." he relates. 

"By the time the house was three-quarters complete, I 
had used more than 25.000 bottles and had about 10.000 
more bottles in the backyard ready to be cemented in." 
He finished the job the following summer. 

Mitchell says he originally planned to use beach rocks on 
the exterior of the dwelling but decided against it because 
of their heavy weight. 

'"At the time I was about to start construction, non- 
returnable bottles were becoming widely used by various 
soft drink distributors, and I decided to use them," he adds. 

"The non-returnable bottles might not be worth anything 
at the corner store, but they were worth a lot to me." 

He laid the bottles on their sides with the bottoms facing 
out and cemented about six at a time. The bottles, which 
were clear and green, made a beautiful addition to the 
exterior walls. 

Mitchellsayshe 
saved money in 
building materials 
and he expects to 
save money in 
maintenance. 

Mrs. Mitchell, 
the mother of 
three toddlers, 
says that there 
has been an addi- 
tional virtue: The 
bottles hold the 
heat from the sun, 

and they heat the ^^^ ^^^^ ^^CV 

entire five-room 

house with a small space heater. The Mitchells plan to in- 
stall a furnace later. 

Mitchell recognizes the fact that he's in "a glass house," 
but he's prepared for breakage. He says the bottles im- 
bedded in the walls would have to be broken deliberately, 
and "if one was damaged, I would replace it with a new 
bottom." 

The only problem he has encountered with broken 
bottles occurred during the winter, when some of the bottles 
stored in the backyard broke when they filled with water 
and froze. 

"After that, I made sure that the bottles were turned 
upside down to keep the water out," says Mitchell. ■ 




JUNE, 1973 



13 



^ Ms 



I g 







Nixon 1973 Legislative 
Proposals 'Unacceptable' 

By Press Associates, Inc. 

So far as the AFL-CIO is concerned 
the Nixon Administration has come to 
bat five times on major legislative pro- 
posals and each time has struck out. 

The proposals are on trade, minimimi 
wage, unemployment compensation, pen- 
sions and taxes. 

In an analysis of these major proposals, 
the AFL-CIO Executive Council laid 
down its own proposals and where they 
differ from those of Nixon. 

Trade: The Council declared that the 
Nixon proposals "provide no specific ma- 
chinery to regulate the flood of imports 
and. indeed, would cause greater damage 
to American employment and industrial 
production." The Council said that many 
of the proposals already are on the law 
books but are not being used and that 
Nixon said nothing about the exportation 
of American technology and capital. It 
objected to the President's request for 
absolute power to negotiate trade agree- 
ments as "unacceptable in a democracy." 
Instead, the Council called for enactment 
of the Burke-Hartke Bill. "We shall ag- 
gressively seek Burke-Hartke's favorable 
consideration and enactment by the Con- 
gress." the Council said. 

Miniiniim Wage: The Nixon proposals, 
as spelled out by Secretary of Labor Peter 
Brennan. "are even worse than the Ad- 
ministration's proposals of last year," the 
Council said. There are two major back- 
ward steps so far as the AFL-CIO is 
concerned — a subminimum for teenagers 
and a lowering of the proposed wage rate 
from $2.00 an hour to $L90. "Faced with 
skyrocketing inflation, the denial of decent 
wage increases, new coverage and the 
elimination of overtime exemptions to 
millions of the lowest paid workers must 
be considered by the AFL-CIO as a social 
crime. We repeat our demand for imme- 
diate Congressional action to vastly im- 
prove the Fair Labor Standards Act." 

Unemployment Compensation: The 
Nixon proposals for covering farm work- 
ers and setting up Federal standards for 
weekly benefit payments are good so far 
as the AFL-CIO is concerned, but the 
rest of the Presidential package is not. 
There are no standards for how long un- 
employment must last before a worker 
is eligible nor are there standards for how 
Continued on Page 30 













Local 


Con- 














Union 


vention 














Contri- 


Contri- 










Local City & State 


butions 


butions 


Total 










GEORGIA 






^^ ^^ ^^ .^^ 


^■^^ 


^^ 


283 


Augusta 


10.00 




10.00 


REPO 


»R 


T 




IDAHO 












2816 


Emmett 


10.00 




10.00 


. 


•»'t*Wt*i'X'W 


«••«««» 




ILLINOIS 






i^^^MM^^^^ 


^mm 


WMM 


1 


Chicago 


100.00 




100.00 








16 

62 

63 

166 


Springfield 
Chicago 
Bloomington 
Rock Island 


5.00 
50.00 

5.00 
17.00 




5.00 
50.00 

5.00 
17.00 


CLIC Contributions 




for (he month ending May 15, 1973 


169 


East St. Louis 


20.00 




20.00 








18! 


Chicago 


44.00 




44.00 








242 


Chicago 


10.00 




10.00 


Local 


Con- 




416 


Chicago 


15.00 




15.00 


Union 


vention 




433 


Belleville 


10.00 




10.00 


Contri- 


Contri- 




461 


Highwood 


10.00 




10.00 


I.ocal City & State bunons 


l>ution$ 


Total 


1889 


Downers Grove 69.00 




69.00 


AlABAMA 








INDIANA 






1 Birmingham 40.00 
1243 Fairbanks 


10.00 


40.00 
10.00 


1003 


Indianapolis 


23.00 




23.00 


1556 Hunlsville 10.00 




10.00 




LOUISIANA 






ALASKA 






247 


Lake Charles 


15.00 




15.00 


1501 Ketchikan 30.00 




30.00 


720 


Baton Rouge 




15.00 


15.00 








764 


Shreveport 




75.00 


75.00 


ARIZONA 






953 


Lake Charles 




90.00 


90.00 


1089 Phoenix 22.00 




22.00 


1098 


Baton Rouge 




65.00 


65.00 








1312 


New Orieans 




10.00 


10.00 


ARKANSAS 






1476 


Lake Charles 




5.00 


5.00 


2660 Huttig 20.00 




20.00 


1811 


Monroe 




30.00 


30.00 








1846 


New Orleans 




15.00 


15.00 


CALIFORNIA 




1897 


Lafayette 




80.00 


80.00 


1453 Huntington 






2032 


Bastrop 




5.00 


5.00 


Beach 20.00 




20.00 


2192 


Ruston 




20.00 


20.00 


1752 Pomona 10.00 




10.00 


2258 


Houma 




20.00 


20.00 


2172 Santa Ana 10.00 




10.00 


2436 


New Orleans 




10.00 


10.00 


2203 Anaheim 30.00 




30.00 


3094 


Florien 




10.00 


10.00 


2308 Fullerton 10.00 




10.00 


3101 


Oakdale 




10.00 


10.00 


2361 Garden Grove 10.00 




10.00 




MASSACHUSETTS 




2559 San Francisco 


20.00 


20.00 


















3"' 


Springfield 


46.00 




46.00 


COLORADO 






48 


Fitchburg 




10.00 


10.00 


515 Colorado 






860 


Framingham 


58.00 




58.00 


Springs 10.00 




10.00 












1351 LeadviUe 10.00 




10.00 




MICHIGAN 






CONNECTICUT 




335 
898 


Grand Rapids 
St. Joseph 


10.00 
20.00 




10.00 
20.00 


260 Waterbuiv 35.00 




35.00 












1520 Bridgeport 20.00 




20.00 




MISSOURI 






DELAVVARE 






61 


Kansas City 


15.00 




15.00 


1545 Wilmington 20.00 




20.00 


1596 


St. Louis 


10.00 




10.00 








1792 


Sedalia 


50.00 




50.00 


WASHINGTON, 


D.C. 














132 Washington. 








MONTANA 






D.C. 49.10* 




49.10 


153 


Helena 




10.00 


10.00 


1 145 Washington, 






1090 


Bozeman 




10.00 


10.00 


D.C. 21.05* 




21.05 












1339 Washington. 








NEW JERSE-i 






D.C. 10.00 




10.00 


15 


Hackensack 




20.00 


20.00 


1590 Washington. 






65 


Perth Amboy 


40.00 


10.00 


50.00 


D.C. 164.15* 




164.15 


306 


Newark 


60.00 




60.00 


1631 Washington. 






349 


Orange 




10.00 


10.00 


D.C. 21.05* 




21.05 


383 


Bayonne 


20.00 




20.00 


1831 Washington. 






393 


Camden 


6079* 




60.79 


D.C. 18.10* 




18.10 


432 


Atlantic City 




10.00 


10.00 


2311 Washington. 






455 


Somerville 




10.00 


10.00 


D.C. 42.70* 




42.70 


490 


Passaic 


60.00 


25.00 


85.00 


FLORIDA 






620 

715 


Madison 
Elizabeth 




120.00 
10.00 


120.03 
10.00 


727 Hialeah 10.00 




10.00 


842 


Pleasantvillc 


20.00 


20.00 


40.00 


819 West Palm 






1107 


N. Plainfield 


50.70* 




50.70 


Beach 50.00 




50.00 


1209 


Newark 




10.00 


10.00 


1379 North Miami 10.00 




10.00 


1489 


Burlington 


42.20* 




42.20 


1509 Miami 10.00 




10.00 


2018 


Lakewood 


40.00 




40.00 


1554 Miami 10.00 




10.00 


2098 


Camden 




20.00 


20.00 


2340 Bradenton 50.00 




50.00 


2250 


Red Bank 




15.00 


15.00 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



Local City & State 



Local Con- 
Union vention 
Contri- Contri- 
butions butions Total 



NEW MEXICO 



1319 Albuquerque 


286.00 


2204 Las Vegas 


4.00 


NEW YORK 


6 Amsterdam 


40.00 


77 Port Chester 


20.00 


281 Binghamton 


30.00 


310 Norwich 


10.00 


357 IsUp 


60.00 


503 Lancaster 


20.00 


754 Fulton 


12.00 


1483 Patchoque 


82.00 


1575 Endicott 


30.00 


1577 Buffalo 


40.00 


1656 Oneonta 


10.00 




OHIO 


525 Coshocton 


20.00 


650 Pomeroy 


90.00 


1426 Elyria 


40.00 


OKLAHOMA 


2008 Ponco City 


30.00 



OREGON 



190 

226 
573 
583 
738 
780 
933 
1001 

1020 
1065 
1094 
1120 
1273 
1277 
1388 
1411 
1.502 
1857 
1896 
1961 
2066 
2067 
2130 
2275 
2416 
2419 
2627 
2750 



Klamath Falls 
Portland 
Baker 
Portland 
Portland 
Astoria 
Hermiston 
North Bend 
Coos Bay 
Portland 
Salem 
Albany 
Portland 
Eugene 
Bend 

Oregon City 
Salem 
Seaside 
Portland 
The Dalles 
Roseburg 
St. Helens 
Medford 
Hiilsboro 
McMinnville 
Portland 
Astoria 

Cottage Grove 
Springfield 



100.00 



Vic. 



22.00 



14.00 



10.00 
215.00 
15.00 
30.00 
35.00 
20.00 
10.00 

30.00 
120.00 
40.00 
30.00 
30.00 
80.00 
40.00 
50.00 
20.00 
15.00 
20.00 
30.00 
10.00 
20.00 
50.00 
15.00 
10.00 
40.00 
10.00 

10.00 



286.00 
4.00 



40.00 
20.00 
30.00 
10.00 
60.00 
20.00 
12.00 
82.00 
30.00 
40.00 
10.00 



20.00 
90.00 
40.00 



30.00 



10.00 
215.00 
15.00 
30.00 
35.00 
20.00 
10.00 

30.00 
120.00 
40.00 
30.00 
1 30.00 
80.00 
40.00 
50.00 
20.00 
15.00 
20.00 
30.00 
10.00 
20.00 
50.00 
37.00 
10.00 
40.00 
10.00 
14.00 
10.00 





Local 


Con- 






Union 


vention 






Contri- 


Contri- 




Local City & State 


butions 


butions 


Total 


2785 The Dalles 




10.00 


10.00 


2851 La Grande 




10.00 


10.00 


2881 Portland 




10.00 


10.00 


2949 Roseburg 




10.00 


10.00 


3035 Springfield 




10.00 


10.00 


PENNSYLVANIA 




122 Philadelphia 


48.00 




48.00 


239 Easton 


21.00 




21.00 


287 Harrisburg 


1,202.00 


1,202.00 


368 Allentown 


38.00 




38.00 


677 Lebanon 


20.00 




20.00 



1333 Slate College 156.00 

RHODE ISLAND 

94 Providence 250.00 

TENNESSEE 
1512 Blountville 20.00 



977 Wichita 
1226 Pasadena 
1971 Temple 



1886 Brigham 



TEXAS 

10.00 

120.00 

10.00 

UTAH 



VIRGINIA 



1665 
2033 



Alexandria 
Front Royal 



22.05* 
21.05* 



156.00 



250.00 



20.00 



10.00 

120.00 

10.00 



10.00 10.00 



22.05 
21.05 



WASHINGTON 



338 Seattle 
470 Tacoma 
770 Yakima 
1036 Longview 
1148 Olympia 
2498 Longview 
2767 Morton 



72.00 

24.00 
50.00 



10.00 
10.00 

10.00 



15.00 



WEST VIRGINIA 

939 Weston 7.00 



WISCONSIN 



264 Milwaukee 

314 Madison 

849 Manitowoc 

1208 Milwaukee 



10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



10.00 
10.00 
72.00 
10.00 
24.00 
50.00 
15.00 



7.00 



10.00 
10.00 

10.00 
10.00 



*This includes the 1% payroll deduction 
of the fulltime Officers and Business Repre- 
sentatives. 



RECENT SPECIAL GROUP CONTRIBUTIONS 

NEW JERSEY LEGISLATIVE CONFERENCE $ ''70 00 

(April) 

LOUISIANA STATE COUNCIL CONVENTION .. 500 00 

(April) 

KANSAS STATE COUNCIL CONVENTION 830 OO 

(May) 

ALABAMA STATE COUNCIL CONVENTION I77 00 

(April) 

WASHINGTON STATE COUNCIL CONVENTION 1430 00 

(May) ' 

CALIFORNIA STATE COUNCIL LEGISLATIVE CONFERENCE 2^50 00 
(May) "" ' 

MISSOURI STATE COUNCIL CONVENTION 846 00 

INDIANA STATE COUNCIL CONVENTION .V 1.590.00 

LU.-5— St. Louis. Missouri contributed $160.00 in 1972 and overlooked in the 197"' 
final report. 

•'South Jersey District Council j ^-)-, .0 

*Represents 1% payroll deduction of the full time Business Agents as of May 15," 1973. 

JUNE, 1973 




^*i Snuit/m 



"The only thing that I can gather 
from my non-union wage scale 
is my pantsr 



The cost of living continues to rise. 
Your friends and neighbors will 
be pulling their belts tighter than 
you're pulling yours ... if you 
don't tell them the advantages of 
union membership. 






■'While in tram 
ins I earned 
$200 ... now 
have a mobile 
unit ... it was 
best instruction 
one can set." 
Orvrlle Pierce 
LaPuente.Cahf. 



KEY MACHINE 
locks, picks. 

tools supplied '. 
with course. 




You'll EARN MORE, LIVE BEHER 
Than Ever Before in Your Life • 

You'll enjoy your work as a Locksmith 
because it is more fascinating than a 
hobby — and highly paid besides! You'll 
go on enjoying the fascinating work, 
year after year, in good limes or bad 
because you'll be the man in demand in 
an evergrowing field offering big pay 
jobs, big profits as your own boss. What 
more could you ask! 

Train at Home - Earn Extra %%%% Right Away! 
All this can be yours FAST regardless 
of age, education, minor physical handi- 
caps. Job enjoyment and earnings begin 
AT ONCE as you quickly, easily learn 
to CASH IN on all kinds of locksmilhing 
jobs. All keys, locks, parts, picks, special 
tools and equipment come with the 
course at no extra charge. Licensed 
experts guide you lo success. 

Illustrated Book, Sample Lesson Pages FREE 
Locksmithing Institute graduates now 
earning, enjoying life more everywhere. 
You, can, too. Coupon brings exciting 
fads from the school licensed by N. J. 
State Department of Ed.. Accredited 
Member. Natl. Home Study Council, 
Approved for Veterans Training. 
LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE 

Div. Technical Home Study Schools 
Dept.Ul,s-H.;;;Llttle Fails. N. J. 07424 

n 



LOCKSMITHING INSTITUTE. Dept. 1118-063 

Div. Technical Home Study Schools 

Little Falls, New Jersey 07424 Est, 1948 

Please send FREE illustrated Book — "Your Big Oppor- 
tunities in Locksmithing," complete Equipment folder 
and sample lesson pages — FREE of all obligation— 
(no salesman will call). 

Name 



(Please Print) 



City/State/Zip.. 



^— D Check here if Eligible for Veteran Trainins .^-J 



15 



Happy :^^^V2?S 




GOSSIP 



SEND YOUR FAVORITES TO: 

PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONSTITUTION 

AVE. NW, WASH., D.C. 20001. 

SORRY, BUT NO PAYMENT MADE 

AND POETRY NOT ACCEPTED. 



The Last Lap 

Small Boy: Mommy, what happens 
to automobiles when they get too 
old to run? 

Mother: Somebody sells them to 
your daddy. 

ATTEN'D YOUR UNION MEETINGS 

Light Footed 

"Is it true," asked the newcomer, 
"that the alligators in these swamps 
won't bother you if you carry a 
torch?" 

"It all depends," answered the na- 
tive, "how fast you carry it." 

UNIONISM STARTS WITH "U" 

Do Unto Others 

A mother had been lecturing her 
young son about the necessity for 
him to help others, reminding him 
that we are in this world for that 
purpose. 

The youth considered the mother's 
words, then asked: "Well, what are 
the others here for?" 



Apprenticeship 

Four-year-old Phil's father was 
building an addition to the house, 
and, as the boy was anxious to help 
him, the father gave him a hammer. 
After a short while the boy said: 
"Daddy give me your hammer, this 
one won't hit the nails!" — E. G. So- 
vertsen, Local 15, Hackensack, N.J. 

UNION MADE IS WELL MADE 

Prepared Argument 

A young Northern lawyer wrote a 
friend of his in the South and asked 
for advice as to his moving below the 
Mason-Dixon line for the practice of 
law. 

The Southerner replied: "If you are 
an honest lawyer, you will have no 
competition down here. If you are a 
Republican, the game laws will pro- 
tect you." 




Time and Tide 

Middle-Aged Vv/olf: Where have 
you been all my life? 

Slick Chick: Well, for the first half 
of it, I wasn't born. 

ENLIST A NEW MEMBER TODAY 

Warmed-up Soup 

Cohen drops dead at his office, and 
his secretary calls Mrs. Cohen: "Ter- 
rible news. Your husband is dead." 
Mrs. C. says, "Give him some chicken 
soup right away!" 

Secretary replies, "But he's dead, 
Mrs. Cohen. The soup can't help him." 
Mrs. C. Insists, "IT CAN'T DO HIM 
ANY HARM!"— Bob Steele, Station 
WTIC, Hartford, Conn. 



This Month's Limerick 

There once was a lady from Guam, 
Who said, "Now the sea is so calm 

I will swim, for a lark"; 

But she met v/Ith a shark; 
Let us now sing the Ninetieth Psalm. 



Back to the Showers 

The young man realized that his 
continual preoccupation with baseball 
was disrupting his life. He imagined 
himself on the mound for the Oakland 
A's in the World Series, or hitting in 
the cleanup spot in an All-Star Game, 
or making spectacular catches that 
ruined home runs for Johnny Bench 
and Brooks Robinson, and so on. He 
thought he should take his problem 
to a psychiatrist. "The thing has got 
so bad," he told the doctor, "that I 
can't get to sleep anymore thinking 
about baseball and the part I play 
in it." 

"Try this,' said the doctor, "when 
you get Into bed imagine you have a 
beautiful and warm young woman in 
your arms." 

"But if I do that," said the young 
man, "I'd miss my turn at bat." 

WORK SAFELY, ACCIDENTS HURT 

Dialed Out 

Although they are usually com- 
posed of stupid husbands, smug 
wives, and ill-mannered children, 
there is one thing you have to admire 
about the families in the TV serials — 
they don't waste their time watching 
TV. — Denver Post 

UNION DUES BRING SECURITY 

That Figures 

On a quiz program a soldier took 
his place before the microphone. 
"Here s your question," said the 
M.C., "How many successful jumps 
must a paratrooper make before he 
graduates?" 

"All of them," said the soldier. 
BE A GOOD TRADE UNIONIST 




Hail that Cab! 

WIFE: You got to that cab as soon 
as that other guy. Why did you let 
him talk you out of It? 

MILKTOAST: Well, he needed It 
more than I did. He v/as late for his 
karate lesson. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



A gallery of pictures showing some of the senior members of the 
Brotherhood who recently received 25-year or 50-year service pins. 




Omaha, Neb. 



OMAHA, NEB. 

The picture above taken at the 
Omaha District Council Awards and 
Recognition dinner last year. The 
members pictured are those who 
were awarded 25-year pins for 
membership in Omaha Carpenters 
Local 253. Also, in the picture are 
several honored guests. 

FRONT ROW, left to right. Frank 
Berg. Norman Reich, Leon Greene, 
5th District Executive Board 
Member, William Sidell, General 
President: Roy Sack, Earl Hazen, 
and Abner Martin. 



BACK ROW, left to right, Roy 
Riddle, Ernest Mommsen. Robert 
Peitzmeier. Marvin Leander, Walter 
Bowman, Tom Poole, Walter 
Womack, CUireni:e Peck, Eugene 
Shoehigh, General Representative. 
WOODLAND, CALIF. 

Everett Klinkhammer, left 
president of Carpenters Local 1381, 
presented 25 year pins to veteran 
members at a recent meeting of the 
local union. From the left, the 
old-timers are Joseph Russell, 
Raymond Hoover and Riley 
McMichael. 



CORYDON, INO. 

The 25-year members of Local 
2441 received pins on March 22, 
1973. Seated, from left to right: 
George Chaffin. Ivan Carpenter, 
Albert Hughes, Stanley Thomas. 

Standing, left to right, Robert M. 
Wolfe, president of Local 2441, 
who presented the pins; Harry 
Mugler; and Darrell Wolfe, oldest 
official of the Indiana State Council 
of Carpenters Industrial Board, 
member for 17 years. 

Due to sickness, Knofuel Boss and 
Wilbur Faith are not in the picture. 



Woodland, Calif. 



Corydon,lnd. 




fi> 








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b£ lJ^I 


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JUNE, 1973 



17 




CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Local 11 recently celebrated its 
90th anniversary, and, in conjunction 
with the commemoration, it awarded 
service pins to almost 400 of its 
senior members. 

Many of the 25-year members 
honored are shown in the accompany- 
ing pictures. The full list of 
honorees is as follows: 

65-YEAR PINS— John Swenson 
and Frank Vrhecky. 

60-YEAR PINS— J. W. Allen, 
John Cedar, Joseph Corradine. 
William Cunningham, Albert Dacre, 
Bert Kirschner, E. F. Larson, Thomas 
Maxwell, James Robinson, A. E. 
Roper, Anthony Schneider. James 
Smith, Fred Springer, George 
Stevenson, Joseph Viton, J. 
Wollmcrschiedt. 

55-YEAR PINS— Louis Baesel, 
George Bartholme, Sr., Loin's B. Dick, 
A. C. Duckwitz, J. H, Diibiiry, 
E. G. Erwin, August Grabowsky, 
Liidwig Janz, Herbert Jcn-muth. Sr., 
Ward King, Victor Luinge. George 
McKay, Fred Midgley, Arthur 
Simpson, Walter Southwick, Arthur 
Urban, A. E. Veigel, Fred Washburn, 
R. O. Wcndorfe, Frank Zweig. 

50-YEAR PINS— James Cappe, 
C. H. Catlian, R. S. Corlett. Vno 
Elmey, A. R. Fottz, Harold Fritz. 
Louis Fuller, Frank Hirz. Raymond 
Hummer, Joseph Infant, Cecil Jenkins, 
Joseph Kodrick, Carmen Murano, 
Fred Nemecek, Veto Pace, A. R. 
Walborn, Gordon Ward. 

45-YEAR PINS— Hugo Amundsen, 
Julius Buhrow, Wayne Gaboon, 
Frank Hill, James Hodan, Anton 
Loncar, Harold Mellott, George 
Meyer, Albert Nicholls, Samuel 
Porter, Edward Shaefer, Fred Singer, 
Edward Snider, James Tipka, Frank 
Vlach, James Vober. 

40-YEAR PINS— Benny Belfiore 
and Roman Hummer. 

35-YEAR PINS—Basilio Artino, 
Albert Beehler, Jack Burgeson. 
Salvatore Calo, John Dehaan, Leo 
DiGiovanni, Albert Dister, Arvid 
Edman, John Ferencz, George Galla. 

Biagio Germana, John Gerome, 
Otto Graff, William Hakola, Joseph 
Hatkovics, William Heald, Raymond 
Hilger, Frank Hucek, EIroy Janus. 
Clyde Kersten, Marcus Kellel, 
Herbert Koerner, John Kovach, 
James Kiibick, Mark Kurdziel, 




Cleveland, O., Honorees 

E. Lambert, Louis Lanese. August 
Lau, James Mason, Michael McCrone, 
Joseph Meyer, Joseph Novak, 
Edward Osborne, Bernard Olsen. 

William Palmer, Charles Piscopo, 
Frank Prevost, Richard Rculke, Sr., 
Frank Roberts, John Roth, James 
Ryhal, William Siuivido, James 
Sargent, Norman Snyderhnrn. 

Nick Soika, Anthony Spetrino, 
Erwin Suesse, Wilberl Siwssc. Walter 
Suntala, Oscar Swensen, Frank Taras, 
Alfred Tomasello, Frank \'alvoda, 
Frank Vanek, Tom Vitale, 
Otto Werman. 

30-YEAR PINS— Edward 
A homines, Russell Balstad, Ray 
Bartholme, Ross Bontempo. C. W. 
Bryant, Sam Calo, Frank Campbell, 
Clarence Calon, Anthony Cipiti, 
Miller Coffey, Julius Conrad. Harold 
Cosgriff, John Cotton, Robert Davis, 
Gus DeFahio, Charles Dragonwr, 
R. L. Dunkin, Steve Filipek, Robert 
Gaffney, William Gelliarth. 

Clarence Gibbes, Robert Gibson, 
Frank Giorgianni, Pat Gliozzo, 
Lester Goetz, Herman Gordon, 
Elmer Gvozdak, William Hedrich, 
Walter Heller. Alfred Horacek, 
Reuben Hubbard, August Indovina, 
Ralph Jelinck, David Johnson, 
Faymon Johnson, Clair Jones, Ed 
Kilpatrick, John Lakkola, John 
Logalbo. 

James Magee, John May. Rodrick 
McKenzie, Edward Morrell. John 
Moss, Joseph Motyka. Chester Mull, 
Sam Piscitello, Toivo Ronni. James 
Salamon, Frank Schanz. John Schilens, 
Frank Scimone, Tony Scimone, 
Hugh Scroggins, John Sertic, Howard 
W. Shay, Henry Smith. 

Jack Spirek, Alex Stojkov. Arthur 
Suesse, George Sullivan, Hernmn 
Swensen, Harry Taras, Fred Thies. 
Tobias Tucker, Thomas Wallenhorst, 



Nick Waselesion. James Woods, 
Evers Young, Edward Ziinmerlin. 

25-YEAR PINS—Elno Airaksinen, 
Robert Apple, Joseph Argiso, Henry 
Armstrong, John G. Bailey, Edward 
Barberic, James A. Banks, Thomas 
Barberic, John Baricevich. Steven 
Bartko, John Baron, George 
Bartholme, Jr., Charles Bartko, 
Donald Beal, Alfred Belfiore, Leroy 
Bertonaschi, Otto Bielert, Sidney 
Blumenthal, John Bodnar, Louis 
Bontempo. 

Michael Braskich, K. P. Breyley, 
Walter Brock, Jr., Robert C. Brown, 
Joseph Buchwald, Philip Calo, Donald 
Campbell, Edward Ciekanski, Turner 
demons, Floyd Collette, Joseph 
Cooke, Frank Cooks, Emerick J. 
Corsi, Fred A . Corsi, Howard Coulter, 
Robert Cox, Fred Cozart, 
Hubert Crites 

William Crowley, Jr., William Ciilp, 
Edward Czaba, Steve Czika, Paul 
Davidson, Lonnie Decs, Dominic 
Delbalso, Dominic DeMarco, Victor 
DiGeronimo, Joseph Dopira, Charles 
Dowd, Frank Draper, William Diuh, 
Loins Dutude, Andrew Duris, John 
Dziak, John Charles Eagen, Jr., 
Philip Enia. 

Michael Evancuski, Elnwr Evans, 
Clarence Faecking, Michael 
Farkasofsky, Charles Fiorelli, 
Peter Fiorentino, Ercell Fisher, Andy 
Flack, Ray Fletcher, Stanley 
Florjancic, Edward Flowers, Michael 
Fogel, Louis Forcina, Nathaniel 
Foster, Bert Gar lick, Ed wind G asanas, 
Mitchell Gawr)'. 

Robert Gedeon, Frank Germana, 
James Germana, A. J. Giallombardo, 
John Gibson, Felix Glowacki, O. J. 
Goff, Fred Guzzo, William Hann, 
Herman Hill, Jr., Benjamin Holland, 
William Hopkins, Herman Houston, 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



Jcndd Hulcliison, Thomas James, 
Jerry Jaiulidlo. 

Robert Janus, Harry D. Johnson, 
Joe H. Kaszar, Arthur Kaye, H. A. 
Kellar, Alvord Kellogg, Charles 
Kennedy, Edwin Kephart, Sam 
Kephart, Sam Kerns, Henry Kersman, 
Louis Kees, Wallace Keyes, Martin 
Kilcoyne, George Kizzire, William 
Kohouf. Jr. 

Richard Korver, Peter Kozak, 
Mike Krehel. Richard J. Kiirth, 
William Lawry, Edward Leiden, 
George Lemire, A I Lino, Ed 
Loschelder, Pete Lucko, Claude Liint, 
Clarence Mack, Ian MacRae. 

Robert Major, Edmund Malzan, 
Dale Martens, Frank McCormick, 
Richard Mendala, Edward Mercier, 
Sr., George Mezie, John Miller, 
John R. Miller, Clifton Moore, 
Tliomas Moran, John Mortier, Harry 
Miilana.x, William Mum'. George 
Nestor, William Newkirk, John 
Noble, Thomas Nook, Patd Olitsky. 

Albert Pachasa, Valerian Paul. 
Frank Penchak. Joe Petkosh, Kenneth 
Perz, Anton Pierce, Frank Pittin. 
Joint Pituch. Alex Piwarski. Clifford 
Podojil, John Poshedley. Jerry Posla, 
Leo Pozek. Robert Preuss, Ocie Price, 
Frank Prijatel, George Racin, 
Richard Radke, Joseph Ratcjiczak, 
Alex Rcid. Ralph Rendsland. Sitnon 
Rettman. John Rider. Merle Robinsmi, 
Marvin Salamon, Michael Salvaiore. 
E. J. Schumann, Robert Schunuinn, 
Maly Shelton, Carl Skalak, Anthony 
Sobole. Albert Sowkup, Ronald 
Sprague. 

Clarence Staley, Nick Stovarskey, 
Frank Strand, Chester Sullivan. 
Henry Svoboda, Leroy Swope. 
Eber Tallmun, Curtis Terrell. Joe 
Thomas. Charles Tomazic. A. 
Tranchita. Carl Urso. Donnnic Vadini, 
Vernon Vundeiihurgh. 

Albert Walko. Raymond Wasniuk, 
Williani Wasniak. William Watson, 
Jack WyatI, William Zimmerlin, 
Herbert Zinn, Carl Zipfel, 
Joseph Zulu. 



FREMONT, O. 

Carpenters Local 1 166 recently 
lield a dinner banquet for members, 
wives, and friends. Gilbert Walters 
was presented a 25-year pin by 
Ernest Denecia, business represent- 
ative of Lake Erie District Council 
of Carpenters. 

President Bob Zink invited mem- 
bers to introdtice titemseives and the 
vi.'iitors. Cornelius Ringlein, oldest 
member of the local, was present. 



CHICO, CALIF. 

Local I495's second annual pin 
presentation was held March 19, at 
whicli time 11 members were eligible 
to receive pins. 

Pin recipients are shown, left to 
right: Pete Labron, Ernest VanSant, 
Warren Hill, Kenneth Smith, Leiand 




LOUISVILLE, KY. 

Twenty-five-year pins were presented recently to members of Local 909. 

Front row, left to right: Ted Pitts, secretary-treasurer. Falls Cities 
Carpenters District Council: Harrison Brown, member of Local 909; 
and Noah James, member of Local 909. 

Back Row. left to right: George Barker. Amos Gannon, Boyd Miller, 
William Smith. Kenny Bowles, Earl Brumley, Nolan Petty. Dale H . Rouark, 
president. Falls Cities Carpenters District Council, and Kenny Lone, 
member of Local 909. 




Portland, Ore. 




Columbia, til. 



Cochran. R. E. Franklin. Otto 
Koch. Eligible but unable to attend 
were: Curtis Jones. Dominic Veffredo, 
Lyie Beck, and Ray Gerfen. 



PORTLAND, ORE. 

Local 55.1 recently honored 50-year 
members and their wives. Swan 
Nelson, executive secretary of the 
Portland District Council of Car- 
penters made the presentation of pins. 

Here are pictures of Nick Hansen, 
David O. F. Anderson, A. B. Fields 
and Swan Nelson who presented 
the pins. Not pictured is Jack 
Sii-ibcrg. 50-year member, who was 
unable to attend. 

In the small picture Swan Nelson, 
right, executive secretary of the 
Portland District Council, presents 
50-year pins to Nick Hansen. David 
O. F. Anderson, and A. B. Fields. 
Not pictured is 50-year-member Jack 
Swiberg. 



COLUMBIA, ILL. 

The picture above was taken on 
March 31. 1973, at a dinner-dance 
to celebrate the 50th year of Car- 
penters Local 1997. In the picture, 
from left, are: International Repre- 
sentative Don Gorman, Charter 
Member Arthur W. Beckmann. and 
Business Representalii^e Lloyd E. 
Arras. Arras presented Beckmann 
with a watch given by the Members 
of Local 1997 for serving almost 
his entire 50 years as an officer of 
the local. 



JUNE, 1973 



19 




^ ' % # 



^ ^.^i 



. ^^'» 



:^>«- 



CHICAGO, ILL. 

On Februai-y 21. 1973. Carpenlcrs 
Local No. 434 awarded 25-yeur 
pins to 228 members at their first 
Annual Presentation Dinner. Pictured 
above are those M-ho attended. Tho.se 
wlio did not attend received their 
pins by mail. 

Those honored included: 

Joseph Abrams. Jr.. Junws F. A gee, 
Theodore Alexander. Carl B. An- 
derson, Roy Anderson, Peter Arlow- 
ski, Helge Aiine, Williant Baugh. 
Wm. G. Beemsterboer, Ray Beiriger. 
Edward Belt. Raymond W. Bender, 
Dominick Benevenii, Joe Beneventi. 
George Bensema, Carl B. Benson. 
R. S. Bergstrom, Tlieodore Bergiinder. 
William Bertoia, Elmer Bitterlin. 
Edward Blocker, Cast Bloomquist. 
Jake Boeder, Brose E. Bond. Vernon 
Bond, Marvin Bonnenia, Joseph 
Borsr. Chester Borys, Eugene Bouina, 
Joseph Boiitcher, Stewart Johnson, 
Roy Pyle, Harry Samiielson, 
George Thullen, Men-shall Braccio, 
Richard Brandsma, Robert Brandsma, 
Frank Brolic, Edward Brow)i. John 
BroMii, Roger Broivn, William 
Bryant, M. G. Burkeem, C. L. 
Carlson. Richard Carriel. A. W. 
Chapman. Frank Chidichinio, Cleo 
Christian, Franl Cicola, Jr.. Joseph 
Clark. Earl Clay. Charles Clemonds. 
John Cohan. Richard Conrad. Gene 
Cubalchini. Orelio DeLorenzo. Ray- 
mond DeVries, James W. DeYoung. 
Nich DeYoiing, Ted DeYoung, 
Roland Dunand, Albert Dykstra, 
Carl Eckman, John Eckman, Gerrit 
Eenigenbiirg, Frank Wllemenl. 
Adam Engelman, Aitsiito Favaro, 
Harold Fleischman, Frank Fnclis. 
Joseph Gabay, Elmer Gaetner, 
G. L. Gherman, Albert Genovese, 
Phillip George, James Cillen. Henry 
Goos, Earl Gordon, G. Gudmondson. 
Edward Gurgle. Willis Ciith. Riissel 
Hall, Michael Hawtree. Abram 
Haywood, Nick Hogenbrick, Carl 
Holmgren, Emil Holmgren, John 
Horvat, Henry Huntley, A. Iverson. 
.4ndy Jacobs. Hiram Jacobs. Andrew 
Jacobs, Walter Jellemu, Frank 



Johhe, Mario Jobbe, Gunnar 
Johanson, Gust Johnson, Gustaf 
Johnson, Nels Johnson, Otis Johnson, 
Victor Johnson, Rudy Jurkiewicz, 
Peter Kaczmarek, John Kerkoven, 
Fred Kindt, David Kinkeu, Marion 
Kapnowski, Edward Koz.olowski, 
Paul Each, Howard Lash. Roy 
Laiiridsen. Edward Laiitenbach, 
Leonard Lay, M. Laycoa.v. Clyde 
Lee. Tliorsten Lindmark. John 
Ludwig, Giistav Lundqiiist. Clayton 
Mack. Leroy Madsen. Peter 
Majkowski. Mathew Maharyk. Eli 
Martin, Harold Martin, Leo Martino, 
Herman Mayes, Raymond McCabe, 
Don McGary, Q. V. McGary. 
Charles Mellendorf, I gnat:. Mente, 
James Mestaiiskas, Walter 
Mestau.'.kas, Alex Met:., August 
Michnda, Patrick Moran, Ralph 
Mossberg, Ludwig Mueller, Clarence 
Mulder. Elmer Mielsen. Edward L. 
Nelson. John Nich. Timothy 
O'Conncr, Norman Olson. Ole Olson. 
Cornelius Ooms, Hubert Osowski, 
S. Packauskas, Anthony Page, Angela 
Palmo, Harry Perki}is, Ivar Peterson, 
Victor Peterson, Richard Plullips, 
Walter Pochron, Mike Pnkulla, 
George Pukalla, John Pyle, Theodore 
Pyle. Selh Ranson, Jesher Reichert, 



William Rhodes, Herbert Ribbons, 
Alphonse Reigert, John Rinkema, 
Lloyd Risberg, Melvin Rogers, Wm. 
Roverkamp. Donald Riiis, Thaddeiis 
Rys, Evert Samuelson, Gunnar 
Sandquist. Ate.x Saunders, Dorney 
Saunders, M. J. Savoie, Fredrich 
Schnooc, Ivan Schoning, C. J. 
Scoffield. William Scott. Joseph Seitz. 
Albert Senovitz, Harry Sikma, Chis 
Slebos, John Slebos, Ed Soderstrom, 
John Sopko, Chester Sosnowski, 
Dom Sosnowski, D. Spagnollo, 
Alphonse Specius, Charles Sprietsma, 
Sake Stall, Arnold Stick, Rudolph 
Stone, Anton Stranowsky, Walford 
Stromberg, Anthony Svec, Frank 
Svec, John Seanson, Staidey 
Tatarczyk, Hertnan Teninga. Arthur 
Thullen, John Tuinengu. Henry 
VanDeel, Lester Vandeursen. Gerril 
VanDriinen, Walter VanDyke, Norm 
VanEtlen, HE. E. VanGrondelle. Ray 
VanMecrten. Marvin VunMeerten. 
Louis }'anZelst, George Veenstra, 
Robert Vcille, Robert Venturin, 
Wesley Verhoek, Carl Visenti. John 
Wail, Harry Walthers, Elmer Wendt, 
Hilding Wetman. Ben Wiggen, 
George Wolfe. Alfred Wyfand, 
Charles Wyre, Ale.x Yzbick, 
Charles Zimmerman. 





Ten Sure Ways 


To Kill Your Union 


1. 


Don't go to meetings. 


7. 


Do nothing more than is ab- 


2 


If you do, go late. 




solutely necessary, but when 


3 


If the weather doesn't suit 




other members roll up their 




you, do not think of going. 




sleeves and willingly and un- 


4. 


When you attend meetings. 




selfishly use their ability to 




find fault with the officers and 




help matters, howl that the 




members. 




union is run by a clique. 


5. 


Never accept an ofTice, as it 


8. 


Hold back your dues as long 




is easier to criticiie than do 




as possible, or don't pay at 




things yourself. 




all. 


6. 


If asked by the chairman to 








give your opinion regarding 


9. 


Do not bother about getting 




some important matters, tell 




new members— let George or 




him you have nothing to offer 




Bill do it. 




on the subject. After the meet- 


10. 


When the union "busts up," 




ing tell everybody how it 




tell everyone you knew all 




ought to have been done. 




along it would. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 






LONGVIEW, WASH. 

Plywood Workers Local 2498 
celebrates its 25th Antiiversarx in 
1973. 

On February 18, 1973. a special 
meeting ii-fl.v held to honor the 20 
and 25-year members. The special 
meeting was held in the fornt of a 
reception, with cake and coffee to 
honor the members and present 
membership pins. 

Twenty-year members Betty 
Laiirsen and J. W. Mask show off 
the anniversary cake prepared to 
lionor senior members of Plywood 
Workers Local 2498. 

Twenty-five-year members honored 
by Local 2498. seated, left to right. 
Murray R. Milmine, John Paul 
Wright, Steve A. Stangle, Richard 
L. Dual, Mack D. Keltiier, and 
Lyie E. Fowler. Standing, left to 
right, Willis E. Chtiinard, Jess L. 
Donner, Clifford C, Laursen, Garten 
J, Tidd, Fred L. Madsen, Frank E. 
Rand, and Walter A. Porter. 



DOWNERS GROVE, ILL. 

Twenty-five-year pins were 
presented to Carl Bnimmel. Henry 
Weiten, William Ponsteiii, Rudolph 
Klena, Roy Barkdoll. Robert Arnold, 
and Earl .Stanley of Local 1889 
recently. Presentation was made by 
Charles A. Thompson, secretary- 
treasurer of the Chicago District 
Council, assisted by Arthur Prokaski, 
president of Local 1889. 

During the past si.x months, 
25-year-pins were presented to the 
following members — LeRoy Pearson, 
Raymond Swanson. Henry Borinan 
was presented with a 50-year pin 
and is pictured with Otto Vi.\, who 
has over 48 years membership. 
Brother Vi.x is recording secretary of 
Local 1889. 




Long view. Wash., Honorees 



Downers Grove, 




Front Row; Rudolph Klena, Roy Barkdoll, Robert Arnold, Arthur Prokaski. 
Back Row: Carl Brummel, Henry Weiten, William Ponstein, Charles Thompson. 





Roy Barkdoll, Earl Stanley 



Henry Borman, Otto Vix 





ivo; inond Swanson 



LeRoy Pearson 



JUNE, 1973 



21 





NEW YORK, N.r. 

Carpenters Local 20, Staten Island, 
recently held a dinner dance, 
celebrating its 55th anniversary and 
presenting service pins to members. 

Members were presented service 
pins by Patrick Campbell, First 
District GEB Member. 



(1) The 25-year members are shown 
in the first picture. Front Row: Edwin 
Anderson, Don Belvin, Herb 
Carlson, Ed. Currier, Walter Lawler, 
Al Checke, Anthony Campomenosi, 
Anthony DeLisa, John Gorezakowski, 
Joseph Doiicett, Stanley Nilsen, 

and Giistave Jensen. 

Rear Row: GEB Member Pat 
Campbell, Business Agent Fred 
Pearson, Joseph Lawrence, Ralph 
Omholt, Oscar Meinelschmidt. 
Norman Olsen, Len Holm, Walter 
White, Jack Sykes, Arthur Omholt, 
John Potusek, Mike Grasso, Jack 
Van Stratum, Cosimo Serio, William 
Mahoney. first vice president, N.Y. 
District Council of Carpenters, and 
Coiurut Olsen, president, N,Y. 
District Council. 

(2) The 30- and 35-year members 
(shown in the second picture) re- 
ceived their service pins from GEB 
member Campbell are, John Duro, 
Henry Swenson, William Mahoney, 
Thomas Carfagna, Andrew Bellina, 
John Omholt, Staidey Olsen, and 
Joseph Nicotra. 

(3) In the third picture are the 
members receiving their 50-year pins. 
They are: Fred Pearson, business 
agent, and Pat Campbell, GEB 
member, congratulating Nils Nilssen; 
Steve Svidersky congratulated by 
Conrad Olsen, president of N.Y.D.C. 
of Carpenters; Adam Scherer and 
Larry Hendrickson congratulated 

by William Mahoney, first vice- 
president of N.Y.D.C. 

(4) A 60-year member, William Bir- 






mingham, center, was congratulated 
by Edward Anitore, financial secre- 
tary; Pat Campbell, GEB member; 
Fred Pearson, business agent; 



William Mahoney, first vice-president 
of N.Y.D.C. of Carpenters; and 
Conrad Olsen, president of N.Y.D.C. 
of Carpenters. 



22 



THE CARPENTER 




<^^ 



NANTICOKE, PA. 

Carpenters Local 414 rccenily 
presented service pins. Members and 
years of service are as follows: 

Seated, first row, left to right, 
Frank Chapin (31 yrs.); John 
Koshinski (HI); Richard Pliscott 
(56); Charles Christian (48): Edward 
Koscioiek (50): John Bnczewski 
(50); John S. Davis (25): Donn'nick 
Sando (3S); Charles Le Valley (31); 
and Harry Meade (33). 

Standing, left to ri,i;Ju. Thomas 
Biiczkowski (25): Leonard Marks 
(26); John Niezgoda (31); Frank 
Mack (25); Joseph Kolodziej (33); 
Andrew Monchak (25): Edward 
Blazejewski, business agent. Area 
One, Carpenters; Clem Zielinski 
(25); Stanley Perry (35); Albert 
Swithers (26); and Charles Masters 
(25). 

Other members honored hat not 
present: Barney Makarczyk 135); 
Herman Fink (30); Matthew Remely 
(26); Michael Hermanofski (30); 
Charles Fisk (25); and John 
Harcharek (34). 





TUCSON, ARIZ. 

Members of Millwrights Local 
1182 received 30-year pins for past 
service at the local's January, 1973, 
meeting. They are, from left to 
right: T. H. Oldham, William Sheehy, 
Sr., John Lucas, John Wells, and 
Earl Moody. 



New York, N.Y. 



fi 




."i 


^ ^ 

Ni 


fc^H 


-"■■'^: 




H^^i 


L. ^ 


il. 


K 1 








1 


i 


H 


■^^KA^H|Hp^' 



Rock Island, III. 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Members of Local 1657 received 
25-year pins at a meeting April 13. 
Those honored included, left to 
right: George Bottigliero president: 
Leroy Adams; Seven Johnson; Tony 
D'Angelo, trustee; Joe Longram, 
treasurer; Lawrence Johnston, 
financial secretary; Joe Savage; John 
Lo Curto, business representative; 
and Howard Hines, conductor. 



ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 

Carpenters Local 166 recently held 
a membership pin presentation with 
General Representative Donald 
Gornnin presenting the awards. 

The picture was taken on January 
19 at the local union's annual 
"Smoker." 

Seated, left to right, are 35-year 
members, Maurice Gabriel, Orville 
Glison, Frank Heiman, Raymond 
Doeckle. Robert McMillan, Clyde 
Gaunt, and W. C. Teel. 

Standing, left to right, are Rep- 
resentative Gorman, Tony LaMantia, 
Francis Thomas, Glen Hallin, 



William V. Hudson, Loren Pease, 
Frank Knapp, and Charles Dunlop, 
president of Local 166. 

Tliird row, from left, are Harold 
Newton, Ivan Baker, and Jack HalL 




KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Earl Grable received his 70-year 
pin from Local 168 President Ed 
Musit, Jr., April 12, when a number 
of Local 168 officers and friends 
joined him at the Indian Creek Nursing 
Home, 6515 We.vt 103rd, Overland 
Park, Kans., in honor of the occasion. 
(Kansas City Labor Beacon photo) 



JUNE, 1973 



23 




25-Year Members 



50-Year Members 



SHENANDOAH, PA. 

Service pins were awarded recently 
at a banquet of Local 709. 

The local is affiliated with Keystone 
District Council of Carpenters, 
comprising more than 2,500 car- 
penters in 20 counties in eastern 
Pennsylvania. 

Local 709 President Nelson Kehler, 
Lavelle, presented pins to the 
metnhers shown in the accompanying 
photographs. 

25-YEAR PINS— Front row, left to 
right, Manuel Garcia, Chas. Gerber, 
Donald Bitting, Boley Domalesky , 
Ralph Gilbert. Back row, left to 
right, Chester Purnell, Paul Gerber, 
Nelson Kehler, Local 709 president, 
Walter Bluvas, Chas. Laccusky, 
William Bendricks. 

Not present, but receiving pins 
were Edward Hanrahan, Thomas 
Jones. Ed. Kalinowski, John Naiko, 
Stanley Nothstein, Augustus Rice. 

30-YEAR PINS— Front row, left 
to right, Edward Wierzalis, John 
Ruth, Robert Ertnine, E. Paul Long, 
Chas. Hoppes, and Harry Blew. 
Back row, left to right, William 
Cresina, Michael Naspinsky, 
Albert Freeman, Tony Yanchulis, 
John Rodgers. Reed Middleton, 
Bernard Thamarus, Harry Haas, and 
Joseph Kutskiel. 

Not present, but receiving pins, 
were Walter Adams, Stephen Ayers, 
Clarence Bachert, Joseph Becker, 
Geo. Bickleman, Clarence Blew, 
HoM-ard Boyer, Wilbur Cooper, 
Joseph Heckman, Chas. Heizenroth, 
Frank Holzenthaler, Thomas James, 
Timothy Murphy, James Neary, 
Vincent ShafJ, Walter Wagner, 
and Harry Zehner. 

50-YEAR PINS — Front row. left to 
right, Roy Yost. Geo. Peiffer, Ralph 
Morgan, Fred Meder. Back row, left 
to right, Raymond Hollister, John 
Menter, William Tempest, Wallace 
Henninger, John Wirtz. 

Not able to be present, but receiving 
pins, were Harry Kleckner, Guy 
Seltzer, Chas. Kline, Samuel Whet- 
stone, Henry Breiner, Thomas Morris, 
Earl Bridygham, Russel Fry, and 
Samuel Morgans. 




30-Year Members 



QUINCY, MASS. 

Carpenters Local 762 recently 
honored George Oster, center, below, 
for his 63 years of membership in 
the Brotherhood and as president 
emeritus of the local union. Shown 
with Oster are Richard SIndtz 




and Arnold Bruce, btisiness 
representative. 

A 50-year pin was presented to 
A. Sinclair McLeod, second from 
left, seated, in the large picture 
below. Twenty-five year pins were 
presented to other members, 
shown in the larger picture. 

In this picture, seated from left, 
are Richard Shultz, A. Sinclair 
McLeod, George A. Oster, Arnold 
G. Bruce, Daniel J. Walsh. Second 
row: George Snow. Grumaldi Pace, 
Benjamin Longabord, Gildo L. 
DiBoiui, Charles M. Cadger, Thomas 
E. Nicholson, and Walter Parker. 
Buck ro-iv: Albert Olsen, Russell 
Erickson, Ole Monson, Peter E. 
Pulkinen, Harold T. Rickard, John 
R. Spanks, and Frank Lamb. 




24 



THE CARPENTER 





i^®Di](|[r*Ug]^ 



'>000 



. . . those members of our Brotherhood who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to public offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "stood 
out from the crowd."" This month, our editorial hat is off to the following: 



HARD HAT AWARD-The symbolic "hard 
hat" of the construction industry was 
doffed in a much merited salute to 
Michael Balen, Sr., business manager of 
the Carpenters District Council of Mil- 
waukee County and Vicinity, Wisconsin, 
recently, as the Allied Construction Em- 
ployers Association staged its 8th annual 
Hard Hat Banquet. 

Balen was designated the 1973 recipi- 
ent of the Peter T. Schoemann Award, 
presented annually to a building trades- 
man who has distinguished himself 
through unselfish service to the construc- 
tion industry. 

First of these awards was presented in 
1967 to John M. Zancanaro. president of 
the Milwaukee Building and Construction 
Trades Council. In subsequent years this 
honor was conferred upon Ralph E. 
Bowes, now retired business manager of 
the Carpenters District Council; Harry W. 
Green. Sr., now retired business manager 
of Roofers Local 65; Herbert N. Peter- 
sen, retired business manager of Painters 
and Allied Workers Local 781; Albert R. 
Couillard. business manager of Bricklay- 
ers Local 8; and Donald LaPrest, business 
manager of Construction Laborers Local 
113. 

The Schoemann Award honors the for- 
mer Milwaukee labor and civic leader 
who now resides in retirement in Wash- 
ington, D.C., after serving as president of 




Michael Balen, business manager for 
the Milwaukee Carpenters District Couu- 
cil and winner of this year's Hard Hat 
Craftsman award was congratulated on 
his achievement by Secretary of Labor 
Peter Brennan, center, and Milwaukee 
Building and Construction Trades Coun- 
cil President John Zancanaro (right). 
Brennan was the principal speaker at the 
Hard Hat Dinner. 



the United Association of Journeymen 
and Helpers of the Plumbing and Pipe 
Fitting Industry. He still retains his 
AFL-CIO vice presidency post and main- 
tains a close association wtih his home- 
town — Milwaukee. 




Left to right: Messrs. Rich, Rice, Cun- 
ningham, and Friend. (See story below) 

FRIENDS IN DEED— With the nearly com- 
pleted General Telephone and Electron- 
ics corporate headquarters building in the 
background, above. Carpenter Thomas 
Friend, right, of Stamford, Conn., uses 
the back of John Cunningham. Carpen- 
ters Local No. 210 business manager, to 
pledge a day"s work to benefit St. Joseph 
Hospital in Stamford while Robert N. 
Rich. President of F. D. Rich Construc- 
tion Co. and Chester G. Rice. President 
of Rice Electric Contracting Co.. smile 
approval. Approximately 150 building 
tradesmen in Stamford worked on their 
day off. May 5, and contributed their 
wages to the community hospital's cur- 
rent ,$3 million expansion campaign. 

The unions also donated the supple- 
mental benefits, while employers con- 
tributed employee benefits and contrac- 
tors matched all wages and benefits. 
Mr. Rice, chairman of the hospital's 
construction and unions campaign com- 
mittee, estimates that $50,000 will be 
raised from the activity and that of sub- 
sequent work days during May. 

CONTEST JUDGE — The new managing edi- 
tor of The Carpenter. Roger Sheldon, 
recently served with Actress Joan Craw- 
ford. Publicist Jim Hagerty. and CBS 
Producer Irene Foley as a judge in the 
1973 National Goodwill Industries Work- 
er of the Year competition. 




3 easy viays to 
bore holes faster 

1. Irwin Speedbor "88" for all electric drills. 
Bores faster in any wood at any angle. Sizes 1/4" 
to »/,i", $.98 each. Va" to Ve", $1.10 each. if,V' 
to 1", $1.15 each. IVe" to IV2", $1.70 eoch. 

2. Irwin No. 22 Micro-Dial expansive bit. Fits 
all hand braces. Bores 35 standard holes, Ve" to 
3". Only $6.30. No. 21 small size bores 19 
standard holes, Va" to 1 3/4". Only $5.60. 

3. Irwin 62T Solid Center hand brace type. 
Gives double-cutfer boring action. Only 16 turns 
to bore 1" holes through 1" v/ood. Sizes 1/4" to 
I V?". 'A" size only $1 .75. 

EVERY IRWIN BIT made of high analysis 
steel, heat tempered, machine-sharpened 
and liighiy poUshed, too. Buy from your 
independent hardware, building supply or 
lumber dealer. 

Strait-Line Chalk Line Reel Box 
only $1.50 for 50 ft. size 
New and improved Irwin self-chalking design. 
Precision mode of aluminum alloy. Pracfrcally 
damage- proof. Fits the pocket, fits 
the hand. 50 ft. and 100 ft. sizes. Get 
Strait-Line Micro-Fine chalk refills and 
Tite-Snap replacement lines, too. Get 
a perfect chalk line every time. 

every hit as good as the name 



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thousands of carpentei-s, buildei's, inside trades, 
etc. have found that HYDROLEVEL pays for 
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JUNE, 1973 



25 




LOCAL UNION NEWS 



Cleveland Local 11 
Marks 90tli Year 

Local 11 of Cleveland, Ohio, was ori- 
ginally organized on April 1, 1881, even 
before the American Federation of La- 
bor, the parent body of the AFL-CIO. 
It was subsequently re-organized on Janu- 
ary 17, 1882, under a charter of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 

This outstanding local union com- 
memorated its 90th birthday, this spring, 
with a large banquet. 

The occasion was marked by the pre- 
sentation of service pins to more than 
300 members of the local union. Serv- 
ing as host for the occasion was Local 
President Robert E. Lavery. Among the 
guests were Second General Vice Presi- 
dent William Konyha, who brought the 
congratulations of General President 
William Sidel! and other General Offic- 
ers; Third District Executive Board 
Member Anthony Ochocki; Frank Mc- 
Namara and Tom Welo, president and 
executive secretary, respectively, of the 
Carpenters District Council. The head 
table was host to several other distin- 
guished civic and labor officials. 




i 




Second General Vice President William 
Konytia accepting the gift of a gavel from 
Local 11 for the United Brotherhood. 
Presenting the gavel is Bob Lavery, presi- 
dent, Local 11. Seated to the left is Ray 
Lavery, recording secretary. 

e 
NOTE TO CORRESPONDENTS: When 
sending material for publication in The 
Carpenter, please identify persons shown 
in all photographs from left to right, 
starting M-itli the front row and reading to 
the back, row by row. Please write or 
print legibly all names and titles. If 
photographs are to be returned, please 
indicate this clearly by letter or memo- 
randum. 




Members of Local 11 and their guests enjoy the anniversary dinner in Cleveland, 




Officers of Local 11 and visitors during the local union's 90th Anniversary cele- 
bration. 

First row. left to right: Ray Kettle, trustee; Tony Sobole, treasurer; Bob Lavery, 
president; Ray Zak, business agent; Franli BonAnno, financial secretary; Ray Lavery, 
recording secretary; and Sam Calo, trustee. 

Second row. Bob Johnson, trustee; Judge John T. Patton; Jim Weisheit, district 
council business agent; Frank Valenta, president, Cleveland AFL-CIO; and William 
Konyha, Second General Vice-President. 



" Officers of Portsmouth, Ohio, Local 



4 



r~ 




The officers of Carptnters Local 437, Portsmouth, Ohio, art shown, left to right: 
Orville Malone, trustee; Orville Shaw, trustee; Warden Ralph Jordan, Conductor 
Roert Keibler, Recording Secretary Norvell E. Davis, Treasurer Charles E. Vander- 
pool, Financial Secretary and Business Representative James A. Cooper, Vice-Presi- 
dent John Keibler, and President Hershell Gullett. Not present was Chester Bowman, 
trustee. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



Russia a 'Most 
Favored Nation'? 

AFL - CIO President George 
Meany. iast month, issued the fol- 
lowing statement on the Soviet 
Union's bar to Jews seeking free- 
dom in other lands: 

The President is waging a cam- 
paign to give the Soviet Union a 
"most favored nation" status under 
U.S. trade laws, contending that 
Russia has relaxed its despicable 
exit tax on Jews seeking freedom 
in Israel. 

Under no present circumstances 
should the Soviet Union be granted 
such a "most favored nation" 
status. 

The President has no solid evi- 
dence that the Soviet Union has 
abolished or will abolish its in- 
famous head tax. There is no evi- 
dence at all that the Soviet Union 
would keep its promise, even if it 
made such a pledge openly and 
publicly, which it has not done. In- 
deed the Soviet Union has an un- 
broken record of breaking its word 
every time she gives it. 

Russia is already a signatory to 
three United Nations declarations 
that prohibit nations from barring 
the emigration of its nationals to 
other countries. 

Russia signed the International 
Convention on the Elimination of 
All Forms of Racial Discrimina- 
tion, which provides for "'the right 
of everyone to leave any country, 
including its own, and to return to 
his own country." The U.N. Char- 
ter and the Declaration of Human 
Rights guarantee such a right. In 
fact, so does the Constitution of 
the Soviet Union. 

But Russia has consistently vio- 
lated its own Constitution and the 
U.N. declarations which it signed. 

Why then should anyone seri- 
ously expect the Soviet Union to 
keep its word this time? 

We hope those senators who 
have already declared their opposi- 
tion to granting the Soviet Union 
"most favored nation" status be- 
cause of the Soviet exit tax will not 
weaken in the face of the White 
House campaign. 

There is no present indication 
that the Soviet Union has earned 
or deserves any special concessions 
paid for by the American taxpayer. 



BOYCOTT REPORT — The Amalgamated 
Clothing Workers strike against Farah. 
manufacturer of men's slacks, etc., is still 
on. Boycott Farah. 

The Oil, Chemical and Atomic Work- 
ers boycott of Shell Oil Company is over. 
The contract settlement was announced 
June 4. 




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JUNE, 1973 



27 



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State Kegler Champions 




The Washington State Council Bowling Tournament was 
held recently. The winning team came from Carpenters Local 
1797, Renton, Wash. The team included: Robert Hoague; Chet 
Serr; Enmiett Budd, team captain; Alvin Hagen; and Jack 
Jones. 



Officers of New York Local 




One of the last pictures taken of the late James Dolan, spe- 
cial assistant to the Brotherhood's director of organization, 
is shown above. It shows him with officers of Local 2440, 
Maintenance Employes of the Franklin Delano Roosevelt 
Veterans Hospital, Montrose, N.Y., at the regular monthly 
meeting, February 8. Dolan is second from right on the front 
row. 

Also shown are, front row, left to right: John DelFrari, 
financial secretary: General Representative Abe H. Saul; John 
Tripken, local president; Dolan; John Murray, treasurer. Back 
row, from left, John Chaplinsky, warden; Frank Satanick, 
steward; Arthur Turner, recording secretary; and Robet Mc- 
Ilwain, vice president. 



'Mr. Carpenter' of Maui Passes 

The Hawaiian Carpenter, official publication of Local 745, 
Honolulu, recently paid warm tribute to a veteran Brother- 
hood business agent, organizer and "enforcer of the union 
contract and protector of the union member and job security" 
— Mamoru "Mamo" Okuda, veteran leader in the islands, who 
died early this year. 

Mamo was known as "Mr. Carpenter" on the island of 
Maui. He organized the island and the construction industry 
there, according to Jean Cote, editor of The Hawaiian Carpen- 
ter. In addition to being Local 745's representative on Maui, 
Mamo headed the jointly-operated offices of the Building 
Trades Council and served the area in many civic capacities. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



Portsmouth, Va., 
BA Is Honored 

Raymond J. Carr, business manager 
of Local 303, Portsmouth, Va., recently 
retired, and a testimonial party was given 
in his honor by his 
co-workers. 

Elected business 
agent of the local 
union in 1946, 
Carr has helped to 
see his fellow 
members through 
many trials. The 
local treasury in 
1946 had $100; 
the scale was $1.10 
per hour. (The 
prevailing scale is now $5.85.) 

The local union, has moved from a 
small rented office to its own building on 
Airline Boulevard. 

During the 26 years of his leadership 
the local was able to progress without 
resort to strike, and it has maintained 
satisfactory relations with contractors. 



Why is there never enough time to do 
it right, but always enough time to do it 
over? 

Leo F. Ehrlich, Local 1996. 
Libertyville, III. 



Expanded Service in Greater St. Louis 




Can- 




EXPANDING SERVICE program of the Greater St. Louis District Council was 
officially inaugurated recently with the swearing in of members to fill newly-created 
staff positions and district council offices vacated when the former officers were 
selected to fill fulltime staff jobs. Swearing in the new representatives was Norman 
Barth, president of the District Council. Taking the oath of office, front row from left 
to right, new Business Representatives Fred Redell, Pat Sweeney, Jim Rudolph and 
Don Brussels, Council Vice President Joe Feast, Warden Walter Strumsky and Trustee 
CJeorge Thornton. 

In background are. District Council officers and staff, from left. Business Repre- 
sentative Ed Thien, Director of Jurisdictional Disputes Larry Daniels, Business Repre- 
sentatives Len TerBrock and Leerie Schaper, Organizing Director Bill Fields, Chief 
Executive Otficer OIlie Langhorst, Floor Layers Local 1310 Business Representative 
Ed Tuholske, Assistant Executive Secretary-Treasurer Carl Reiter (retiring), Assistant 
Executive Secretary-Treasurer elect Pleasant Jenkins, Business Representatives Mike 
Heilich, Hermann Henke, James Watson, Trustee John Morarian and Business Repre- 
sentative Dean Sooter. Not present when photo was taken, Tnistee Harold Hof. 




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JUNE, 1973 



Kenny Davis Honored In Ceremonies 
During Lumber-Saivniill Convention 



Kenneth Davis, director of the Western 
States Organizing Oflfice, retired April 1 
after nearly 40 years of dedicated service 
to the Brotherhood. A host of friends 
honored him on March 29 at a testimo- 
nial dinner in Portland. Oregon, on the 



final afternoon of the Western Council 
Convention. Davis is the last known 
member of the original group which 
formed a union of lumber workers in the 
Northwest in 1933. He served in many 
capacities during four decades of service. 




Mrs. Davis, 
foreground, and 
Retired General 
Treasurer Peter 
Terzick beam as 
GEB Member Lyie 
Hitler congratulate 
Kenny Davis. 




The honoree was presented with a 
framed copy of the first charter granted 
to the Lumber and Sawmill workers 
union in 1935 by General Treasurer 
Charles Nichols. 



Motel Underway 
At Ossining, N.Y. 

Ground breaking took place last fall 
on a new S2-'/^ million Sheraton Motel 
at Eagle Bay, Ossining, N.Y.. and work 
is now progressing rapidly on the foun- 
dation and first-story walls of the new 
structure, the first of a multi-million 
dollar project planned by the co-owners 
of Eagle Bay. Yet to start are several 
luxury 23-story apartment buildings 
which will command an excellent view 
of Eagle Bay, a tributary of the Hudson 
River. 




A picture of early-day logging in the 
Northwest was presented to Davis by 
Clarry Adamson on behalf of the Wil- 
lamette Valley District Council. 



Shown above, left to right, are Wil- 
liam A. Kerr, business representative of 
Local 447. Ossining; Vincent Melian, co- 
owner and project manager; Arminio 
Badia, business representative of Labor- 
ers' Local 505. Ossining; and Kenneth 
Chernik, co-owner. 



Florida Fishing 




Joe Witte. right, a member of Local 
1259, Margate, Fla.. set a new city 
record at Fort Lauderdale when he 
landed this S34-pound Mola Mola (sun- 
fish) after three hours of struggle. He 
was fishing »ith a 40-pound monafila- 
ment line in a 20-foot Seacraft boat. 
The city record was formerly a 425- 
pound Mola Mola. 



CLIC Report 

Continued from Page 14 

long he can receive benefits. Furthermore, 
the Nixon proposals to deny benefits to 
strikers is utterly unacceptable. The AFL- 
CIO wants complete Federal standards 
for unemployment benefits, coverage of 
agricultural workers and extended bene- 
fits for the long-term unemployed. 

Pensions: The Nixon "warmed over" 
proposals go back to 1971 when they 
were then opposed by the AFL-CIO and 
are still opposed. They do nothing for 
those already retired: nothing to guaran- 
tee the integrity of pension funds and 
nothing for workers who have spent a 
lifetime on the job and are now nearing 
retirement. 'Tn sharp contrast."' this so- 
called pension reform provides another 
tax break for the wealthy, the insurance 
companies and the mutual funds. The 
AFL-CIO urged rejection of the pro- 
posals and legislation that will afford 
"real protection for the workers, not new 
tax gimmicks for the wealthy." 

Taxes: The Nixon proposals are no 
more than "an exercise in tokenism," 
says the Council. Major loopholes for 
the wealthy and for the corporations are 
not touched and indeed, are defended; 
the "minimum tax" proposal would still 
let wealthy individuals use certain loop- 
holes to cut their tax burden in half; there 
is little to make multinationals pay their 
taxes. "The Administration has offered 
a program which will 'reform' the tax 
structure to the tune of $900 million; 
'simplify' it at a cost of $400 million and, 
at the same time, add new loopholes cost- 
ing $1 billion. The result — a net loss of 
$600 million. It is a tax package we can- 
not and will not support and we call upon 
Congress to provide Americans with tax 
justice." 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



Member Local 2274 
To Be Ordained 

Louis F. Vallone, Jr., son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Louis Vallone of Pittsburgh, Pa., 
and a member of Local 2274, Heavy 
Construction, re- 
ceived the sacra- 
ment of Holy Or- 
ders and was ele- 
vated to the priest- 
hood last month. 
His father, Lou, is 
a journeyman, and 
his brother, Frank, 
is an apprentice, 
both in Local Un- 
ion 2235, Mill- 
wrights. Fr. Val- 
lone attended St. Basil grade school in 
Carrick; Bishop's Latin School; received 
his B.A. from Duquesne University while 
attending St. Paul Seminary; did work on 
his M.A. at Indiana University, Bloom- 
ington, Indiana and will receive his Mas- 
ter of Divinity degree from St. Meinrad 
School of Theology in St. Meinrad, Indi- 
ana. 

Fr. Vallone received ordination at the 
hands of the Most Reverend Vincent M. 
Leonard, D.D., Bishop of Pittsburgh, at 
St. Paul Cathedral on May 5. 1973, and 
celebrated his First Mass of Thanksgiving 
the following day. May 6, at St. Basil 
Church. 



Wisconsin Local President Creates Inlay 




Vallone 




A wood inlay of the LInifed Brotherhood's emblem was recently presented to the 
Fox River Valley District Council by Arnie Seyfert, president of Local 955, Appleton, 
Wis., who created the plaque. 

Brother Seyfert, who is a member of Local 955, had started this project and then 
suffered a heart attack. On release from the hospital he finished it, and he is now back 
at work. 

Seven different woods were used in the inlay. They are black walnut, rosewood, 
maple, mahogany, cherry, limba, and red oak. Total time involved was 65 hours. 

The men shown are left to right, Jerome Van Sistine, vice-president. Fox River 
Valley District Council, Local 1146, Green Ba>'; John Murray, president. District 
Council, Local 849, Manitowoc; Arnie Seyfert, president. Local 955, Appleton; Jerry 
Jahnke, business manager, financial and recording secretary of District Council. Local 
955, Appleton; and Martin Radtke, treasurer of District Council, Local 3203, Shawano. 



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KC Honors 34 
New Carpenters 

A class of 34 carpenter apprentices 
graduated in Kansas City, Mo., March 
22, in ceremonies at the Alameda Plaza 
Hotel. It was the first formal graduation 
ceremony for apprentices in 15 years. 

Certificates for the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters were presented by Sixth Dis- 
trict General Executive Board Member 
Fred Bull. The US Department of Labor's 
Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training 
was represented by Dale Patton, and the 
Kansas City School Board by Tom Lund- 
berg. 

The principal speaker was Charles 
Allen. Apprentice-Coordinator from the 
United Brotherhood's general office, who 
discussed the theme, "Keeping Pace with 
the Future". Don Meyer was master of 
ceremonies. 

.At the banquet, the apprentices were 
presented by Floyd Price, who gave a 
thumb-nail sketch of each graduate, and 
drew a good response. The banquet was 
sponsored by the Joint Apprenticeship 
Committee for all apprentices who com- 
pleted their training during 1972. 

Those receiving journeyman status, and 
their local unions, were as follows: 

Local 61 — Henry Eck, Phinas Black- 
man, Richard Rademaker, Earl Nelson, 
Joe Dellinger, Robert Ross, Ezra Timber- 






Phinas Blackman receives congratulations from Apprentice Coordinator Floyd 
Price. Standing to the right are Tom Lundberg of the Kansas City School Board, Dale 
Patton of the U.S. Bureau of Apprenticeship and General Executive Board Member 
Fred Bull. 



Apprentice Coordinator Charles Allen 
speaking to the gathering in Kansas City. 



lake, John Palmisano, David Hale, Buddy 
Cloos, Zebediah Young and Roger Price. 

Local 168— John Ohier, Burl Zook, Jr., 
Eldon Becker, Joe Lillich and David 
Hansen. 

Local 1329 — James Amos, Paul Wil- 
liams. Ralph Kelsey, Robert Kunkle, 
James Morton and John Masten. 

Local 1529 — James Fowler. James 
McMahon, Bryon Kelley and Howard 
Knifong. 

Local 1904 — William Brownlee and 
LaVerne Cope. 

Local 2417 — Norman Foltz and Robert 
Kendrick. 

Local 499 — Timothy De Frees 

Local 777 — Jimmy Miller. 

Jigsaw Patterns? 

A reader has written to us deploring 
the shortage of "old time jigsaw cut-out 
patterns." He says that they seem to 
have "disappeared from this earth." 

"When it was a hand, single saw cut. 
they were abundant, but now when they 
can be done with a bench saw, I cannot 
find them." 

If any reader can help him. write to: 
Leon Schensnol, Box 468, Franklin, Mass. 
02038. 



Tacoma Winner 
Is Announced 




The Tacoma, Wash., Millmen Joint 
Apprenticeship Committee held its an- 
nual apprentice contest March 24, with 
two of the five graduating apprentices 
competing. 

Kenneth Cupp of the Tacoma Fixture 
Co., left, and Gary Fortin of the Tacoma 
School District did verj' fine work on a 
small cabinet. The competition was very 
keen, with Gary Fortin coming out as 
the winner. He went on to compete in 
the Washington State contest held in 
Olympia, Washington May 25th and 
26th. 



32 



THE CARPENTER 





APPRENTICESHIP CONTEST CALENDAR 






state 


Date 


Site of Contest 


Carp 


Mill C 


Mill W 


Alabama 


April 27-28 


Decatur, Ala. 


X 






Arizona 


W-4/ 9-16 M-5- 


26 


.\ 


X 


X 


California 


June 21-22-23 


N. Hollywood, Calif. 


X 


X 


X 


Colorado 


June 1-2 


Colorado Springs. Col. 


X 


X 


X 


Connecticut 


June 3 




X 






Delaware 


May 10 


Wilmington, Dela. 


X 






District of Colum 


bia W-6-2— M-6-9 


Training Center 


X 


X 


X 


Florida 


May lO-ll-i; 


St. Petersburg. Fla. 


X 




X 


Hawaii 


May 25-26 


HIC 


X 






Idaho 


May 4-5 


Pocatello, Idaho 


X 






Illinois 


May 23-24 


Springheld, 111. 


X 


X 


X 


Indiana 


June 22-23 


Kokomo. Ind. 


X 


X 




Iowa 


June 22-23 


Cedar Rapids. Iowa 


X 




X 


Kansas 


June 15 




X 




X 


Louisiana 


June 15-16 


Baton Rouge, La. 


X 




X 


Maryland 


June 1 


Columbia Mall, Md. 


X 


X 


X 


Massachusetts 


May 18-19-20 


Worcester, Mass. 


X 


X 




Michigan 


May 18-19 


Detroit, Mich. 


X 




X 


Minnesota 


June 1 


N.E. Minneapolis 


X 






Missouri 


May 16-17 


Sedalia, Mo. 


X 


X 


X 


Montana . 


June 1-2 


Billings, Mont. 


X 






Nebraska 


June 8-9 


Omaha, Neb. 


X 




X 


Nevada 


May 11-12 


Las Vegas. Nev. 


X 






New Jersey 


May 18-19 


Gloucester, N. J. 


X 


X 


X 


New Mexico 


May 25-26 


Albuquerque, N.M. 


X 






New York 


June 4-5-6 


Westbury, L.I., N.Y. 


X 


X 


X 


Ohio 


May 16-17 


Youngstown, Ohio 


X 


X 


X 


Oklahoma 


June 15 


Tulsa, Okla. 


X 






Oregon 


June 1-2 


Eugene, Ore. 


X 


X 


X 


Pennsylvania 


June 1-2 


Hershey, Pa. 


X 


X 


X 


Rhode Island 


April 24 


Providence. R.I. 


X 


X 




South Dakota 


June I5-16(?) 


Sioux Falls, S. Dak. 


X 






Tennessee 


May 4-5 


Chattanooga, Tenn. 


X 




X 


Texas 


April 26-27 


Austin. Tex. 


X 




X 


Utah 


May 5 & 12 




X 






Washington 


May 24-25-26 


Olympia, Wash. 


X 


X 


X 


West Virginia 


May 5 




X 




X 


Wisconsin 


June 8-9 


Oshkosh, Wise. 


X 






Wyoming 


May 19-20 


Cheyenne, Wyo. 


X 






Alberta 


May 11-12 


Calgary 


X 






British Columbia 


May 4-5 


Burnaby 


X 






Manitoba 


June 22-23 


Winnipeg 


X 






Ontario 


June 7-8 


Toronto 


X 




X 








43 


16 


'' 1 



Recent Graduates in Madison County 




I lie nitii abo\e "ere honored at an apprenticeship graduation banquet, April 13. 
They were trained under the program of the District Council of Madison Countj 
and Vicinity, III. 

Sho«n are: Seated, left to right. Jessie Laswell, Dennis Gibbs, Harry Mason. 
Gerald Faulkner, and Rolland Woods. Standing, from left, E. L. Rube, chairman, 
master apprenticeship committee; Jan Freiberg, Gary Eversman, Clyde Frey, Garj' 
Plog, Robert Schneider, John Eckmann, and Rudy Parrish. International Representa- 
tive. 



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JUNE, 1973 



33 



Mil«».t"l»' tUbsTitJ 



C«ARaj OtiLMiLi tH 




The teaching staff of the Suffolk JAC with G«orge Babcock, 
secretarj-treasurer, (front, center) and Clem Napiorski, coordi- 
nator, (back row, extreme right). Back row, left to right, Arthur 
Hansen, Mel Langlois, Bert Redlein, Paul Sayevich, Clem Na- 
piorski. Front row, George Nelson, George Babcock, Jack 
Cavanaugh, and William Stewart. 



Suffolk County 
Picks a Winner! 

The joint apprenticeship committee of 
the Suffolk County, N.Y.. District Coun- 
cil of Carpenters conducted a competi- 
tion in carpentry among volunteers from 
its student body on Saturday, April 14, 
at Ward Melville High School. 

The contest, under the supervision of 
George Babcock, general agent of Suf- 
folk County Carpenters Council, and 
Clem Napiorski, apprenticeship coordi- 
nator, was held for the purpose of de- 
termining a representative to enter the 
New York State Apprenticeship Contest 
scheduled for June 4-7 at Nassau Coli- 
seum. 

The Suffolk County Contest, using the 
same format as the state and national 
contests, included a written test on car- 
pentry on April 7th and concluded with 
the actual use of the tools of the trade 
by seven volunteer apprentices on April 
14th from 8:00 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. 

Apprentice Richard Kampf scored the 
highest among his fellow contestants. 
Richard Kister was chosen in second 
place or alternate. 




Some of the officials of the Suffolk contest. Back row, from 
left to right, Barney Keefer, business agent; Peter Cavanaugh, 
business agent and labor trustee; Irving Sadosky, management 
trustee; Clem Napiorski, coordinator; front row, George 
Babcock, secretary-treasurer of the district council and labor 
trustee; Paul Fierro, management trustee and contest judge; 
James Everett, business agent and labor trustee; and Dominick 
Francis, contest judge. 





"Not boiled tongue again!" 



The Ward Melville High School, East Sctauket, was the contest site, where plenty of 
room was available for the seven contestants. Each contestant had an area of 400 
square feet. The area had plenty of light and was an ideal location for the contest. 



'Escapist Culture' May Change Housing 
Patterns, NAHB Economist Suggests 



Births in the United States had a 
bigger decline in the past two years 
than in the past four decades accord- 
ing to Sanford R. Goodkin. housing 
analyst and president of Sanford R. 
Goodkin Research Corp., Los An- 
geles. 

"In 1972 the population increase 
of only 0.8% was lower than during 
the depression years," Goodkin re- 
cently told the Housing and Urban 
Development Association of Canada 
during a meeting in Toronto. 

"Canada also is strongly following 
the pattern, having actually just fallen 
below the zero population growth 
factor of 2.1 children per 1,000 
women," the housing researcher add- 
ed. "Even though this would not pro- 



duce zero population growth for sev- 
eral decades, the trend is profound in 
terms of its possible effects on housing 
demand and the attitudes of the 
young." 

"At the same time, people are seek- 
ing a quality to their lives, and not 
just shelter." he added. "Populations 
in both countries travel a great deal 
more than their parents and have at- 
tached themselves to an escapist cul- 
ture. What used to be a 'follow the 
sun" syndrome is now 'do your own 
thing" in a recreation vehicle, mobile 
home or in some other part of the 
world. 

"The implications are deep and 
long-lasting. People will demand more 
amenities and a quality of durable 
environment in their communities. 



34 



THE CARPENTER 




Participants in the Texas competition included, from left 
R. J. Rodriguez, millwright apprentice. Local 963. Houston 
S. C. Strunk. business representative. Millwriahl Local 2232 
Houston: Roy Kolojaco. millvvrisht apprentice. Local 2232 
Houston; and George C. Stein, director. Carpenters and Mill 
mights Joint Apprentice Committeee of Houston and vicinit} 
and Member of National Joint Carpentn. Apprenticeship and 
Training Committee. In background: Dexter Ta\Ior, carpen- 
ter apprentice, Local 1266. Austin. 



Left to right. Billy McNatt. coordinator. Dallas Carpenters 
Joint Apprentice Committee: \Mlliam Looney. carpenter ap- 
prentice. Local 198. Dallas: Dexter Ta\Ior. carpenter appren- 
tice. Local 1266, Austin: Eric Dolgener. coordinator. Austin 
Carpenters Joint Apprenticeship Committee: Charlie Gunnels, 
San Antonio Carpenters Joint Apprenticeship Committee: and 
Tom Kingsland, carpenter apprentice. Local 14, San Antonio. 




Texas Picks Entries 
For Int I Contest 

The Texas State Council of Car- 
penters Annual State Apprenticeship Con- 
test was held April 26 and 27, in Austin, 
Texas. 

Roy Kolojaco, Local 2232, Houston, 
placed first in the millwright contest, and 
Dexter Taylor, Local 1266, Austin, placed 
first in the carpenter contest. R. J. Rod- 
riguez. Local 963, Houston, placed sec- 
ond in the millwright contest; William 
Looney. Local 198. Dallas, placed sec- 
ond, and Tom Kingsland, Local 14, San 
Antonio, placed third in the carpentrj 
contest. 

• 

The 1973 Iinernalional Carpenters Ap- 
prenticeship Contest Mill be held at 
Omaha, Nebraska, August 22-25. 




Left to right, front row: Roy Kolojaco. Local 2232: Larry Holt. Local 610: J. W. 
Jackson, president of the Texas State Council of Carpenters and member of State 
Apprenticeship Committee of Carpenters: Bruce HolIe\. Local 1226: Roger Caddell, 
Local 526: C. L. Melton. Local 1884: and John D. Wallace. Jr.. vice president of the 
Texas State Council and Chairman of State Apprenticeship Committee. 

Back row: R. J. Rodriguez. Local 963: G. E. Ziegler. Local 1423: William Looney, 
Local 198: Dexter Taylor. Local 1266: Ralph Warren. Local 977: Shelby Tyler. Local 
2007: Keith Black. Local 753: David M\ers. Local 1822: Stan T. Staton. Local 213; 
Tom Kingsland. Local 14: and John Stull. Local 973. 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^J>>^^S^^>J^»>^a^i^^5^^^^m^y#^#a^^^^^^m^S^ 



'0^» 




Getting The Farah Story 

Two members of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers, on 
Mrike for more than a year against the Farah Manufac- 
turing Company's eight pants plants in Texas and New 
Mexico met with General Secretary R. E. Livingston at 
General Headquarters in Washington. D. C to give hira 
the latest developments in the strike. 

The strikers. Mr. and Mrs. Rodolfo Portillo. are touring 
the countrv urging union members not to buy slacks under 
the Farah label. 

On the first anni\ ersary of the strike, the AFL-CIO 
Executive Council adopted a strongly-worded resolution sup- 
porting the strike and the "Don't Buy larah" campaign. 

The L nited Brotherhood is working with the Amalga- 
mated Clothing W orkers. other AFL-CIO affiliates and state 
and local central bodies on the campaign. 

The Executive Council, in its resolution, declared that 
the strike of the Farah workers "is part of the continuing 
struggle of Mexican-American workers to overcome eco- 
nomic and social repression that makes them vulnerable 
to exploitation b\ emplojers like Farah." 

In the picture, left to right, are Secretary Livingston and 
Mr. and Mrs. Rodolfo Portillo. the husband and wife 
strikers" team. 



JUNE. 1973 



35 




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This is the 18th of a new feature series planned to keep you better 
informed on the meaning of terms related to co//ective bargaining, 
union contracts, and union business. Foi/ow it closely, and your union 
membership v/ill become more meaningful, and your ability to partici' 
pate in decisions which affect your future and security will be strength- 
ened. It was complied by the International Labor Press Assn., and is 
used with permission. 



supplementary unemployment benefits (SUB): Provision for benefits 
to laid-oflf workers, in addition to unemployment insurance. 

suspension: Disciplinary layoff of worker without pay. 

sweetheart agreement: A secret deal with management by a corrupt 
union agent for an inferior contract, made without the knowledge 
of the membership and without genuine collective bargaining. 

swing sliift: In a plant under continuous production, a crew rotating 
among work shifts in order to provide for days off. 

sympathy strilie: One called by workers in support of a labor 
dispute in which they are not directly involved. 



tandem increase: Pay increase given to other groups in plant (usually 
office workers) as result of one negotiated by the production 
workers. 

tal<e-home pay: Earnings for a given payroll period, less deductions 
for withholding taxes, union dues and the like. 

technological unemployment: Result of introduction of new methods 
of production and/ or operation. See automation. 

temporary restraining order: See injunction. 

time study: Procedure by which the actual elapsed time for per- 
forming an operation or subdivisions or elements thereof is de- 
termined by use of a suitable timing device and recorded. The 
procedure usually but not always includes the adjustment of the 
actual time as the result of performance rating to derive the time 
which should be required to perform the task of a workman at a 
standard pace and following a standard method under standard 
conditions. Definition approved by work standardization commit- 
tee of American Society of Engineers. See motion study. 

trade union: Workers organized into a voluntary association to 
further their mutual interests with respect to wages, hours and 
working conditions. 

travel time: Period required to report from a designated point to 
the place of work, compensated for at negotiated rates of pay. 

trick: In a number of trades, a working period. 

trusteeship: Suspension, by an international union, of the officers 
of a local union, with the international taking over control and 
administration of the local. 



36 



THE CARPENTER 




ITsT MEK^rXKES 






L.U. NO. 1 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Edwards, Russell C. 
Helin. Eugene A. 
Horvath, Mike 
Hughes, Paul A. 
Kunowski, John 
Larson, Uno R. 
Misch, Theodore 
Peglow, Fred 
Richardson, John W. 
Schmidt, Raymond 
Sitting, Robert C. 
Yest, Henry 

L.U. NO. 12 
SYRACUSE, N.Y. 

DeAntonio, Alphonse 
Deter, George 
Harmon, David 
Herbick. George 
Reynolds, Douglas 

L.U. NO. 15 
HACKENSACK, NJ. 

King, Richard 
Morss, George 

L.U. NO. 23 
DOVER, N.,I. 

Cooper, Siegal 
Jennings, John 
Olsen, Bejit 

L.U. NO. 30 

NEW LONDON, CONN. 

Arlington, Albert N. 
Dahlgren, Leo 
Desjardins, Philip, Sr. 
Fargo, Wilham F., Sr. 
Sudik, Felix 
Tooker, William 

L.U. NO. 34 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

CALIF. 

Becker, Bruce 
Brock, Louis 
Duffield, Elmer R. 
Noland, Glenn G. 
Scantland, John W. 

L.U. NO. 36 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Bookman, O. Z. 
Hopp, Herbert 
Jensen, Clarence C. 
Moriarty, T. M. 
Murison, G. L. 
Smock. Charles W. 
Walsh, John J. 

L.U. NO. 40 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Driscoll, James F. 
Payne, Robert H. 
Pittman, Cerbett 

L.U. NO. 50 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

McHaffie, Harve J. 

L.U. NO. 61 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Campbell, Charles W. 
Embery, A. L. 
Hogan, John M. 



L.U. NO. 65 

PERTH AMBOY, N.J. 

Carstesen, Arthur 
Keethe, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 91 
RACINE, Wise. 

Christensen, Christ 
Tobias, Louis 
Zimdars, Ferdinand 

L.U. NO. 101 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Blizzard, Marion C. 
Coffey, Chambers 
Farmer, Russell 
Hellmig, Otto H. 
Ruggles, Vernon 
Scanland, C. M. 
Sharpe, Paul H. 
Tabeling, John H., Jr. 

L.U. NO. 119 
NEWARK, N.J. 

Barbarisi, Angelo 
Campbell, George 

L.U. NO. 129 
HAZLETON, PA. 

Drosdick, Joseph J. 

L.U. NO. 132 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Atkins, Bobby, Jr. 
Braut, David W. 
Hogan, Warren H. 
Weishaupt, Leo 

L.U. NO. 133 

TERRE HAUTE, LND. 

Price, Lee 
Ramsey, Fred 

L.U. NO. 134 
MONTREAL, QUE. 

Oiiellet, Leopold 
Strano, John 

L.U. NO. 142 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Bunz, Charles 
Hyland, Thomas 

L.U. NO. 144 
MACON, GA. 

Hall, Roy D. 

L.U. NO. 155 
PLAINFIELD, N.J. 

McDonald, Bernard J. 
Quipp, John J. 
Waite, Otis 

L.U. NO. 181 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Anderson, Albin 
Anderson, Carl T. 
Gorden, Albert 
Sather, Paul 

L.U. NO. 200 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Ashabugh, Earl 
Buckham, John 
Flowers, John F. 



L.U. NO. 225 
ATLANTA, GA. 

Chadwick, Guy M. 
Duck, LeRoyce 
Duff, Harry 
Kilgore, S. E. 
Turner, Spurgion W. 

L.U. NO. 226 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Brickell. Clarence D. 
Hoffard, Andrew 
Manwiller, J. Ji 
Satterlund, Bert 

L.U. NO. 246 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Maikisch, Gustave 

L.U. NO. 262 
SAN JOSE, CALIF. 

Blanco, A. 
Bunda, George 
Burkett, Harold 
Copeland, John A. 
Diedovitch, Alex B. 
Ferreira, E. L. 
Greenquist, Elmer 
Hesse, Martin 
Hudson, Clyde 
Johnson, C. L. 
Kelly, J. F. 
Olson, Julius 
Pizarro, Vincent 
Rivas. Andrew 
Wacholz, E. 
Wallace, Henry 

L.U. NO. 264 
MILWAUKEE, WISC. 

Blechinger, Joseph 
Duame, Paul 
Rickert, Walter 

L.U. NO. 266 
STOCKTON, CALIF. 

Campbell, Ray M. 
Clark, Earl 
Flint, Arthur 
Medley, Claude 
Quyle, Martin E. 

L.U. NO. 278 
WATERTOWN, N.Y. 

Colbert, Kenneth 
Obleman, Miles 

L.U. NO. 319 
ROANOKE,. V A. 

Carper, William L. 
Good, Henry L. 
Gusler, J. R. 
Holston, Robert E. 
Marston, Charlie R. 
Parker, M. C. 
Sarver, L. E. 

L.U. NO. 335 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH 

Branch, Clyde 
Corner, William 
Gooder, Merton G. 
Snyder, Alvin 
Ver Hage, Marvin 



L.U. NO. 340 
HAGERSTOWN, MD. 

Heflin, Leonard R. 
Null, Joseph A. 

L.U. NO. 344 
WAUKESHA, WISC. 

Golemgeski, Lester 

L.U. NO. 359 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Cordisco, Giovanni 

L.U. NO. 361 
DULUTH, MINN. 

Barbo, Willard 
Jacobson, Bernhard 
Trudeau, William 

L.U. NO. 366 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Berman, Barnet 
DePolo, Joseph 
Katz, Leuis 
McDonald, John 
Raus, Giuseppe 

L.U. NO. 403 
ALEXANDRIA, LA. 

Miller, Coy 

L.U. NO. 414 
NANTICOKE, PA. 

Davis, John S. 

L.U. NO. 440 
BUFFALO, N.Y. 

Brock, Robert A. 
Hagen, Frederick 
Roberts, John E., Sr. 

L.U. NO. 486 
BAYONNE, N.J. 

Brose, Walter 
Olsen, Thomas 
Romano, Charles 
Roskos, Frank 
Smith, Herman 

L.U. NO. 488 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Anderson, C. Albert 
Bjork, Ture S. 
Blomquist, William 
Bursee, Harry 
Chudakewich, Anton 
Daly, Frank 
DeLeon, Jesus 
Eide, Harry 
Guaglianone, Carlo 
Hook, William 
Johansen, Peter 
Larka, Gunnar 
Mayer, Fredrick 
Schmidt, Henry 
Stabsky, Henry 
Thompson. Tom 
Villafranca, Gennero 
Weiner, Max 

L.LJ. NO. 522 
DURHAM, N.C. 

McLamb, Carlie A. 



L.U. NO. 531 

ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. 

Andreen, Albert C. 
Coleman, Joseph B. 
Mortensen, Peter 

L.U. NO. 562 
EVERETT, WASH. 

Ekenes, Henry 
Geiger. Louis J. 
Jolliffe, John K. 
Nelson, August R. 
Walters, Harry J. 

L.U. NO. 576 

PINE BLUFF, ARK. 

Brinson, Clyde W. 
Cole, Earl J. 
Elhs, Ray M. 
Gant, A. W. 
Hackelton, W. D. 
Paschall, Morris 
Shollmier, Richard 
Slocum, K. S. 
Webb, W. W. 
White, M. L. 

L.U. NO. 620 
MADISON, N.J. 

Altiere, Edward 
Denman, Aaron 
Finnerty, Ambrose 
Gilligan, Edward 
Huys, Louis 
Johnson, Axel 
Knox, Daniel 
Nally, Edward 
Sherrin, Sidney 

L.U. NO. 621 
BANGOR, ME. 

Bouchard, Roland 
Brewer, Maynard 
Hammond, Bernard R. 

L.U. NO. 626 
WILMINGTON, DEL. 

French, Leonard 
Short, Ira D. 

L.U. NO. 657 
SHEBOYGAN, WISC. 

Keller, William 
Stranburg, John 

L.U. NO. 665 
AMARUXO, TEX. 

Bartley, S. L. 
Bradbeny, Harold 
Dalton, Hugh 
Flanagan, E. E. 
Patterson, Lloyd 

L.U. NO. 745 
HONOLULU, HAWAU 

Okuda, Mamoru 
Lokunaga, Richard S. 
Yamada, R.aymond 
Yamada, Tadao 
Yoshimoto. Hideo 

L.U. NO. 770 
YAKIMA, WASH. 

Anderson. Carl 

Continued on page 38 



JUNE, 1973 



37 



In Memoriam, concluded 



Barker, Wayne 
Munsel, Claude W. 
Shuell, Willard 

L.U. NO. 925 
SALINAS, CALIF. 

Bissett, Tom 
Brown. Romie 
Jenkins. Leroy 

L.U. NO. 944 

SAN BERNARDINO, 

CALIF. 

Bathurst, Lawrence 
Coley. Herbert 
Find. Roy 
Ford, Elmer 
Gatten, Thomas P. 
Johnson, Harry L. 
McMillin, David 
Mayo, Finley 
Morris, Preston 
Wiemholt, Fred 

L.U. NO. 948 
SIOUX CITY, IOWA 

VaDeer, Harry L. 

L.U. NO. 976 
MARION, OHIO 

Longbrake, Lowell 

L.U. NO. 977 
WICHITA FALLS, TEX. 

Nichols, Raymond E. 

L.U. NO. 978 
SPRINGFIELD, MO. 

Garbee. Edward H. 
Hiller, Fred H. 
Williams. Percy H. 
Taylor. Hugh J, 

L.U. NO. 1006 

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. 

Brustowicz, Louis 
Danielczyk, Vincent 
Jackson, Harry 
Mundy, Fred 
Olsen, Bent 

L.U. NO. 1013 
BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 

Bjorklund, Carl G. 

L.U. NO. 1093 
GLENCOVE, N.Y. 

Feet, WiUiam A. 
Stango, Gennaro 

L.U. NO. 1098 
BATON ROUGE, LA. 

Austin, John C. 
Kern, Aldon 
Matherene. Theodore B. 



L.U. NO. 1149 
SAN FRANCISCO, 
CALIF. 

Berge, Andrew 
Clutts, Ray 
Dunn, John L. 
Gist. John C. 
Laharty, William 
Maloney, Francis 

L.U. NO. 1162 
COLLEGE POINT, NY. 

Johnson, Fred 

L.U. NO. 1166 
FREMONT, OHIO 

Ringlein, Cornelius 

L.U. NO. 1185 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Giannecchini, Albert J. 
Mossey, Charles C. 
Peterson, Russell E. 

L.U. NO. 1266 
AUSTIN, TEX. 

Jones, Emanuel L. 

LU. NO. 1302 

NEW LONDON, CONN. 

Balbat, Boris 
Furstenberg, Anthony 

L.U. NO. 1323 
MONTEREY, CALIF. 

Kuehn, Paul 

LU. NO. 1331 
BARNSTABLE CO., 
MASS. 

Ferguson, Howard E. 

L.U. NO. 1367 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Anderson, Gustave 

L.U. NO. 1386 
ST. JOHN, N.B. 

Cameron, Earnest 
Gogan, William 
Lambert, James 
Mallory, Murray 
Truesdale, Harvey 

LU. NO. 1397 

N. HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. 

Brive, Adolf 

L.U. NO. 1456 
NEW YORK, NY. 

Andos, Edward 
Forsblom, Emil 
Grechanik. Nikita 
Gregel, Louis 



LEGACIES OF LONG SERVICE 

Several senior members of the United Broth- 
erhood have passed on in recent months who 
deserve special mention for their long devotion 
to the union cause. They include: 
. Local 545 — Elmer G. Hallberg, 53-year 
member 
Local 993 — R. G. Dickhoiise, 61-year 

member 
Local 1285--Harry J. Schleicher, Sr.. 55-year 

member 
Local 229 — William Palmer, 50-year member 



Fredrikson, Fredrik 
Knudsen, Peder 
Mahon, Michael 
Schultz, Fritz 
Waaland, Trygve 

L.U. NO. 1471 
JACKSON, MISS. 

Walker, J. D. 
Williams, M. L. 

L.U. NO. 1541 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 

Anderson, Lome C. 

L.U. NO. 1699 
PASCO, WASH. 

ColUns, Ed 

L.U. NO. 1846 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Daniels, Denver A. 
Montalbano, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 1849 
PASCO, WASH. 

Byse, George 
Combs, Banks 
Heintz, Gene 
Larsen, Lowell 
Mott, Gene 

L.U. NO. 1913 
SAN FERNANDO, 
CALIF. 

Abel, Albert C. 
Avery, Edson 
Brenton, William P. 
Chrisman, Claude 
Doering, Ben F. 
Durham, Harry 
Durran, Neil 
Gentry, Charles W. 
Holladay, Don B. 
Holland, Clyde M. 
Holmes, A. R. 
Jenkins, Harvey 
Johnson. Walter E. 
Jones, William C. 
Kahnowski, Paul 
Kanaly, Lawrence A. 
Kelly, George E. 
King. Carroll T, 
Koska, Robert L. 
Logan, William 
McMullens, Edgar W. 
Martinsen, Magnus 
Morris, Myron J. 
Novak, Carl 
O'Connell, J. H. 
Overall, A. G. 
Pogue, Nelson 
Ramsey, John Jr. 
Riendeau. William J. 
Roberts, Bowen C. 
Starr. Olaaf 
Threedouble, Ed 
Warren, Ben M. 
Wilson, Ward B. 
Zeigler, John H. 

L.U. NO. 1922 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Baldauf. .A.doIph 
Fron, Joseph 
Kuellmer, John 
Larsen, Charles E. 
Matevich, Joe 
Neufeld, Lawrence 
Snopek, Phillip F. 
Tersinor. Frank 
Zawistowski, Alex 



L.U. NO. 1974 
ELLENSBURG, WASH. 

Rogowski, Mike 

L.U. NO. 2046 
MARTINEZ, CALIF. 

Dotters, L. W. 
Ebert, Alfred 
Hand, Aaron Q. 
Sechiatano, Sal 

L.U. NO. 2235 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Johns, Alexander F.. Sr. 

L.U. NO. 2274 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Gardner, Harry P. 



Griebel, Charles 
Johnson, McClelland B. 
Legnosky, Alex 
Mattison, WiUiam Sr. 
Norris, Anthony 
Plauny, Joseph S. 
Smith, Lester W. 
Withrow, Thomas 

L.U. NO. 2762 
NORTH FORK, CALIF. 

Lee, Wilbur A. 



L.U. NO. 3127 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Smith, Tafiele 



LAKEUND MEMORIAM 

Fred Mellon of Local No. 624, Brock- 
ton, Ma.S5., died April 6, 1973. He was 
buried in the Home Cemetery. 

• 
Alman Hansen of Local No. 842, Jersey 
City. N.J.. died April 7, 1973. His body 
was cremated and buried in the Home 
Cemetery. 

• 
Thomsa J. Petersen, of Local No. 1367, 
Chicago, 111., died April 11. 1973. His 
body was cremated and buried in the 
Home Cemetery. 



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38 



THE CARPENTER 



Wood Framing Could Ease 
Energy Crisis, Says Report 



Wood frame construction can help 
ease the nation's energy crisis by de- 
creasing heating and cooling require- 
ments in residential and commercial 
structures, according to a report by the 
Southern Forest Products Association. 

The "energy crisis" became an 
alarming reality in past weeks, as 
America's fuel tanks dipped toward the 
empty mark in meeting the surge of 
demand brought on by bitter cold 
weather. Shortages of oil and natural 
gas forced factory shutdowns to con- 
serve dwindling fuel for chilled home- 
owners. 

Use of lumber framing in residential 
and other buildings, the Southern For- 
est Products Association points out, 
can slow the energy drain and thus 
contribute to energy conservation na- 
tionwide. 

The SFPA report notes that wood 
frame construction cuts the demand 
for energy in two ways. First, it takes 
less energy to produce wood building 
products. And second, wood is the 
best insulator of all building materials, 
resulting in less energy to run heaters 
and air-conditioners. 

Trees use only the energy of the 
sun to grow, the SFPA report empha- 
sizes. Then at the sawmill, after har- 
vesting, only 430 kilowatt hours of 
electricity or its equivalent is required 
to produce a ton of lumber. In con- 
trast, a ton of steel consumes 2,700 
kilowatt hours, a ton of aluminum 
17,000 kwh. 

Wood is also a natural insulator, 
with millions of tiny air cells trapped 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 


Audel. Theodore 


39 


Berger Instruments 


12 


Chicago Technical College . . 


27 


Craftsman Book Co 


10 


DeSoto Tool Co 


25 


Eliason Stair Gauge Co 


38 


Estwing Manufacturing 


28 


Foley Manufacturing 


31 


Goldblatt Tool Co 


33 


Irwin Auger Bit Co 


25 


Locksmithing Institute 


15 


No. Amer. Sch. of Surveying 


39 


Skil Corporation 


29 


Stanley Power Tools . .back cover | 


Vaughan and Bushnell 


36 



within its structure providing a barrier 
against heat and cold. 

Data from the American Society of 
Heating, Refrigerating and Air Condi- 
tioning Engineers show that one inch 
of wood is four times as efficient an 
insulator as cinder block, six times as 
efficient as brick, 15 times as efficient 
as concrete or stone, 400 times as effi- 
cient as steel, and 1,770 times as effi- 
cient as aluminum. 

In studies conducted by the National 
Association of Home Builders Re- 
search Foundation, Inc., a wood frame 
house used 23 percent less heat energy 
than an identical masonry house during 
the cold season, and 16 percent less 
energy during the air - conditioning 
season. 

Operating costs for the wood frame 
house were also lower, reflecting a total 
savings of .$56 a year. 

Improving the thermal insulation of 
building materials, the SFPA report 
continues, thus results in significant 
savings in energy and operating costs, 
not to mention greater comfort and 
liveability. 

And by conserving energy, the re- 
port adds, air pollution is reduced. An 
estimated 10 percent of air pollutants 
come from space heating, which dumps 
some I 5 million tons of pollutants into 
the air each year. 

Another environmental benefit 
comes from the fact that among the 
major raw material resources, wood 
alone is biodegradable. Inorganic ma- 
terials call for yet additional energy 
drains to recycle or otherwise dispose 
of them when use has been terminated. 

The use of wood for house framing 
and other purposes, the Southern 
Forest Products Association stresses, 
would substantially extend the supply 
of depletable resources such as gas, 
petroleum, coal, iron ore and bauxite. 

In a recent report entitled '"The 
Potential for Energy Conservation." 
the President's Office of Emergency 
Preparedness concluded that for en- 
ergy conservation "the most significant 
opportunity in the residential sector 
lies in improved insulation of houses." 

This statement takes on added mean- 
ing in view of OEP's estimate that 
some 13.1 million new households will 
be created during the 70s, with house- 
hold heating and cooling accounting 
for two-thirds of the total projected 
energy consumption. 



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JUNE, 1973 



39 



IN CONCLUSION 



THE CONSUMER 
IS HOLDING 

THE BAG IN THE 
ENERGY CRISIS 



A Comprehensive Natural 

Resources and Energy Policy 

Is Needed Now 



IB One of the most complex issues facing the 
United States today is what the newspapers are 
now calling "The Energy Crisis". 

It has been building up into a mixed bag of 
makeshift legislation and government edicts since 
World War II. What we have before us in this 
summer of 1973 is a collection of stop-gap meas- 
ures which protect the profits of the major oil 
companies but postpone the inevitable decisions 
which must be reached on behalf of the consum- 
ing population itself. The time is long overdue 
when the Federal government and the states must 
formulate a lasting and comprehensive energy and 
natural resources policy — not only for our own 
benefit but for the good of our children and for 
generations of world citizens to come. 

With less than 6% of the world's population, 
the United States guzzled one-third of the earth's 
energy production in 1972. The consumption of 
heating oil has gone up 189c in the past ten 
years; gasoline use has jumped 50%. Accord- 
ing to some estimates, at currently accelerating 
rates of consumption, the nation will exhaust 
domestic supplies of petroleum in another 
decade! 



The greed of some industrialists and most fuel 
producers has been so great that they push their 
research and merchandising experts to find new 
markets and new luxury uses for energy at the 
same time they are piously pleading that they 
are able to regulate themselves in the area of 
resource conservation. We have electrically- 
powered knives, scissors, and charcoal starters, 
and we are urged to place eternal flames of nat- 
ural gas in post lamps at the entrances to our 
homes. It's like watching Nero fiddle while Rome 
bums. 

One of the ironic aspects of this energy crisis 
is the fact that we must eventually cut back on 
some of the affluent frills of today's "life styles", 
which we have worked so hard to achieve, in 
order to conserve energy for the essentials of 
modern living and modern industry. 

The Associated General Contractors v.'arned. 
last month, that employment in the construction 
industry is likely to suffer heavily unless fuel 
shortages are corrected. The president of AGC 
told the press that hundreds of construction pro- 
grams will be stopped for lack of fuel to move 
construction machinery unless contractors get 
fuel commitments for jobs to start during the 
next 90 days. 

Here is where the energy crisis hits the very 
heart of America. When the buses stop and the 
mail trucks slow down and the flames in the fur- 
naces of industry are turned low, then even the 
wealthy oil producers and the tycoons of the 
energy conglomerates must ask themselves 
whether it is better to declare an excessive divi- 
dend on the company stock through massive sales 
of precious fuel now or to practice moderation 
and conserve the resources of this planet for the 
long-range dividends which will eventually ac- 
crue to the benefit of the entire population of this 
nation. 

The activities of some elements of the energy- 
producing industry cause us to wonder how real 
some aspects of the energy crisis really are. 

Gas and electric utilities have been using the 
present crisis atmosphere to request increases in 
the prices of energy, setting the stage for even 
greater pressures on the cost of living. 

Fuel shortages are being used by the com- 
panies to remove Federal regulation over natural 
gas rates at the well-head. 

The petroleum industry is asking for a com- 
bination of increased government subsidies, re- 
tention of oil import quotas, and much more. 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



Labor has repeatedly called for a comprehen- 
sive Federal natural resources and energy policy. 
When the AFL-CIO Executive Council met in 
Florida in February and again in Washington 
last month, we issued strong statements on the 
energy situation. We urged that an energy re- 
sources policy be formulated which will "foster 
and sustain full employment, protect and pre- 
serve the environment, benefit the consumer, pre- 
vent monopoly, and eliminate wasteful and mu- 
tually contradictory activities among existing Fed- 
eral resources agencies." 

The council's recommendations bear careful 
consideration by every concerned citizen. They 
are as follows: 

1. We reiterate our proposal for creation of a 
Council on National Energy Policy. 

2. We again ask for creation of TVA-type 
development agencies in the field of raw materials 
and energy fuels, including oil shale found on the 
federal domain to develop new and expand exist- 
ing supplies, overcome technological and environ- 
mental problems associated with the extraction 
and processing of oil shale and provide a cost 
yardstick for the benefit of consumers. 

3. We again call for a program to create a 
large-scale bulk-electric power supply for the 
United States through a truly national power 
grid system. Such a system should be open to all 
utilities, regulated by the Federal government and 
operated with full environmental safeguards. 

4. We will oppose efforts in the Congress to 
remove the interstate natural gas pipeline com- 
panies from regulation under the Natural Gas 
Act. 

5. We urge a full-scale investigation by the ap- 
propriate committees of the Congress of the so- 
called energy crisis, to determine the facts, na- 
ture, exent of the problem and proposed solu- 
tions. 

6. We cannot emphasize too strongly the need 
for broad-scale federal research on methods to 
develop new sources of raw materials and energy 
fuels — including advanced nuclear power tech- 
niques and oil shale development, electric power 
technology, conservation of fuels and energy and 
modes of transportation. 

7. We vigorously oppose fragmented ap- 
proaches to the solid waste problem. We support 



development of efficient, economical methods of 
collection, separation, recycling and disposal of 
the 4.3 billion tons of solid wastes produced an- 
nually in this country. 

8. We urge amendments to the Resource Re- 
covery Act to require recording and reporting 
by public and private entities of the kinds, quan- 
tities and disposal methods used for solid wastes; 
to require federal regulation of toxic solid wastes; 
regional solid waste programs, and a heightened 
campaign among union members to step up their 
efforts to eliminate littering. 

I strongly urge the implementation of these rec- 
ommendations in the current session of Congress. 





Model 76 
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P.S.: made by the same Stanley 



If that's not enough reason to buy a Stanley, con- 
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that makes the finest hand tools. 



STANLEY 



JULY 1973 






FOUNDED 1881 




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GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Herbert C. Skinner 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D.C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

William Konyha 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D.C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 

Charles E. Nichols 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Patrick J. Campbell 

130 North Main Street 

New City, Rockland Co., New York 

10956 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 

130 Mountain Avenue 
Springfield, New Jersey 07081 

Third District, Anthony Ochocki 
18400 Grand River Avenue, 
Detroit, Michigan 48223 

Fourth District, Harold E. Lewis 

2970 Peachtree Rd., N.W., Suite 300 
Atlanta, Ga. 30305 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
2800 Selkirk Drive 
Burnsville, Minn. 55378 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 
Glenbrook Center West — Suite 501 
1140 N.W. 63rd Street 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73116 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, M. B. Bryant 

Forum Building, 9th and K Streets 

Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 

2418 Central Avenue 

Windsor, Ontario, Canada 

Tenth District, Eldon T. Staley 

4706 W. Saanich Rd. 

RR #3, Victoria, B. C. 




WiLLUM Sidell, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondeiice for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

If your local union wishes to list de- 
ceased members in the "In Memoriam" 
page of The Carpenter, it is necessary 
that a specific request be directed to the 
editor. 



In processing complaints, the only 
names which the financial secretary needs 
to send in are the names of members 
who are NOT receiving the magazine. 
In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. Members who die or are sus- 
pended are automatically dropped from 
the mailing list of The Carpenter. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPEISTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine, which requires 
six to eight weelfs. However this does not advise your own local union of 
your address change. You must notify your local union by some other 
method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME. 



Local No. . 

Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS. 



City 



State or Province 



ZIP Code 



THE 



(§/A\[I2[?' 




^UBOfl PRESSro 



VOLUME XCIII NO. 7 JULY, 1973 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

AFL-CIO LABOR Studies Center Prepares Trade Unionists 2 

Brotherhood Signs Mutual-Understanding Pact with IWA 4 

Hawaii Local Dedicates New Headquarters 5 

Regional Seminars Begin This Month 7 

Craft and Industrial Skills Featured at Ul Show 8 

Building Trades, Employers Ink Disputes Plan 10 

Unions, Westinghouse Agree; GE Pact Oked 10 

Labor Movement Victim of Own Success 11 

Vacation Stamp Plan Checks Fringe Benefits 39 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 6 

Canadian Report Morden Lazarus 12 

Local Union News 14 

Plane Gossip 18 

Service to the Brotherhood 19 

Apprenticeship and Training 25 

CLIC Report 32 

What's New? 34 

Your Union Dictionary, No. 19 36 

In Memoriam 37 

In Conclusion William Sidell 40 



POSTMASTERS, ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave.. N.E., Washington, 0. C. 20018. by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20? in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

The Capitol of the United States, 
with all of its alabaster, architectural 
stateliness, symbolizes freedom for 
more than 200 million Americans. 

For the many summer visitors who 
cross its green lawns and walk its 
hallowed halls, the Capitol offers a 
sense of history . . . almost two cen- 
turies of democratic freedom . . . 
a government of the people, by the 
people, and for the people. 

In the foreground of our cover pic- 
ture, a brooding, war-weary General 
Ulysses S. Grant is portrayed in a 
dramatic monument. This statue is 
one of several which are placed at 
strategic points on the Capitol 
grounds. Inside the building itself, 
Statuary Hall has space for the dis- 
play of statues of heroic sons of each 
of the 50 states. 

At the time our cover picture was 
taken, the Architect of the Capitol 
had begun to add big timber braces 
between the columns on the West 
Front of the structure. All of the 
columns are now braced, awaiting 
settlement of a long controversy as 
to whether or not the West Front 
should be extended. (See story on 
Page 11.) — Photo by Louis C. 
Williams 

NOTE: Readers who would like copies 
of this cover immarred by a mailing label 
may obtain them by sending lOi in coin 
to cover mailing costs to the Editor, The 
CARPENTER, 101 Constitution Ave., 
N.W., Washington, D.C. 20001. 




[flMJiOi 







An architect's bird's-eye view of tlie AFL-CIO Labor Studies 
Center campus in Silver Spring, Maryland. Prepared by the 
firm of Kanistra, Abrash, Diclierson & Associates of Reston, 
Va., the drawing shows at (A) the main administration building, 
(B) a dormitory and cafeteria, (C) multipurpose classrooms 
und/or gymnasium, (D) and (Dl) dormitories, and (E) and 
(El) more classrooms. The entrance to the campus is from the 
right at New Hampshire Avenue. 



New AFL-CIO 
Studies Center Takes 
The Hard Knocks Out 
Of Labor's Book Larnin' 



■ There was a time, about two genera- 
tions ago, when you could write the 
text of a labor-management agreement 
on a single sheet of paper. In fact, 
we've seen one which was handwritten 
on the back of a boss's calling card 
and which stated simply: "I hereby 
agree to an eight-hour day." 

Those days are far behind us. To- 
day's contracts call for escalators, 
fringe benefits, safety clauses, union 
label clauses, wage differentials, job 
evaluations, and much more. 

It takes a college professor — one 
who has also been through "the school 
of hard knocks," that is — to negotiate 
effectively with the Ivy League boys 
on the other side of the bargaining 
table. 

Organized labor, for many years, 
attempted to overcome its "book- 
larnin' " handicaps with seminars and 
short courses, with training manuals 
and educational materials. But more 
intensive and formalized training was 
still needed for many of labor's spe- 
cialists. 

Finally, In the 1960's the AFL-CIO 
resolved to established its own school 



THE CARPENTER 



for labor representatives. A little more 
than three years ago, the AFL-CIO 
founded the Labor Studies Center, an 
institution which moved to its own 
campus just a few weeks ago. 

The goals of the Labor Studies Cen- 
ter are to assist union leaders to de- 
velop their technical skills; buttress 
these skills through a firm grounding 
in the social sciences and humanities 
provide information on the labor 
movement to all parts of the com- 
munity; and involve students in the 
problems of the total labor movement 
and thus strengthen all affiliated 
organizations. 

Since its inception in the fall of 
1969, the Labor Studies Center has 
been housed in temporary quarters in 
downtown Washington, D.C. In May 
of this year, however, it opened the 
doors of its permanent home in the 
Maryland suburbs of Washington, thus 
bringing to realization a long held 
dream of the American labor move- 
ment — housing its own labor college 
in a campus setting. 

The center represents an investment 
of about $7 million for the AFL-CIO, 
with almost $6 million of that for the 
new location — $2.5 million for the 
land purchase and $3.4 million for 
renovation and new construction over 
a period of several years. Annual 
operating expenditures have ranged 
from $224,000 the first year to 
$479,000 for the third year. 

Classes are run in seminar style, 
with free discussion and questioning. 
At the new center in Silver Spring, 
Md.. enrollment in each course will 
be limited to 25, as it was formerly, 
and no more than two representatives 
from the same international union 
may enroll. The campus will feature 
facilities for 100 resident students 
which includes administration, class- 
room, conference and domitory build- 
ings, as well as a dining center and 
auditorium. Recreational facilities — 
a swimming pool, a putting green, a 
baseball diamond and basketball, vol- 
leyball and tennis courts — will also 
be available. 

The courses at the center have been 
geared primarily for full-time inter- 
national and local staff, the logical 
first level to whom this type of educa- 
tion could be offered. Fred K. Hoeh- 
ler, the center's director, anticipates 
that at the new expanded facility, it 
will be possible to offer courses for 
different levels of trade union leader- 
ship. 

The center's policy has been that 

tuition and other related educational 

expenses are covered by the center. 

Continued on page 16 

JULY, 1973 




AFL-CIO President Gtorye iMeaii.v and General President Sldell consider 
the strength of the joists in a domitory building, as members of the 
AFL-CIO Executive Council toured the center during renovation work 
early this year. 




Above: The grounds of the former Calliolic stuiiiiarv were inspected by 
AFL-CIO Executive Council members during the tour. Below: One of 
many groups which have received specialized training under the center's 
year-round program. The Brotherhood's research director, Nick Loope, 
was among this group. (Standing, second from left.) 




Participants in the 
pact signing. 
(Identifications at 
tlie bottom of the 
page.) 




Brotherhood Signs 
Mutual-Understanding Pact with IWA 

Agreement would allay jurisdictional disputes in the forest products industry 



■ In a move that will improxe 
the unionization, wages and working 
conditions of logging operations, 
plywood plants, sawmills and other 
forest-products industries through- 
out the nation, the two most in- 
fluential labor organizations in this 
field have signed an understanding 
of mutual assistance. 

General President William Sidell 
of the United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters and Joiners of America and 
President Ronald F. Roley of the 
International Woodworkers of 
America — AFL-CIO affiliates which 
long have competed with each other 
in the jurisdictional area that also 
mcludes general woodwork, cabi- 
nets, mobile trailers, modular hous- 
ing and furniture manufacture — 
jointly announced a sweeping, co- 
operation pact that goes far beyond 
non-raiding of members. 

After considerable discussion, the 
Carpenters and the IWA, formally 
decided to work together to tr}' to 
solve a variety of common problems 
throughout the United States, par- 
ticularly in organizing new opera- 
tions and coordinated collective bar- 
gaining at plants already organized. 



If any third-party assistance 
should be required, the IWA and 
Carpenters agreed that it would be 
requested only from the AFL-CIO, 
with no participation from outside 
the trade union family. 

The Understanding of Mutual As- 
sistance points out that the forest- 
products industries' large and fast 
growth is marked by diversification 
of products throughout the nation, 
with massive conglomerates gobbling 
up independent companies and 
dovetailing them into their corporate 
structure in such a way as to best 
suit their profit-producing pattern. 

With this growth have come prac- 
tices and policies intended to check 
the advance of trade unionism and 



to weaken the effectiveness of col- 
lective bargaining where unions al- 
ready exist, such as location of 
plants in so-called '"right-to-work" 
states and employment of profes- 
sionals trained to frustrate workers' 
attempts to unionize. 

The two organizations recognize 
that part of the problem also has 
been the lack of trade union co- 
ordination and the difficulty of trade 
unionism to keep pace with the 
growth of the industry. 

In the implementation of the Un- 
derstanding, specific procedures for 
strategy, coordination of collective 
bargaining information and organi- 
zational steps were formally ap- 
Continued on page 38 



Brotherhood and IWA leaders shown at the top of the page include: Front row, 
from left — Peter Hager, regional director. Western States: Jim Bledsoe, executive 
secretary. Western Council: Ron Roley. international president, IWA; William 
Sidell, general president. UBC: A. M. Collins, secretary treasurer, IWA, Region 
5; and J. W. Baiighman, president-regional director, IWA. Region 5. 

Back row — Ross Biirnell. president-director. Region 4, IWA; Leonrad Planter, 
president-director. Region 3, IWA: Curves Simmons, regional director. Southwest, 
UBC: A. O. McKinney, regional director. Southern States. UBC: Keith Johnson, 
vice president and director of organization. IWA; Anthony Ochocki, board member. 
Third District. UBC; James Craven, assistant director of organization. IWA; Boh 
Schlosser, assistant director of organization. IWA; and Floyd Doolittle, executive 
Secretary, Southern Council of Industrial Workers. 



THE CARPENTER 



One of Brotherhood's Largest Local Unions, 
Local 745, Hawaii, Dedicates New Headquarters 



■ One of the largest local unions 
in the United Brotherhood, Local 
745, Honolulu, Hawaii — with 5.773 
members working throughout the 
islands of Hawaii and the Pacific 
— dedicated a new $1 miUion head- 
quarters building May 19th. 

An audience of more than 150 
persons assembled in Kalihi on the 
island of Oahu for the ceremonies. 

General President William Sidell 
was the main speaker. Hawaii's 
Lieutenant Governor George Ari- 
voshi spoke on behalf of Governor 
John Burns. He called the new 
building a tribute to Local 745 and 
a tribute to the State of Hawaii. 



Among the dignitaries on hand 
were Congressman Spark Matsuna- 
ga. State Senate President David C. 
McClung, and House Speaker Ta- 
dao Beppu. 

Several international labor lead- 
ers, who were attending a meeting 
of the AFL-CIO Building Trades 
Executive Council in Hawaii, were 
visitors during the dedication cere- 
monies. 

General President Sidell ex- 
pressed pride in the tremendous 
growth of Local 745. "In Hawaii 
it's almost all union — certainly a 
great achievement," he commented. 

He described how the local union 
had grown from its humble begin- 



ning in 1902 to its present stature 
in the Brotherhood. He said that 
the most substantial gains were 
made after 1956, when Charles 
Nichols, who was then a West 
Coast organizer and is now the 
General Treasurer, came to Hawaii. 
The General President pointed out 
that Local 745 had only 190 mem- 
bers when Nichols arrived. 

The General Treasurer was 
among the guests at the dedication 
ceremonies. 

Local President Masayuki Yama- 
moto and Financial Secretary Stan- 
ley Yanagi headed the local group 
welcoming state and mainland 
visitors. ■ 




Mrs. Stanley Yanagi, wife of the financial secretary and busi- 
ness representative of Local 745. cuts the Hawaiian "'ribbon," 
officially opening the building. Many visitors wore flower ieis 
during the special opening ceremonies. 



A plaque to Stanley "Maui" Yanagi, financial manager of the 
local union, is examined by General President Sidell, Stanley 
Yanagi. Cong. Spark Matsunaga, Mrs. Yanagi, and General 
Treasurer Nichols. 



President Sidell. attended by GEB Member Bryant and Gen- 
eral Treasurer Nichols, presented a color photograph of the 
General Executive Board to Local President Masayuki Yam- 
amoto and Financial Secretary Yanagi. 



The spacious board room of the new Local 745 headquarters 
is admired by General officers, their wives, and visitors. Pacific 
art motifs are displayed on the wall of this room and in other 
areas of the building. 




fASHW 





ROUNDUP 



NATURAL GAS PRICE HIKE-Consumers can look forward to substantial boosts in their 
gas "bills as a result of a recent Federal Power Commission decision permitting 
three large producers to raise the price of new natural gas at the wellhead 73 
percent above current levels. 

FOOD COSTS CONTINUE UP— 'ATiolesale prices, led by sharp increases in food and farm 
products, rose at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 24 percent in May — the 
largest monthly increase in years except for a 27.6 percent jump in March. 

AFL-CIO President George Meany said the sharp and widespread increase in the 
wholesale price index v/as "additional bad news" for American consumers because it 
will soon be translated into higher prices at retail stores. 

GOING BACK TO THE PAST— The principle of the rotary engine, now being used in some 
automobiles, was patented in 1769 by James Watt, the inventor of the steam engine, 
according to the National Geographic Society. 

SIMPLE SOLUTION— Morale is so low at the Cost of Living Council that outside 
consultants are being brought in to see what can be done about it. 

McKinsey & Co. is undertaking a 556,000 study to improve spirits at the 
agency. Others suggest that effective machinery to control soaring living costs 
might lift morale better than any study. 

CRASH PROGRAM— The Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health 
Administration noted with pride that it set a new high for job safety and health 
inspections in March — 5,316. 

At this rate it will take only 62 years to get around to all of the 4.1 
million establishments covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Act. 

BUILDING TRADES WAGES— They 're going to have a difficult time blaming building 
trades wage increases for the steep rise in the cost of construction. 

The Labor Department's Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that union wage 
rates for building trades workers in cities of 100,000 or more increased only 0.2 
percent in the first quarter and 5.8 percent over the year that ended April 2, 
1973. 

The quarterly increase was the smallest since 0.2 percent was reported for 
the third quarter of 1964. The annual rise was the smallest since the 5.5 percent 
increase recorded in July, 1968. 

MORE FISH DINNERS — Americans are eating more fish, preliminary data gathered by the 
National Marine Fisheries Service reveals. In 1972, the per capita consumption of 
fishery products was 12.2 pounds per person, reports KMFS. The figure ties the 
record U.S. figure set forty-five years ago, in 1927. It shows that the American 
housewife was buying more fish for her family months before meat prices became 
headline news early in 1973. 

GIFT GIVER— l^/hen Consumer Federation of America honored Sen. Warren Magnuson at 
an awards dinner, he was introduced by Machinist Editor Gordon Cole. 

Cole described the Senator's role in amending the Postal Reorganization Act 
to slip in language that said that any unsolicited merchandise received in the 
mails could be considered a gift by the recipient. 

"So anytime you get anything free in the mail," said Cole, "consider it a 
gift ... a gift from Warren Magnuson." 

SENATE LUMBER STUDY-Sen. John Sparkman (D-Ala.) recently announced that the Joint 
Committee on Defense Production, of which he is chairman, is undertaking a prelim- 
inary investigation to determine the causes of the lumber shortage and the reasons 
for the high prices existing in this market today. He described the lumber short- 
age as reaching "crisis proportions." 



THE CARPENTER 




FOURTH DISTRICTS 
NTA, GA.— JULY 29-AUGUST I 



REmONAL SEMINARS 
BEGIN THIS MONTH 



meeting the challenges of the 70's 



■ A series of six regional Broth- 
erhood conferences begins July 8 in 
Boston, Mass., and extends through 
July, August and into September, 
concluding with a seminar in Spo- 
kane, Wash., September 23-26. (The 
map above indicates where and 
when the conferences will be held.) 

Designed to "meet the challenges 
of the 70's," the conferences were 
formulated early this year by Gen- 
eral President William Sidell as a 
means of offering full-time Brother- 
hood leaders an in-depth review of 
the problems facing our organization 
and a forum for re-evaluating 
policies and objectives. 



In a letter which went out re- 
cently to all local unions and dis- 
trict, state and provincial councils, 
General President Sidell said, "The 
decade of the 70's appears from all 
indications to be shaping up as a 
most challenging period for our 
United Brotherhood. Never before 
have we been assaulted on as many 
fronts as we have in recent years. 
The 1960"s were filled with turmoil, 
conflict, social-economic changes 
never before known by North Amer- 
icans. These changes have had an 
effect on our organizational struc- 
ture, on our being, and perhaps on 
the survival of the trade union move- 



ment as we know it today ..." 

The four-day seminars will bring 
together fulltime business represen- 
tatives, financial secretaries, council 
representatives, officers, and orga- 
nizers serving the membership on a 
fulltime basis throughout North 
America. 

The General President indicated 
his concern with meeting the many 
issues facing the Brotherhood, this 
j'ear. 

"Time will not make it possible 
nor can we permit any delay in 
meeting these issues until the Gen- 
eral Convention scheduled for next 
fall," he said. ■ 



JULY, 1973 




Minnesotaiis crowded the main floor of the Minneapolis Contention Hall to see the exhibits. 

Craft and Industrial Skills Featured at 
1973 AFL-CIO Union Industries Show 




General OfBcers .Skiniur, I i>ini;sfon, and Sidell, and GEB A scale model of a bouse, with displays of siding, roofing, and 
Member Greene examine one of several company displays at other elements was created by students of the St. Paul A'oca- 
the Brotherhood exhibit. tional School. 




Don Jacknian. business representative of Local 1644, discusses Bill May, left, Minnesota's 1971 carpenter apprentice champion, 
work done on a miniature concrete form with First General watches Dick Miller, fourth jear apprentice of Local 87. St. 
Vice President Skinner. Paul, make a footstool. 



8 



THE CARPENTER 




Two international presidents "switch crafts": General President Sidell decorates a 
cake, above left. Bakery and Confectionery Workers President Dan Conway tries his 
band at making a wooden stool, above right. 




Ribbon-cutting ceremonies at the opening of the show found General President Sidell 
at one end of the shiny band and Show Director Edward Murphy at the other. Cutting 
the ribbon were, from left. Operating Engineers President Hunter P. Wharton, Union 
Label and Service Trades Dept. President Richard F. Walsh, and United Garment 
Workers President Joseph P. McCurdy. 




Some of the men responsible for makijig the 1973 exhibition a success: local and 
district council leaders of the Twin Cities and instructors in the local training pro- 
gram, with the General Officers and GEB Member Greene. Among those handlijig 
the day-to-day work at the show were the men seated in the church pew — D.C. 
Secretary -Treasurer Lawrence T. Knutson and Local 1644 Business Representative 
Don Jackman — Carl Linde, business representative of Local 889. Hopkins, Minn., 
third from left, standing, Wallace Ostlund. business representative of Local 851, 
Anoka, and several other area business representatives. 



■ The 28th AFL-CIO Union In- 
dustries Show was held in Minne- 
apolis, Minn., last month, and the 
Brotherhood was a major exhibitor. 

In 1200 square feet of display 
space we described for a quarter of 
a million Minnesota visitors the 
many advantages of buying union 
made products and services — par- 
ticularly those bearing the Brother- 
hood's union label. 

Several union manufacturers joined us 
in the exhibition, and the advantages of 
apprenticeship training were clearly 
demonstrated. 

A highlight of the Brotherhood ex- 
hibit was the on-the-spot craft work of 
fourth-year apprentice Dick Miller of 
Local 87. St. Paul, who turned out 48 
footstools during the six-day show, as 
spectators surrounded his booth. One of 
the stools was given away free every 
hour in an exciting, crowded drawing 
of tickets. 

The manipulative project of the 1973 
Minnesota Carpenters Apprenticeship 
Contest — a combination sandbox, slide, 
and general playground fixture — was on 
display. 

Scale models of construction projects, 
created by apprentices at the St. Paul 
Vocational High School, were shown. 
Trusses for the big overhanging signs 
of the exhibit were created by trainees 
at Vocational Technical School, Osseo, 
Minn. 

The Brotherhood's growing industrial 
membership in the Twin-Cities area was 
clearly shown by the variety of industrial 
displays. Church equipment created by 
members employed by Northland Wood 
Products, Luck. Wis., drew much atten- 
tion, A custom-made store checkout 
counter was displayed by Sure-Nuff Fix- 
ture Co. Among other exhibitors were 
Havenstein-Burmeister (elevator cabs 
and elevator entrance frames). J. R. 
Jones (custom displays for stores), De- 
Vac Window Products (self-storing win- 
dow units), the Minnesota Drywall Assn. 
(drywall installations). Suburban Wood 
Products (custom, prefinished cabinets), 
and Meidlingers. Inc. (cabinets and fix- 
tures). 

Two dozen large photographs mount- 
ed throughout the exhibit showed union 
form work, home construction, and 
millwork. 

Among the guests at opening day cere- 
monies were General President William 
Sidell. General Treasurer R. E. Living- 
ston (who was also in Minneapolis for 
a meeting of the AFL-CIO Secretary- 
Treasurer's Conference), and First Gen- 
eral Vice President Herbert Skinner. 
Fifth District Board Member Leon W. 
Greene worked with leaders of the Twin 
Cities District Council to make the ex- 
hibition a success. ■ 



JULY, 1973 



Building Trades, Employers Ink 
Jurisdictional Disputes Plan 



■ Agreement has been reached 
between the building trades unions 
and the organized construction in- 
dustry on a new plan for setding 
jurisdictional disputes. 

The plan, the result of one and 
a half years of intensive negotia- 
tions, is designed to establish pro- 
cedures and tribunals which will 
reduce jurisdictional work stop- 
pages. 

Among the organizations signing 
the agreement is the Associated 
General Contractors of America, 
Inc., which had withdrawn from a 
similar plan a few years ago. 

Other employer groups signing 
are the National Constructors Asso- 
ciation, the National Council of 
Erectors, Fabricators and Riggers; 
the National Association of Miscel- 
laneous Ornamental and Architec- 
tural Products Contractors; Sheet 
Metal and Air Conditioning Con- 
tractors National Association; Me- 



chanical Contractors Association of 
America, Inc.; National Erectors 
Association, National Electrical 
Contractors Association, Inc.; Na- 
tional Insulation Contractors Asso- 
ciation and International Associa- 
tion of Wall and Ceiling Contrac- 
tors. 

President Frank Bonadio and 
Secretary-Treasurer Robert A. 
Georgine signed for the AFL-CIO 
Building and Construction Trades 
Department, representing 17 build- 
ing trades unions with more than 
three million members. 

"It is our considered view," said 
Bonadio, "that jurisdictional dis- 
putes between the trades can be 
settled in a satisfactory manner by 
the procedures of the new plan, 
without work stoppages." 

"The consequent decrease in con- 
struction costs should aid the fair 
employer in becoming more com- 
petitive." 

One of the major changes in the 



new plan is that the old Joint Board 
is replaced by an "Impartial Juris- 
dictional Disputes Board composed 
of three impartial members who are 
knowledgeable and experienced in 
the construction industry." There 
also is an alternate member. 

William J. Cour, chairman of 
the former board, will be the chair- 
man of the new plan. Serving with 
him will be Oscar Smith of Lusby, 
Maryland, former director of Labor 
Relations for the Atomic Energy 
Commission and former Director of 
Personnel at the University of Illi- 
nois; and Eugene DiSabatino, a 
Wilmington, Delaware contractor. 
The alternate member is Gordon 
Jones, of Crittenden, Virginia, for- 
mer president of the National Con- 
structors Association and also the 
M. W. Kellogg Co. 

There will also be an Appeals 
Board. Criteria for selection of the 
members of this board are the same 
as the criteria for the selection of 
the Impartial Board. The Appeals 
Board is to be composed of an 
Impartial Umpire and two mem- 
bers, plus an alternate. (PAI) ■ 



Unions, Westinghouse Agree; 
General Electric Pact Oked 



■ Coordinated bargaining for 13 
unions, including the Brotherhood 
and representing some 200,000 em- 
ployees at General Electric and 
Westinghouse, has paid off this year. 

Agreement has been reached with 
Westinghouse by the International 
Union of Electrical Workers on a 
new three-year agreement, establish- 
ing a pattern for all 68,000 West- 
inghouse employees. Locals are 
being urged to ratify the pact. 

At about the same time the Gen- 
eral Electric Conference Board of 
lUE announced that the tentative 
agreement covering 85,000 of GE's 
140,000 employees has won local 
union ratification. 

The two agreements are substan- 
tially the same, providing workers 
with 88 cents an hour increase over 
a 37-month term. 

The Westinghouse pact was ham- 
mered out between lUE and the 
company on an around-the-clock 



basis under the auspices of the Fed- 
eral Mediation and Conciliation 
Service. Federal Mediator W. J. 
Usery entered the talks on the final 
day. 

The Westinghouse conference 
boards of both lUE and the United 
Electrical Workers voted to urge 
ratification by their local unions. 
Officers of IBEW EM-1, Steelwork- 
ers. Allied Industrial Workers, Flint 
Glass Workers, the United Brother- 
hood, and Machinists are also rec- 
ommending ratification by locals. 

Breakthroughs considered partic- 
ularly significant in the Westing- 
house agreement provide for: 

• Pension changes permitting 
workers with 30 or more years oj 
service to retire at 58 or 59 with 
reduction of one-half of one percent 
for each month they are under 60. 
Workers can vest after ten years. 
There is no age floor. 

• Vacations — after two years but 



less than si.x, two weeks; after six 
years, two weeks and one day, add- 
ing one day per year reaching three 
weeks after ten years. Also, four 
weeks after 15 years and five weeks 
after 25. 

• Workers hit by plants closing 
who have ten or more years can 
retire at 58 or 59 with reduction of 
one-half of one percent for each 
month they are under 60. 

The wage section of the Westing- 
house agreement gives workers 25 
cents an hour retroactive to June 
1 1 . This is calculated as 1 5 cents 
in wages and 10 cents in cost-of- 
living. Other wage increases will be 
16 cents on June 10, 1974 and 
June 3, 1975. 

For salaried workers the June 1 1 
increase will range from $4.80 to 
S9.80 a week or $20.80 to $42.46 
a month. For the next two years 
the range will be $5-$ 10 weekly and 
$21.66-^$43.32 monthly. 

Cost-of-living increases will be 
guaranteed five cents this December 
10; 14 cents with 10 guaranteed De- 
Continued on page 38 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



Labor Movement Becoming Victim 
Of it's Own Success, Terzick Warns 




EUGENE DEBS AWARD 
TO PETER TERZICK 

The Midwest Labor Press Associa- 
tion at its recent meeting in Lexing- 
ton. Kentucky, presented its annual 
Eugene Debs Award to former Car- 
penter Editor and former General 
Treasurer Peter Terzick. 

The award commended Terzick for 
"his progressive service to organized 
labor as a leader, and his forthright 
advocacy as a labor editor of the prin- 
ciples and spirit e-xeniplified by Eu- 
gene V. Debs." 

The award was presented to the 
Carpenter's recently retired editor at 
a banquet following a day-long edi- 
tors' seminar on the campus of the 
University of Kentucky. 



n An increasing number of un- 
ion members are turning aside from 
their responsibilities to social pro- 
grams, former Carpenter editor, 
Peter Terzick warned in a speech 
last month before the Midwest 
Labor Press Association in Lexing- 
ton, Kentucky. 

"It's the old attitude: 'I'm in the 
boat: pull up the ladder,' " he com- 
mented. 

"The labor movement is becom- 
ing a victim of its own success. 
Basically, we have progressed so 
fast and so far in improving wages 
and working conditions for our 
members that we have lost many 
of our traditional allies." 

Terzick pointed out that, over 
the years, many college professors, 
social workers, and other elements 
which traditionally make up the 
libera! base in our society, auto- 
matically aligned themselves with 
labor in its struggles. He warned 
that many people in these categories 
now feel that their help is no longer 
necessary. 

"We are increasingly standing 
alone in fighting for the programs 
which organized labor espouses," 
he added. 



"Fortunately, however, this as- 
pect has a happier side," he con- 
tinued. "More and more people in 
academia and in social services are 
concluding that their best interests 
lie in joining unions of their own." 

Terzick reminded the labor edi- 
tors that union members by the 
thousands are moving into subur- 
bia. 

"They are fighting backbreaking 
mortgages, skyrocketing taxes, the 
need for two automobiles, and all 
the other problems that make sub- 
urban living a headache for so 
many. 

"I wonder if the labor press has 
adequately recognized this shift in 
union membership thinking. Lib- 
eralism is losing out too rapidly 
among skilled union members." 

Terzick found confirmation of 
this fact in the labor vote during 
the last two or three general elec- 
tions. 

"The labor vote was no better 
than 50-50." he said. 

He urged the labor press of 
North America to be "particularly 
sensitive to the thinking of our rank 
and tile." ■ 



Controversial West Front of Capitol 
Still Awaits Action by Congress 



■ The West Front of the Capitol in 
Washington. D.C., shown on our front 
cover, has been the subject of con- 
troversy among architects, historians, 
and preservationists since the mid- 
1960"s. when the Architect of the 
Capitol reported to Congress that the 
west front was beginning to show signs 
of age. 

Now cracked in several places, the 
central west colonnade has been sup- 
ported since 1 965 by wooden buttress 
shoring. 

Shortly after the Architect's diag- 
nosis of trouble, two schools of 
thought developed. It was suggested 
by one group that the west front of 
the building be extended in the trouble 
area, thereby shoring up at the present 
wall and strengthening the entire base 
with the additional superstructure. It 



was proposed that the west front be 
extended 44 feet at the central portion, 
88 feet at the House and Senate wings, 
and 56 feet at the corridors linking the 
House and Senate wings. The exten- 
sions would provide badly-needed 
office space in the building. 

A seven-member Commission for 
Extension of the United States Capitol 
was established in the late 60's — com- 
posed of Congressional leaders and 
the Capitol Architect — and this group 
has regularly recommended that the 
front be extended. Its most recent 
meeting, February 28, reiterated this. 

There is, however, a second faction 
concerned with the west front — a 
group made up of historians, archi- 
tects, and preservationists who don't 
want to change the west face at all. 
except for shoring up what is already 



there. Three years ago, Congress paid 
for an independent study by the archi- 
tectural-engineering firm of Praeger, 
Kavanagh. Waterbury (PWK) of New 
York City, which said that the walls 
were in no danger of collapse, as 
some had suggested, and it recom- 
mended restoration, which it said 
could be accomplished for less than 
$15 million. (Capitol Architect George 
M. White disagreed at the time, con- 
tending that restoration would cost 
twice that amount.) 

White, who withheld his opinion 
until about a year ago, favors the 
Commission's extension plan, which 
he estimates would cost $58 million. 
He doesn't think the walls are in 
danger of collapse, but he points out 
that repair is in order. 

There is now a bill before Congress 
to begin extension in 1974. The House 
has voted in favor of the bill, but the 
Senate still has to act. The Legisla- 
tive Subcommittee of the Senate Ap- 
propriations Committee has the bill 
under study. B 



JULY, 1973 



11 




CANADIAN 



High Rise! 











person selling the house, one repre- 
senting the mortgage company and 
the third representing the buyer. 

Basford said that very often the 
legal work is done by a legal secretary 
who sets up the whole deal. 

A few years ago, a task force on 
housing urged that legal fees be re- 
duced. Obviously nothing has been 
done, and the consumer continues 
to pay the shot. 

Housing Costs 
In the North High 

People living in Canada's north do 
so because they like the life and not 
because living costs are low. To live 
in Northern Ontario, for example, has 
its advantages, but it costs more to 
maintain modem living standards. 

Floyd Laughren, a member of the 
Ontario Legislature from Nickel Belt, 
produced figures to show that it costs 
S5,510 more to build a house in Sud- 
bury than in Hamilton, the steel town. 
In fact construction costs are higher 
in .Sudbury than in any other major 
urban area of Canada. 

The NDP M.P.P. called for an in- 
vestigation into housing costs in the 
north, especially since wages paid are 
lower than in the south. So are land 
costs. 



Jobless Benefits 
■au^cp^ Higher Than Year Ago 



Urban Affairs Minister Calls 
Legal Fees on Real Estate High 



A lawyer who is in a good position 
to know what he is talking about says 
that lawyers are charging too much on 
real estate deals, which is a factor in 
pushing up housing costs. 

The man who spoke up is none 
other than Ron Basford, minister of 
urban affairs in the federal govern- 
ment. Before getting into parliament, 
he was a lawyer in Vancouver. 

He stated that fees charged by the 
legal profession in the land business 
are "exorbitantly high." 

He suggested that the law associa- 
tions which set rates for legal work 
should take a look at their tariff. 

The federal housing minister re- 
ferred to comments by the mayor of 
Calgary Rod Sykes who claimed that 
lawyers' charges for real estate deals 
are like a "robbers" cave". 



The Calgary mayor charged that 
the federal housing agency. Central 
Mortgage and Housing, hires Liberal 
lawyers to do unnecessary legal work 
on mortgages "as a patronage pay- 
off". 

He said a person buying a house 
at $20,000 pays a lawyer $300 in fees 
but the lawyer ""has never done any- 
thing for him . . . (but) the lawyer is 
on the party list". Sometimes the legal 
fee is $500 or more. 

The same complaints have been 
heard in Ontario, so the situation 
could be much the same in other 
provinces. In the Metro Toronto area, 
the recognized legal fee in the pur- 
chase of a $39,000 home (the average 
selling price) is about $1,200. 

Three lawyers are involved in a 
housing deal — one representing the 



In the first quarter of the year, un- 
employment insurance benefits paid 
across Canada were $150 million 
higher than a year ago. A total of 
S680 million was paid out this year 
compared with $530 million in 1972, 
despite lower unemployment rates. 

The increase is accounted for by 
the higher benefit rates and for the 
new maternity and sickness benefits. 

Benefit payments this year range 
from $32 to $107 a week. Last year 
they ranged from $20 to $100. 

Dare Boycott Gets 
Continued Support 

The trade union movement is back- 
ing the boycott of products, chiefly 
biscuits, made by Dare Foods Ltd. 

Up to 5.000 citizens walked in sup- 
port of the strike at the company's 
Kitchener. Ontario, plant, which en- 
tered its second year June 1st. 

The company has been fined SI .500 
for violating the Ontario Labor Re- 
lations Act. It ran advertisements 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



which, according to the court, inter- 
fered with employees' rights to main- 
tain union membership. 

But it has cost the brewery work- 
ers union over a quarter of a million 
dollars to fight the company, now 
employing strikebreakers. The boy- 
cott is essential and has been partially 
successful already in keeping the Dare 
name off supermarket shelves. 

Federal Review Board 
To Study Food Prices 

The federal government has set up 
a food prices review board as recom- 
mended by the special House of Com- 
mons committee investigating food 
prices. 

One of the five members of the 
board is a trade unionist, L. H. Lor- 
rain, a general vice-president of the 
Canadian Labor Congress and Cana- 
dian Director of the United Paper 
Workers. 

Chairman is Mrs. Beryl Plumptre, 
who is past president of the Con- 
sumers Association of Canada and is 
currently president of the Vanier In- 
stitute of the Family. 

The new board has two assignments, 
one, to monitor the movement of food 
prices and issue quarterly reports on 
them; two, to inquire into specific 
food price increases and make recom- 
mendations to the government. 



Some critics, including trade union- 
ists, believe the board will be less than 
useful unless it has the power to take 
action, such as ordering a price roll- 
back if necessary. 

On the same day that the federal 
review board was named, the Ontario 
Federation of Labor made public a 
50-page study on food prices which 
proposed an "independent" prices re- 
view board, beefed up legislation to 
increase competition in the food in- 
dustry and a form of grievance pro- 
cedure for consumers who feel they 
are being victimized by the super- 
markets. 

The OFL study blamed profiteering 
and monopoly control as major factors 
in raising food prices. 

Neither farmer nor worker is getting 
undue rewards from higher prices, 
but price fixing, advertising, packag- 
ing and high profits are the chief 
culprits in pushing prices up by 13% 
in the last year. 

The study does not support a freeze 
on prices which, it says, would simply 
consolidate prices at their highest point 
and allow them to fioat even higher 
when the restrictions are lifted. 

It does call for legislation to control 
deception in packaging, advertising, 
sales promotion and in other areas. 

What the OFL study doesn't ask is 
why, on this continent, people crowd 
into supermarkets which are supposed 
to be gouging them, but do little or 



CLC Operates from New Ottawa Headquarters 




NEW HEADQUARTERS of the Canadian Labor Congress, a modernistic five-story 
building was dedicated in Ottawa "to the working people of Canada." In the fore- 
ground are CLC Secretary-Treasurer VVilliani Dodge. President Donald McDonald, 
Canadian Minister of Labor .lohn Munro and Henry Segal, treasurer of the Paper- 
workers. Several affiliated unions will also have headquarters here. 



northing about possible alternatives 
like cooperatives which have achieved 
considerable success in Europe. These 
big cooperatives, operating in Britain, 
Sweden, Denmark and other countries, 
provide the competition which the 
OFL is urging. In fact the co-ops in 
Europe are the main factors in the 
food industry from the farm to the 
table. 

Lacking a practicable alternative 
on this continent, consumers will have 
to continue to demand from govern- 
ments more restrictions, controls, 
guidelines and review boards to keep 
their living costs within bounds. 

How hard this is to do in our mod- 
ern consumer economy, managed by 
huge monopolies, oligopolies, multi- 
national corporations and private fi- 
nancial institutions, is shown every day 
in rising prices for almost everything. 

Dodge Foresees Rise 
In Label Membership 

William Dodge, secretary-treasurer 
of the CLC, predicts that in the fore- 
seeable future, at least half the labor 
force will be in unions, instead of the 
present one-third. 

Some of the membership additions 
will come from the low-paid service 
industries, others from the ranks of 
white collar workers who are being 
actively canvassed by a newly-set up 
organization called the Association of 
Commercial and Technical Employ- 
ees. ACTE is a CLC affiliate estab- 
lished to meet the resolution on white 
collar organization adopted at the last 
CLC convention. 

Andras to Update 
UIC Operations 

The procedures of the Unemploy- 
ment Insurance Commission are going 
to get an overhaul. Robert Andras, 
Minister of Manpower and Immigra- 
tion, intends to spend $14 million to 
open new UIC centers and improve 
existing centers to "humanize" the un- 
employment insurance operations. 
Leaving too much to computers has 
its faults, as experience has shown. 

The changes were in large part the 
result of trade union protests against 
the inconsiderate treatment of unem- 
ployment insurance claimants by UIC 
investigators, probing the legitimacy 
of their claims. 

The re-organized UIC centres will 
allow claimants to deal with only one 
skilled official instead of being shunted 
from one office to another, often with 
negative results. 



JULY, 1973 



13 




LOCAL UNION NEWS 



Twentypeniiy Nail 
Opens Jail Locks 

Here's a case of what not to do with 
a nail: A prisoner working as a trusty 
at a National Guard Armory made a key 
to fit all locks inside the armory from a 
twentypenny nail, according to the maga- 
zine. Law Officer. 

After his discharge, the prisoner re- 
turned to the armory, used the homemade 
key to open six interior locks and stole 
32 .45-calibre automatic weapons. 

He was apprehended several days later 
as he attempted to dispose of the guns, 
according to Salvy J. Prisco of Local 
1321, Ballston Spa, N.Y., who sent the 
item to us. 




Key made from a 20-peimy nail by 
prisoner opens padlock, above. 

• 
Your presence is needed at local union 
meetings. Don't sit at home idle on meet- 
ing nights, when your local has business 
affecting your job and your future. Be an 
active member of the Brotherhood. 



Aid to Handicapped 






General Representative Raymond Gin- 
netti picks a winner in a raffle held by 
Local 1050, Philadelphia, Pa., to raise 
Funds for handicapped children. Holding 
tlie box of entrees is Recording Secretary 
John Anello. 



Claude Nixon, right, president of Local 
2024, Miami, Fla., confers with Israeli 
Minister of Labor Yosef Almogi. 

Florida Brotherhood 
Leaders Visit Israel 

A group of 12 trade unionists returned 
to Florida recently after a series of meet- 
ings in Israel with top government and 
union officials. The visit was arranged 
under the auspices of the Israel Bond 
Organization to familiarize the labor 
leaders with the economic needs of the 
country. Diuing their stay, they visited 
development sites and also toured through 
the Sinai Desert to inspect some of the 
fortifications along the Suez Canal. 

The delegation was led by Herbert 
Schifiman of Miami Beach, president of 
Hotel and Restaurant Employees Local 
255. In the group were Claude B. Nixon, 
president of Carpenters Local 2024 and 
Mrs. Nixon and .(. L. "Dusty" Rhodes, 
former Southern Director. American 
Federation of Labor and retired former 
Director of Organization United Brother- 
hood. 

Labor-Employer 
Support of Guard 

Labor and management must both 
adopt and support a policy which will 
"promote and enhance the individual's 
opportunit\ for membership in the Na- 
tional Guard and Military Reserves." 
AFL-CIO President George Meany and 
U.S. Industrialist J. M. Roche said in a 
recent joint statement. 

"If the transition to an all-volunteer. 
active-dut\' military establishment is to be 
successfully achieved and maintained, la- 
bor and management must make it possi- 
ble for the volunteer Reservist and Na- 
tional Guardsmen to devote adequate 
time to training. 



Social Seciu'ity Talk 
For Union Meetings 

Would your members be interested in 
hearing answers to their questions on 
Social Security and Retirement? 

The International Labor Press Associ- 
ation. AFL-CIO. has arranged with an 
official of the Social Security Adminis- 
tration to supply speakers for meetings, 
workshops, and seminars on various as- 
pects of Social Security and Medicare. 

To arrange for such program assist- 
ance, write to Russell R. Jalbert, Assist- 
ant Commissioner of Public Affairs. 
The Social Security Administration, Bal- 
timore. Md. 21235. He may refer your 
request to a regional office, but he as- 
sures us that the Social Security Admin- 
istration will make a sincere effort to 
accommodate you. 



Federal Worker 
Decal Available 




Federal employees who are members 
of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of .Vmcrica and whose local 
unions participate in AFL-CIO Metal 
Trades Councils can now wear a special 
insignia on their hard hats or wearing 
apparel. 

Howard Hughes, president of Civil 
Service Employees Local 2456. Washing- 
ton, D.C., above, applies such an insignia 
on his hard hat as he prepares for a 
day's work. 

The special red, white, and blue 
patches are being distributed by the office 
of the Brotherhood's director of organiz- 
ing at General Headquarters. Members 
entitled to wear the decal are encouraged 
to do so. 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



Women Members 
Build Mobile Homes 

National Homes Corp. operates a 
large mobile-home manufacturing plant 
near Tyler, Tex., where members of Lo- 
cal 2863-S are employed. Women are a 
large part of the Brotherhood member- 
ship in the plant. Here are three of them 
at work: 









. 


i 


1 


r 


1 


'i 


1 


1 



t 






t 






^ 


: i ' 




; '■■ 



Louise McManus. department steward, 
installs curtains in hallway windows of a 
mobile home. 




Nellie Wesley, chief steward, operates 
a mechanical stapler, applying molding 
on a wall. 




Sandra Brjant screws a curtain rod 
above an end window in a mobile home 
under construction. 




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Not only of your own work but that 
of all related trades as well. 

Send for the free blueprints we are 
offering of a modern six room ranch. 
These prints cover not only floor plan, 
elevations, and foimdation, but also 
construction details such as wall sec- 
tion, roof cornice, electrical wiring, 
window head, etc. 

Included will be Chicago Tech's well 
known special lesson on Plan Reading. 
28 pages of practical introduction to 
construction plan reading based on 
actual problems. Any building crafts- 
man will recognize the great value of 
this instruction to his present and 
future work. 

Investigate Chicago Tech 
Builders Training 

Why this unusual offer of the free 
blueprints and lesson in Plan Reading? 
Siinply this — to introduce you to the 
Chicago Tech home study program in 
Building Construction. A system of 
practical and advanced instruction 
covering Blueprint Reading — Estimat- 



ing — and all phases of building con- 
struction from residential to large 
commercial structures of steel and 
concrete. 

You owe it to yourself to find out 
what it takes to step up to a foreman 
and superintendent job — what you 
must know to run a building job in- 
stead of doing just the physical work 
year after year! Further, the only way 
you can increase your income substan- 
tially is by starting your own contract- 
ing business; or in supervisory work 
where year 'round salaries are far bet- 
ter than hourly wages often subject to 
layoffs of one kind or another. 

Take Advantage of This Free Offer! 

So, mail the coupon below for the free 
ranch blueprints and accompanying 
lesson in Plan Reading. Included, also, 
will be Chicago Tech's catalog on 
home-study training in Building Con- 
struction. Learn how for only about 
three dollars per week you can put 
your spare time to work preparing for 
that better job, promotion, or a con- 
tracting business of your own! 



ESTABUSHED 1904 • APPROVED FOR VETERANS 

CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE 

TECH BLDG., 2000 MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO, ILL. 60616 



FREE 

BLUE PRINTS 

AND 
TRIAL LESSON 

Send for your free trial 
lesson now. See how sim- 
ple it is to learn blue print 
reading the CTC way. All 
information sent by mail. 
No salesman will call. 

MAIL COUPON TODAY 



D 



Chicago Technicat College New G.I. Bill! 

H-145 Tech BIdg., 2000 S. Michigan Vets check here 

Chicago, Illinois 60616 

Please mail me Free Trial Lesson, Blue prints and Catalog. 
I understand there is no obligation — no salesman will call. 



Name. 



-Age. 



Address _ 



City. 



. State . 



.Zip. 



Occupation . 



JULY, 1973 



15 



NO^Rl^K TRIAL 

IN YOUR 

OWN HOME 



DOZENS OF PHOTOS plus "SHOW-HOW" 
ILLUSTRATIONS MAKE CONSTRUCTION 
OF 70 CABINET TYPES EASY FOR YOU. 





KITCHEN CABINETS 

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by Robert P. Stevenson 
fHome and Shop editor. Popular Science) 

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ii \ step-by-step directions- Thoroughly revised with 



DOZENS OF NEW PHOTOS 



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FULL WORKING PLANS 

EASYTO FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS for 

70 TYPES OF CABINETS 



Complete plans for YOUR custom kitchen. 
Select the step-saving, labor-saving kitchen 
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Partial List of Tested and Proven Designs 
Wall Oven and Cooking Top Cabinets. Over- 
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DOZENS OF PHOTOS 
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I 



Arco Publishing Company. Inc. 

Dept. CP73 

219 Park Ave. South, New York. N.Y. 10003 

Send me "How to Build Cabinets for the Modern 
Kitchen" with the understanding that if I am not 
completely satisfied I can return it in ten days for 
FULL REFUND. 

Enclosed is $7.50 ppd. Q Check □ Money Order 



Name 



Crty/St. 



St. Louis Retirees With Retroactive Benefits 




^ eteran ineinbers of the Carpenters" District Council of Greater St. Louis. AFL-CIO, 
receive their first peusion checks from Ollie Laiighorst. executive secetarj -treasurer, 
at left. The checks included not only the first monthly pension benefit, but a total 
of over S3.000 in retroactive benefits due from the day they retired until they received 
their first check. Receiving checks from Langhorst are, from left to right, Louis Nic- 
cum. Local 5; James Patterson, Local 417; James Henderson, Local 5; Orla Carl, 
Local 1739 and George Herminghaus, Local 5. 

Sou of Heart Victim Retiree Houorecl 




Emilo Capibianco, Jr.. left, was recent- 
ly presented a check for S2.103.69 by 
Local 1050, Philadelphia, Pa., to enable 
him to get an advanced education. The 
check, presented by Business Representa- 
tive John Anello, recording secretary, 
right, as Emilo's mother looked on, was 
given in memory of the young man's 
father, a member of Local 1050 who was 
the first area Carpenter to have a heart 
transplant but who succumbed to the 
operation eight hours after its completion. 

AFL-CIO Studies Center 

Continued from page 3 
Room, board and travel expenses are 
usually paid by the sponsoring union 
or the individual, depending on the 
arrangement that the individual makes 
with his union. 

In 1971 the AFL-CIO convention 
urged all affiliates to make "full and 
continuing use"' of the Labor Studies 
Center and a scholarship fund was 
established to assist unions with limited 
resources to send representatives to 
the center's courses. 

Each course is designed to serve the 
individual and the labor movement 
as an institution. While presented on 
a fairly sophisticated level, the courses 
are not totally academic. Field experi- 
ences of the participants are incorpo- 



At a special called meeting of Local 
1963. Toronto, Ont. members showed 
their appreciation to their retiring presi- 
dent, John Mitchell, by honoring him 
with a gift. Making the presentation was 
Sam Powell, left, vice-president of the 
local. 



TOOL TALK 



by Jones 




rated into the courses, affording the 
students an opportunity to exchange 
ideas, tactics and techniques. 

The teaching staff is skilled in edu- 
cation and knowledgable about the 
labor movement. 

All elements considered, the new 
AFL-CIO Labor Studies Center will 
be. as AFL-CIO President George 
Meany expresses it. "worthy of the 
American labor movement"' and an 
institution to which we can point with 
pride. ■ 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



When you want to know about trigger 
speed control driHs, ask the people who 

invented them. Skil. 



Solid-state Trigger Speed 
Control operates from zero 
RPM to top speed (750 RPM 
on Skil drill shown). Soyou can 
start holes in metal without 
acenterpunch.0Allballand 
needle bearing construction 
for precision operation, long 
life. ^ Fingertip reversing 
switch means you can remove 
screws as well as drive them. 
A3 amp burnout- protected 





motor designed to resist overloads. 

Substitool keeps you on the job if 
we keep your drill in our shop for repair. 

Register with Skil as a professional trades- 
man at the time you purchase an In- 
dustrial Skil drill that's covered by our 
Substitool program. And if we ever have 
to keep it in our shop for service, we'll lend 
you a Substitool free. Ask your Skil sup- 
plier about the many other Skil tools that 
are included in the Substitool program. 

Nobody was ever sorry he bought the best there is. 



® 




GO^IP 



SEND YOUR FAVORITES TO: 

PLANE GOSSIP, 101 CONSTITUTION 

AVE. NW, WASH., D.C. 20001. 

SORRY, BUT NO PAYMENT MADE 

AND POETRY NOT ACCEPTED. 



Working In Harness 

A farmer, plowing with one mule, 
kept calling out, "Giddap, Bruno! 
Giddap, Laddy! Giddap, Oscar! 
Giddap, Joe!" 

A stranger asked, "What's his 
name?" 

"Name's Pete," replied the farmer. 

"What's the idea, then, of all the 
other names." 

"Oh," said the farmer, "he don't 
know his own strength; so I put 
blinders on him and yell a lot of 
names, and he thinks a lot of other 
mules are helping "im." 

MAKE YOUR SSS CLICK— GIVE TO CLIC 

On Labor's Side 

A labor leader was detailing to one 
of his associates the troubles he was 
having with his wife. When the whole 
account had been given, the associ- 
ate said, "It may surprise you, but 
I'd have to agree with your wife." 

"Oh, a fink!" exclaimed the labor 
leader. "I never thought you'd go 
over to management." 



Keeping Up With Jones 

A millionaire, asked the reason for 
his success, said, "I never hesitate to 
give full credit to my wife." 
"And how did she help?" 
"Frankly," said the millionaire, "I 
was curious to see if there was any 
income she couldn't live beyond." 

R U REGISTERED 2 VOTE.' 

Thought For Today 

Don't worry when you stumble; 
remember a worm is the only thing 
that can't fall down. 

U R THE "U" IN UNIONISM 

Getting The Job Done 

"Sam, how do you do your work so 
well and so fast?" 

"Well, Boss, I stick the match of 
enthusiasm to the fuse of energy, and 
I just naturally explode." 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 

Off and Running 

Mother had just given Mary Jane 
a severe talking-to on the wayward- 
ness of some of her playmates. "Now 
tell me," concluded, "where do bad 
little girls go?" 



^^^*&^^ 



"Just about everywhere,' 
worl